Rhetoric b meets Rhetoric of Consumer Culture


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Rhetoric B meets Rhetoric of Consumer Culture

  • Rhetoric B meets Rhetoric of Consumer Culture

  • Led by Anders Eriksson & John Peterson

  • April 16, 2008 WGLN Workshop




http://youtube.com/watch?v=FTSgoDATSYA&feature=related

  • http://youtube.com/watch?v=FTSgoDATSYA&feature=related







EXCERPTED from Minstrel Music: The Sounds and Images of Race in Antebellum America

  • EXCERPTED from Minstrel Music: The Sounds and Images of Race in Antebellum America

  • Richard L. Hughes Illinois State University

  •     

  • [….]  Of course, race, the most explosive issue of the antebellum period, lay at the center of minstrelsy. Although black minstrel performers existed before and after the Civil War, most of the composers, performers, and members of the audience were white. The characters, and supposedly their dialect, appearance, and behavior, were black. Sometimes, especially in the early years, white audience members believed that they were watching black performers. As a result, playbills for minstrel shows began to include illustrations of performers with and without blackface. (see document #7) More common was the perception that white performers portraying blacks were "accurate" and that songs were "full of real Negro atmosphere."2 Despite the fact that most performers and many composers had little if any experience with either the South or slavery, minstrelsy centered on a romantic portrait of southern plantation life. The surviving images and lyrics from the thriving minstrel business reveal demeaning caricatures that reduced African Americans to childish (or inhuman) figures contented with slavery and an opportunity to, according to one song, "Sing for the White Folks, Sing!“[….]











  • Abstract of Review of "Drugs and Youth Cultures: Local and Global Expressions.“Kleiman, Mark School of Public Policy and Social Research, UCLA, Los Angeles, CA, US Addiction Vol 102(1), Jan 2007, pp. 167-168

  • Reviews the book, Drugs and Youth Cultures: Local and Global Expressions by Philip Lalander and Mikko Salasuo (Eds.) (2005). This book uses a mix of ethnography and cultural criticism to describe youth drug cultures in the Scandinavian countries. It provides an account of the way participants in the Danish techno-culture define themselves against what they see as the sexualized, commercialized and violent disco culture. It also provides two separate but parallel accounts of backpacking and its relationship to drug use; it also provides accounts of how immigrants in Sweden and Norway adopt 'gangster' lifestyles. Three final essays provide media-critical perspectives on various Nordic drug scenes. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2007 APA, all rights reserved)

  • Database PsycINFO ISSN 0965-2140 Electronic ISSN 1360-0443



Stills from the half-time show at the 2004 Super Bowl

  • Stills from the half-time show at the 2004 Super Bowl





The Law and Economics of Wardrobe Malfunction

  • The Law and Economics of Wardrobe Malfunction

  • by Keith Brown and Adam Candeub* BIO: * Keith Brown is an economist at the Center for Naval StudiesAdam Candeub is an Assistant Professor of Law at Michigan State University College of Law

  • TEXT [*1463]  I. Introduction

  • Michael Powell, Chairman of the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) from 2001 to 2005, will likely be most remembered for his controversial indecency enforcement actions against Howard Stern's radio show and Janet Jackson's Super Bowl "wardrobe malfunction." n1 This legacy is probably deserved. In addition to these high-profile enforcement actions, Michael Powell imposed a higher total fine amount in 2004 for broadcast indecency than the amount imposed during the previous ten years combined. N2

  • Many have alleged that Powell's enforcement actions were politically motivated stunts made on behalf of powerful special interests. n3 Some have argued that the enforcement actions have had a chilling effect on free speech in broadcasting. n4 A few have even maintained that the FCC has used its licensure power to discourage owners of television and radio stations from challenging its indecency  [*1464]  actions in court n5 - a Byzantine maneuver that allows congressmen and FCC Commissioners to continue using the indecency enforcement publicity that courts might otherwise stop.

  • The FCC's enforcement process itself creates these problems and suspicions. First, because the FCC does not monitor the airwaves but instead relies upon citizen complaints to initiate enforcement, n6 particular interest groups can dominate enforcement even though indecency regulations are supposed to reflect "contemporary community standards." n7 According to a recent FCC estimate obtained by Mediaweek, 99.9% of indecency complaints in 2003 were filed by the Parents Television Council, an activist group with  [*1465]  links to conservative political and religious organizations. n8 As this Article demonstrates, increases in the number of FCC indecency actions have almost always been in response to political pressures emanating from interest groups[….]



Abstract This study provides a select thick reading of how the moral contagion that followed the exposure of Janet Jackson's breast during the broadcast of the 2004 Super Bowl moved into the commercial realm. It is framed by an assessment of how the Super Bowl was “super-cooled” by the “moral panic” that followed the Jackson incident. Super Bowl commercials, usually “celebrated” in postmortems of the broadcast, came under closer moral interrogation. To understand the cultural fallout and “cooled environment” that ensued, a critical approach that blends concerns over “communicative dirt,” the characterized reader, and ethical criticism is used in the analysis of four commercials that were “banned” from the 2005 Super Bowl broadcast. Conclusions focus on dynamics of moral contagion in the Jackson incident and its likely impact on moral contours of the public sphere in light of changed notions of “banned” texts in the internet era and selectivity in processes that lead to cooling.

  • Abstract This study provides a select thick reading of how the moral contagion that followed the exposure of Janet Jackson's breast during the broadcast of the 2004 Super Bowl moved into the commercial realm. It is framed by an assessment of how the Super Bowl was “super-cooled” by the “moral panic” that followed the Jackson incident. Super Bowl commercials, usually “celebrated” in postmortems of the broadcast, came under closer moral interrogation. To understand the cultural fallout and “cooled environment” that ensued, a critical approach that blends concerns over “communicative dirt,” the characterized reader, and ethical criticism is used in the analysis of four commercials that were “banned” from the 2005 Super Bowl broadcast. Conclusions focus on dynamics of moral contagion in the Jackson incident and its likely impact on moral contours of the public sphere in light of changed notions of “banned” texts in the internet era and selectivity in processes that lead to cooling.



http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=A5RZ4oIsusQ&NR=1

  • http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=A5RZ4oIsusQ&NR=1





Janet Jackson, photo from flickr

  • Janet Jackson, photo from flickr




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