Sandon Point and McCauley’s Beach Draft Plan of Management


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Sandon Point and 

McCauley’s Beach 

 

Draft 

Plan of Management 

 

Volume 4 - Sandon Point Aboriginal Place draft 



Management Plan 

 

see also:  



 

 



Volume 1 - Sandon Point and McCauley’s 

Beach draft Plan of Management 

 



Volume 2 – Sandon Point and McCauley’s 

Beach draft Access Plan 

 



Volume 3 - Sandon Point and McCauley’s 

Beach draft Revegetation and Restoration 

Plan  

 

Wollongong City Council 

November 2012 

 


Sandon Point and McCauley’s Beach Draft Plan of Management – Volume 4 – Aboriginal Place Management Plan  

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Table of Contents 

 

VOLUME 4 



SANDON POINT ABORINGINAL PLACE MANAGEMENT PLAN.................................................... 3 

1.  Introduction.................................................................................................................................................. 3 

2.  The Values of the Sandon Point Aboriginal Place........................................................................................... 3 

3.  Definition of Harm ........................................................................................................................................ 4 

4.  Protection of the Place ................................................................................................................................. 6 

5.  Protection Outside of the Place..................................................................................................................... 6 

6.  A Management Approach for Inside and Outside the Place............................................................................ 6 

7.  ACHS Areas approach to assessing harm...................................................................................................... 7 

8.  Exemptions to AHIP Processes ..................................................................................................................... 7 

9.  How Council followed the 11 Steps for developing management plans for declared Aboriginal Places in 

accordance with OEH Guidelines.......................................................................................................................... 15 

Appendix 1 

Sandon Point Aboriginal Place declaration ................................................................................ 20 

Appendix 2  

OEH – Fact Sheet – Protection of Aboriginal sites .................................................................... 21 

Appendix 3 

SPATE Vehicle Access Protocol -.............................................................................................. 25 

Appendix 4 

Agreed SPATE Cultural Event Protocols.................................................................................... 26 

Appendix 5 

National Parks and Wildlife Act 1974 Section 90 Permit 2130................................................. 27 

Appendix 6 

Illustrations of Possible Items Listed in Table 1 ........................................................................ 30 

 

 



List of figures 

Figure 1 

Sandon Point Aboriginal Place boundary.......................................................................................... 5 

Figure 2  

Sandon Point Surf Club ................................................................................................................... 8 

Figure 3 

The Aboriginal Cultural Heritage Sensitivity Areas (ACHS) .............................................................. 9 

Figure 4 

Known/recorded Aboriginal Heritage Sites..................................................................................... 10 

 

 



 

List of Tables 

 

Table 1 



ACHS Information:  Minimal Impact Activity Table – ......................................................................... 11 

Table 2 


ACHS Information:  Potential to Harm Activity Table and Potential Area AHIP– ................................ 12 

Table 3 


ACHS Information:  Potential to Harm Activity Table and Potential Individual Project AHIPs ......... 14 

Table 4 


Funding and Resource Needs for Conservation Projects ..................................................................... 18 

 

 



 

Sandon Point and McCauley’s Beach Draft Plan of Management – Volume 4 – Aboriginal Place Management Plan  

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VOLUME 4  SANDON POINT ABORINGINAL PLACE MANAGEMENT PLAN 



1. Introduction 

Aboriginal Places are a way of legally recognising and protecting Aboriginal cultural heritage on 

public and private lands.  The declaration of an Aboriginal Place does not change the ownership or 

management responsibility of an area of land, but places an extra layer or protection and legal 

process over the declared area.  Land Owners and individual or group users or visitors to an 

Aboriginal Place have a responsibility not to harm the values of the Place under the National Parks 

and Wildlife Act 1974.  Council, as land owner, seeks to meet those responsibilities in cooperation 

with the community and has developed this draft Sandon Point Aboriginal Place Management Plan 

to provide clear guidance as to how the values of the place are managed into the future.      

 

The NSW Office of Environment and Heritage (OEH) encourages the preparation of Aboriginal 



Place Management Plans and published “Guidelines for Developing Management Plans for 

Declared” in February 2011.  This draft Sandon Point Aboriginal Place Management Plan has been 

developed in accordance with OEH Guidelines and will be submitted to OEH for consideration.   

 

Council has been consulting with Aboriginal community members and OEH during the 



development of this Management Plan and the other components of the Sandon Point and 

McCauley’s Beach Plan of Management, with the aim to protect the values of the entire area and to 

create a clear path to maintaining and improving the area in compliance with the National Parks and 

Wildlife Act 1974 and other relevant legislation. The Aboriginal community identified management 

issues to consider and threats to the  values of the Sandon Point Aboriginal Place and to Aboriginal 

cultural heritage sites and values within the wider Plan of Management area generally.   

 

Until such time as OEH endorses the draft Sandon Point Aboriginal Place Management Plan, 



Council will use the Management Plan as a policy document.   

2. 

The Values of the Sandon Point Aboriginal Place 

On 16 February 2007, in the NSW Government Gazette No. 32, the Minister declared the Sandon 

Point Aboriginal Place under section 84 of the National Parks and Wildlife Act 1974.  A copy of the 

declaration is contained in Appendix 1. 

 

In the declaration the values of the place were identified by the Minister in the following statement:   



 

“The values of the Aboriginal place include a meeting place for Aboriginal groups; a ‘chiefs’ meeting place, a 

midden, and burials of Aboriginal people.”  

 

In the gazettal notification letter to Council by the then NSW Department of Environment and 



Conservation, (now the Office of Environment and Heritage – OEH) dated 14 February 2007; the 

values of the Sandon Point Aboriginal Place were further defined. 

 

“It is a place that has a history reflecting a resource rich environment where Aboriginal groups traditionally 

gathered for meetings, ceremonies and other activities, including camping and fishing.  The whole of Sandon 

Point area is considered a significant meeting place, and a story site located on the Sandon Point headland 

was a place where two leaders of two Aboriginal groups met. Further, the McCauley’s Beach midden is the 

surviving remnant of an extensive coastal midden, which includes an Aboriginal burial and re-burial site.  

The declaration of the Sandon Point Aboriginal Place acknowledges these values.”  

 


Sandon Point and McCauley’s Beach Draft Plan of Management – Volume 4 – Aboriginal Place Management Plan  

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These are the recognised values of the Sandon Point Aboriginal Place which must be addressed in 



the Sandon Point Aboriginal Place Management Plan, particularly in regard to identifying and 

managing actions that would or would not be considered to harm these values. 

 

3. 

Definition of Harm 

Generally speaking, the definition of activities that could destroy, deface or damage and/ or 

otherwise harm an Aboriginal Place or Object is wide ranging.  Some examples of activities that 

could harm an Aboriginal Place or Aboriginal Objects are:   

 



 



Visitors to the Place interfering with middens or other Aboriginal objects by touching them 

or moving them or collecting them* 

 

Human interference (vandalism, pilfering) with Burial grounds, cemeteries or burial places of 



known ancestors* 

 



Removing trees that contribute to the special significance of the site* 

 



Developing or maintaining roads or pathways 

 



Constructing dwellings 

 



Fire and managing fire 

 



Recreational activities such as, motorbike riding, four wheel driving 

 



Damming, pumping and diverging waterways 

 



Most major landscape changes to the place such as clearing or burning  of trees 

 



Infrastructure development 

 

A person or an organisation cannot harm an Aboriginal Place or Aboriginal Object without the 

granting of an Aboriginal Heritage Impact Permit or AHIP by the Office of Environment and 

Heritage.  The activities marked with an “*” would be activities for which it is highly unlikely that an 

Aboriginal Heritage Impact Permit (AHIP) would be granted by the Office of Environment and 

Heritage.  The penalties for harming an Aboriginal Place or Object have been recently increased and 

could include time in prison.  The penalties for persons and corporations breaching the National 

Parks and Wildlife Act 1974 can be found in Appendix 2.  

   

Council and other organisations will be seeking AHIPs as required by OEH and this Sandon Point 



Aboriginal Place Management Plan to carry out permissible activities and developments as described 

in the Sandon Point and McCauley’s Beach Plan of Management, subject to funding availability.  

Taken together, the following maps and information tables describe Council’s approach to managing 

compliance with the National Parks and Wildlife Act 1974 when maintaining and improving the 

area.   

 

The Sandon Point Aboriginal Place boundaries, as declared by the Minister, are shown on Figure 1, 



and other maps through out the Sandon Point and McCauley’s Beach Plan of Management.   

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Figure 1 

Sandon Point Aboriginal Place boundary 

 

 

Sandon Point and McCauley’s Beach Draft Plan of Management – Volume 4 – Aboriginal Place Management Plan  

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4. 



Protection of the Place 

The “Place Protection” that is afforded Sandon Point is a broadly defined protection that applies to 

all of the land within the declared area, whether there is an Aboriginal object present or not.  This is 

because often the value associated with Places is intangible and is based on the whole setting of a 

place, its existing natural features, its history in relation to Aboriginal people, how it makes an 

Aboriginal person feel when they visit or take care of the land or interact with others in ceremonies, 

celebrations or other cultural activities while on the land. 

 

5. 



Protection Outside of the Place 

Outside of the Sandon Point Aboriginal Place, it is an offence to destroy, deface or damage (ie 

harm) Aboriginal Objects such as, but not limited to,  carved trees, scarred trees, grinding grooves, 

fish traps, ochre or stone extraction sites, tool making sites, rock art, middens, ceremonial rings, and 

stone arrangements. Within the larger Sandon Point and McCauley’s Beach Management Plan area 

there are Aboriginal Objects that are protected under section 90 of the National Parks and Wildlife 

Act 1974.   

 

6. 



A Management Approach for Inside and Outside the Place 

- Aboriginal Cultural and Heritage Sensitivity Areas 1, 2, 3 

It is proposed that the approach to managing the values of the Sandon Point Aboriginal Place are 

applied to protecting all the Aboriginal Objects throughout the entire Sandon Point and McCauley’s 

Beach Plan of Management area.   

 

This draft Sandon Point Aboriginal Place Management Plan has divided the entire Plan of 



Management area into three areas of “Aboriginal Cultural and Heritage Sensitivity (ACHS).”  The 

idea is to manage threats to the Aboriginal Culture and Heritage by adopting different operational 

and management strategies in accordance with the type of Aboriginal cultural and heritage 

sensitivity.   

 

The Aboriginal Community has asked Council to consider the wider Sandon Point and McCauley’s 



Beach area holistically in developing management strategies.  Aboriginal Community members told 

Council during the pre draft Management Plan meetings, that the entire, wider, Sandon Point and 

McCauley’s Beach area, (beyond the community land along the foreshore that this Management Plan 

applies), is important to the Aboriginal Community, not just the declared Sandon Point Aboriginal 

Place.   

 

While Council understands the Aboriginal community has this connection with the wider Sandon 



Point and McCauley’s Beach area, this Management Plan only applies to the Plan of Management 

Area (ie the foreshore land that Council owns or manages) and does not apply to land not owned by 

Council. 

 

The sensitivity areas are mapped as ACHS areas 1, 2, and 3 in Figures 3a and 3b.  They are described 



below:   

 



 

Aboriginal Cultural and Heritage Sensitivity (ACHS) Area 1 (shaded yellow) – This land 

area could be described as the “core cultural heritage precinct” and includes the current 

Sandon Point Aboriginal Tent Embassy site and north side of Tramway Creek (including the 

McCauley’s Beach midden and Aboriginal burial and re-burial sites) 

 


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ACHS Area 2 (shaded green)  – The land area is the foreshore zone comprising the dune 

and cliff faces, erosion scarps and less developed/managed coastal areas (which contains 

several other recorded middens, areas with the potential to hold as yet unrecorded middens 

or other tangible heritage material, and locations considered to have high archaeological 

potential)  

 



 

ACHS Area 3 (shaded blue) - The land area is the existing managed grassed/landscaped or 

developed parts of the area, that have been and are subject to varying degrees of disturbance 

and regular on-going management, as well as the mobile beach zones and rock platforms (no 

recorded sites are now located in ACHS Area 3, however the presence of as yet unrecorded 

sites remains likely [other than in the beach zone]). 

 

7. 



ACHS Areas approach to assessing harm 

(IE NEED FOR ABORIGINAL 

HERITAGE IMPACT PERMITS – AHIP Applications)  

 

Within the framework of these three “zones of sensitivity”, possible actions have been assessed as 

either not harming or having the potential to harm the values of the Sandon Point Aboriginal Place 

or impact tangible Aboriginal cultural heritage sites/features.  This assessment is the result of the pre 

draft consultation with the Aboriginal Community, a site analysis and a review of current uses and 

management operations across the area.   The information tables following the ACHS map describe 

actions and propose if an Aboriginal Heritage Impact Permit is required, pending OEH 

concurrence.   

 

8. 

Exemptions to AHIP Processes 

The National  Parks and Wildlife Act 1974  provides exemptions to the offences of harming 

Aboriginal objects and Aboriginal Places, in relation to certain emergency works – such as 

emergency fire fighting or bush fire hazard reduction works or emergency activities carried out 

under the State Emergency and Rescue Management Act 1989 (such as coastal hazard emergency 

works).   

 

Aboriginal people and their dependants undertaking non-commercial traditional cultural activities, 



works by (or directed by) authorised OEH officers to protect Aboriginal objects, and activities 

under an approved conservation agreement are also – in many cases – exempt from the Act’s AHIP 

requirements.  OEH is the sole authority on the determination of possible exemptions to AHIP 

processes.      



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Existing Aboriginal Heritage Impact Permits within the Plan of Management area 

 

 



Figure 2  

Sandon Point Surf Club 

Existing AHIP 

 

Sandon Point Surf Life Saving Club 

Redevelopment  has a current Aboriginal 

Heritage Impact Permit.  No.  1131363.  

Allowing for construction and use of an access 

path from the car park to the surf club’s bottom 

floor until January 2014.   

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

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Figure 3 



The Aboriginal Cultural Heritage Sensitivity Areas (ACHS)  

 

 



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Figure 4 



Known/recorded Aboriginal Heritage Sites 

         (Note.   Confidential sites information are not shown)   

 

 

 



 

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Table 1 

ACHS Information:  Minimal Impact Activity Table –  

   


Proposed Minimal Impact Activities 

Aboriginal Cultural Heritage Sensitivity Area 

Number and Colour 

 

 



1 – yellow   

2 – blue   3 – green 

Routine park/reserve management operations on or above the current ground surface or 

superficial surface works (such as grass mowing/slashing, vegetation trimming, watering, 

irrigating, returfing, staking and tying, weeding, spraying, noxious weed removal, aerating and top 

dressing, soil conditioning, fertilising, soil testing, erosion control matting, pest and vermin control, 

disease control, rubbish removal, street sweeping, beach raking, repairs to existing park facilities, 

repainting, etc)  

 

No AHIP required 



 -  if there is no ground 

breaking and there is  

consultation or 

collaboration with 

Aboriginal People and 

Groups 


No 

AHIP 


required 

No AHIP 


required 

Above-ground vegetation management works such as brush-matting, reseeding/broadcast 

seeding, mulching, erosion control matting 

No AHIP required – In 

consultation or 

collaboration with 

Aboriginal People and 

Groups only 

No 


AHIP 

required 

No AHIP 

required 



landscaping or revegetation and vegetation management measures that do not require 

significant ground breaking or soil disturbance (hydroseeding, and other)   

 

AHIP required 

No 

AHIP 


required 

AHIP 


required 

Permissible leisure, recreation uses and events (including those involving temporary facilities 

or equipment on or above the current ground surface or having only superficial surface impacts)  

 

No AHIP required – if 



endorsed by Aboriginal 

people/groups 

No 

AHIP 


required 

No AHIP 


required 

Internal works or modifications to buildings, and works or modifications that do not increase  

a structure’s footprint 

 

No AHIP required 



No 

AHIP 


required 

No AHIP 


required 

 


 

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Table 2  ACHS Information:  Potential to Harm Activity Table and Potential Area AHIP–  

 

If there is a potential to harm, an AHIP application is required by OEH to assess if harm could occur or not and to make the appropriate determination 



about carrying out the activity.   

 

If there is a “yes” in a column in the table below, then Council is proposing to apply for an Area AHIP (s) for that activity.  If there is a “no” then an Area 



AHIP would not apply in that ACHS area for that activity and another type of AHIP or no AHIP is required.     

 

 



Potential to Harm Activities -  Proposed “Area” Aboriginal Heritage Impact 

Permit (AHIP) Required  - Subject to OEH agreement to an “Area” approach  and 

identification of conditions such as prior discussions with Aboriginal people/groups, pre-

works walk-over site inspections, or the presence of Aboriginal monitors during ground-

breaking.   



Aboriginal Cultural Heritage Sensitivity Area Number 

and Colour 

 

 



1 – yellow   

2 – blue  

3 – green 

Routine park management works involving occasional, scattered incidences of surface 

disturbance to a maximum depth of 300 millimetres (as non-mechanised disturbance, 

equating to a single shovel depth only)  – including activities such as sign installation, 

installing low-key/simple items of park furniture, scattered/individual landscape plantings 

or replacement, minor spot/site specific drainage or erosion control works, repairs to 

existing park facilities involving minor ground breaking or sub-surface works, and similar; 

No 


Yes – Area 

AHIP  


Yes – Area AHIP 

Constructing or maintaining sealed pathways, access ways, tracks, fencing or other linear 

park components  

No 


Yes – Area 

AHIP 


Yes – Area AHIP 

Maintenance of beach access ways, and construction of new beach accesses, at designated 

locations as identified in the Access Plan 

No 


Yes – Area 

AHIP 


Yes- Area AHIP  in 

areas where there is 

already a path or desire 

line and it is designated 

on the Access Plan 

The use and maintenance of the vehicle access route used by the Surf Club and Council 

Lifeguards to access the Sandon Point Surf life Saving Club when loading and unloading 

operational supplies or equipment.  Required maintenance activities to be  above-ground 

and minimal-disturbance 

Not Applicable  – 

The Access Route 

does not include 

this area 

Yes – Area 

AHIP 

Yes- Area AHIP 



 

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Potential to Harm Activities -  Proposed “Area” Aboriginal Heritage Impact 

Permit (AHIP) Required  - Subject to OEH agreement to an “Area” approach  and 

identification of conditions such as prior discussions with Aboriginal people/groups, pre-

works walk-over site inspections, or the presence of Aboriginal monitors during ground-

breaking.   



Aboriginal Cultural Heritage Sensitivity Area Number 

and Colour 

 

 



1 – yellow   

2 – blue  

3 – green 

Broad-area revegetation, bush regeneration, landscaping or site rehabilitation in 

accordance with the Revegetation and Restoration Plan 

 

No 



Yes – Area 

AHIP 


Yes – Area AHIP 

 

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Table 3  ACHS Information:  Potential to Harm Activity Table and Potential Individual Project AHIPs 

 

If there is a potential to harm, an AHIP application is required by OEH to assess if harm could occur or not and to make the appropriate determination 



about carrying out the activity.   

 

If there is a “yes” in a column in the table below, then Council is proposing that individual project AHIP applications would be required for that activity.  If 



there is a “no” then an individual AHIP would not apply in that ACHS area for that activity.      

 

Table 3:  Proposed Potential to Harm -  Require an individual development or activity 



AHIP on a case by case basis    

Aboriginal Cultural Heritage Sensitivity Area 

Number and Colour 

 

 



1 – yellow   

2 – blue   3 – green 

Buildings or major items of park infrastructure in any part of the Sandon Point Aboriginal Place  

Yes – Individual AHIP 

Yes 


Yes 

Works involving any sub-surface disturbance including, but not limited to sign posting, vegetation 

restoration and revegetation activities.   

 

Yes – Individual AHIP 



unless OEH concurs 

that vegetation 

restoration and 

revegetation in 

accordance with this 

Plan of Management 

carried out by Aboriginal 

Groups does not require 

an  AHIP  or  could  be 

included in an area 

AHIP.   

No No 


Buildings or major items of park infrastructure on or in proximity to a known tangible Aboriginal 

cultural heritage site/feature, or site of high archaeological potential. 



 

Yes – Individual AHIP 

Yes 

Yes 


Major “making good” works after storm or erosion damage 

Yes – Individual AHIP 

Yes 

Yes 


Major alterations to the landforms, terrain, vegetation communities or land use that will 

significantly alter the character and use of the area 

Yes – Individual AHIP 

Yes 


Yes 

 

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9. 

How Council followed the 11 Steps for developing management plans 

for declared Aboriginal Places in accordance with OEH Guidelines 

 

1. Define the relevant stakeholders and affected parties. 

 

Council has defined the following as stakeholders and affected parties in relation to the Sandon 



Point Aboriginal Place Management Plan:   

 



 

OEH 


 

 



Council  and Council’s Aboriginal Reference Group 

 



 

The Aboriginal Community Generally (defined as any Aboriginal person or group 

interested in Sandon Point and McCauley’s Beach as noted by a survey response, 

written correspondence or attendance at a pre draft consultation meeting or event from 

November 2011 and beyond)  

 



 

Specifically, the Aboriginal Groups listed on the “Keeping Place” Section 90 permit 

issued to a private land owner/developer (Stocklands) by OEH for residential 

development west of the Sandon Point area:   

o

 

Illawarra Local Aboriginal Land Council,  



o

 

Korewal Elouera Jerrungarah Tribal Elders Aboriginal Corporation, 



o

 

Sandon Point Tent Embassy,  



o

 

Wadi Wadi Coomaditchi Aboriginal Corporation  



o

 

Wodi Wodi Elders Council  



 

2. Prepare a general statement of management  

 

According to the OEH Guidelines, a general statement of management provides a summary of 



an Aboriginal community’s vision for the management of a gazetted Aboriginal Place.  Council 

has used the text from the OEH declaration letter and gazettal for this purpose as it provides a 

good summary of the importance of the Place and was confirmed by Aboriginal Groups during 

community consultation from November 2011 to July 2012.   



 

3. Prepare a statement of cultural values of the Aboriginal Place. 

 

Council referred to the OEH declaration letter and gazettal for the cultural values of the Sandon 

Point Aboriginal Place.  This was confirmed by Aboriginal Groups during community 

consultation from November 2011 to July 2012.   



 

4. Identify the Aboriginal community’s management goals. 

 

The main management goal of the Aboriginal Place Management Plan is to protect the cultural 

values of the Place as well as Aboriginal Objects.  Additionally, continuing the connection to 

Country for Aboriginal people and Aboriginal Organisations is important as well as increasing 

the wider non Aboriginal community’s knowledge of the area in relation to its great significance 

to Aboriginal people is also important.  Council will be actively pursuing licensing and/or leasing 



 

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community land for Aboriginal Cultural and Heritage activities and developments in the future 



and look forward to working with the community.   

 

5. Identify the types of activities that may harm the Aboriginal Place and the 

Associated cultural values 

 

The three areas of Aboriginal Cultural and Heritage Sensitivity that make up the entire Sandon 

Point and McCauley’s Beach Plan of Management area provide the method to identifying the 

types of activities that may harm the Aboriginal Place.  The AHIP information tables identify 

which activities require an AHIP. 

 

6. Identify what values objects and areas must be conserved. 

 

 



Burials and Re-burials should not be disturbed 

 

 



McCauley’s Beach midden is the surviving remnant of an extensive coastal midden and 

disturbances should be kept to a minimum in line with measures to protect the area or 

maintain a connection to Country as deemed permissible under the Sandon Point and 

McCauley’s Beach Management Plan and all its components.    

 



 



The area’s value as a meeting place and a place for Aboriginal Community members to 

conduct and take part in ceremonies or impart cultural and historical knowledge through 

education and practice to both Aboriginal and Non Aboriginal persons/groups should be 

preserved 

 

The entire Sandon Point and McCauley’s Beach Plan of Management Plan has been designed 



with protecting and sharing the Aboriginal Cultural and Heritage Value with others in mind.     

 

7. Identify what works and ongoing management activities are required 

 

The permissible uses under the Sandon Point and McCauley’s Beach Plan of Management are 

designed to identify what works and ongoing management activities are required.   For example, 

it is not permissible to for an Outdoor Personal Fitness Trainer to use or have a license within 

the Sandon Point Aboriginal Place, while it is a permissible use, in compliance with existing 

development consent, on the lawn areas of community land south east of Beach Street.   

 

The draft Access Plan does not provide for general public access through to the beach in areas 



that contain burials or reburials.  General public access to McCauley’s Beach is being rationalised 

and kept to existing disturbed areas.    It is a permissible use to develop physical or built 

expressions of the importance of the Sandon Point Aboriginal Place to promote the importance 

of the area to the wider community. 



 

8. Identify other matters that may need to be negotiated between all identified 

groups. 

 

Council will need to negotiate with Aboriginal Community members on matters relating to 

future licenses, compliance with the Sandon Point and McCauley’s Beach Plan of Management 

components (which includes this OEH plan) and on ways to increase the wider non Aboriginal 

community’s understanding of the importance of the area.   

 


 

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Council welcomes the opportunity in the future to collaborate with Elders and others to design 



and construct signs, decorative pathways, art works and possibly small scale buildings such as a 

community information kiosk with pubic toilets, an Aboriginal Culture, Community and 

Education Centre, and/or Cultural camping ground depending on future resources and ability to 

obtain development consents for such improvements.      



 

9. Define ways in which culturally sensitive information will be treated.  

 

Information already in the public domain has been provided so that areas in need of protection 

or careful management are identified.  Specific Aboriginal Elders/Persons have not been quoted 

to explain the area’s importance (even if information was provided on the OEH website) out of 

respect for their knowledge and their own ability to share information with the general public as 

they determine is appropriate.   

 

Council is looking forward to working with the Aboriginal Community to protect the area and 



tell the story of the place to the general public by means that are permissible under the Plan of 

Management and in compliance with this Sandon Point and Aboriginal Place Management Plan.    

 

10. Explain, if funding and resources are available for conservation projects 

through grants and the ways in which the funds will be used. 

 

Council currently has operational funds for the development of the Sandon Point and 

McCauley’s Beach Plan of Management and this Place Management Plan.  There are also funds 

available for routine park and beach/foreshore maintenance, including regulatory signage or 

minor safety improvements. 

 

Improvements such as widening the shared way, providing decorative pavement works or 



historical signs, developing an information kiosk, or future Aboriginal Community, Education 

Centre and/or Aboriginal Cultural camping ground will require inclusion in a future Capital 

budget and partnering organisations with their own funds or grant funds to put towards the 

relevant projects.     

 

Any improvements within the Plan of Management area need to be balanced with the need to 



acknowledge the importance of the Sandon Point Aboriginal Place and financial constraints.  For 

example, every future improvement within Sandon Point and McCauley’s Beach has to contend 

with significant land constraints that will increase its cost and require extensive community 

consultation in terms of location, design and construction methods and future ongoing 

management of the asset. 

 

Permissible use improvements built within the Community Land at Sandon Point and 



McCauley’s Beach will only be possible with community commitment and future grant funding. 

If the improvements could be built, they have been listed as a permissible use/development in 

the draft Plan of Management; however the costs of meeting all the constraints may be 

prohibitive.   

 

Under the draft Plan of Management it is permissible to do the following to acknowledge the 



Aboriginal Cultural and Heritage importance of the area: 

 


 

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Table 4 

Funding and Resource Needs for Conservation Projects 

Permissible Use or Development to 

Acknowledge the Aboriginal 

Significance of the Sandon Point 

Aboriginal Place 

Estimated cost without design plans, 

engineering reports, etc, based on past similar 

costs incurred by Council.   

Signs, decorative pathways and/or other 

art work depicting its history and the 

ongoing cultural connection to country  

$10,000 - 50,000 depending on scale 

Construction of Whale Watching or Surf 

Viewing Platform with access to the beach 

just North of Garaban Court designed to 

acknowledge Aboriginal Culture – as per 

Access Plan 

$200,000 

Small Electronic Community Information 

Kiosk with or without public toilets that 

provides information on Aboriginal 

Groups linked with the area.  Could be 

built outside of the Aboriginal Place, but 

within the Plan of Management area.     

 

$150,000  



Controlling western ‘through’ traffic to the 

beach access by formalising some existing 

paths and eliminating others by fencing or 

vegetation as per the Access Plan   

$30,000  

Widening the portion of the shared way 

used by Aboriginal Groups or Persons to 

access the current Sandon Point Tent 

Embassy and/or future Aboriginal 

Cultural, Education Centre and/or Cultural  

campground 

$500,000 – may include purchasing a small amount 

of private land to the west and there are 

considerable constraints to manage, as well as 

AHIP permit application.  

Installation of Convex Mirror for 

improved site lines for authorised vehicles, 

walkers and cyclists.  Designed to be less 

ground impacting.   

$5,000 for design and installation.   

Development of an Aboriginal Cultural 

Camping Ground (no more than 6 

camping sites) which SPATE and other 

Aboriginal Groups/People have access to 

in the current SPATE location. 

Costs are variable and will depend on the type of 

camping, (whether less than 42 days a year or more 

often) and the type of camping ground site (tent, 

caravan or other).  $30,000 to $400,000  

Development of future Aboriginal Culture 

Community Education Centre which 

SPATE and other Aboriginal 

Groups/People have access to in the 

current SPATE location.   

$500,000 to $800,000.  Notably costs of 10,000 to 

$15,000 will be incurred to determine where the 

nearest services are located and to determine the 

relevant ground levels to confirm that the location 

is within the Medium Flood Risk area.  The costs 

would be in addition to AHIP application, design 

and then construction and on going operational 

maintenance.  Costs would rise if an ancillary care 

taker facility was part of the centre. 

Leasing and Licensing Costs related to 

Aboriginal Cultural and Heritage Activities 

Section 47D of the Local Government Act 1993 

requires a lease or license to occupy community 

land on a regular basis, Council will work with 



 

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Permissible Use or Development to 

Acknowledge the Aboriginal 

Significance of the Sandon Point 

Aboriginal Place 

Estimated cost without design plans, 

engineering reports, etc, based on past similar 

costs incurred by Council.   

Aboriginal Groups connected to Sandon Point and 

McCauley’s Beach to work out license agreements, 

however there are costs involved that Aboriginal 

Groups may struggle to meet.  Grant funds may be 

available for this purpose. 

A Keeping Place as described in the 

Section 90 Permit Consent # 2130 issued 

to Stockland Development Pty Ltd and 

shown in appendix 5. 

It is a Stockland requirement of the Section 90 

permit.  Depending on the form and location, and 

its management strategy, the Keeping Place may be 

a building or an area where artefacts are re-interred 

and there is interpretive signs/walkways/paths. 

 

11. List contacts. 

 

This information will be provided to OEH directly rather than listed in this public document. 



 

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Appendix 1  Sandon Point Aboriginal Place declaration 

 


 

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Appendix 2  OEH – Fact Sheet – Protection of Aboriginal sites 

 


 

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Appendix 3  SPATE Vehicle Access Protocol -   

 

Vehicular Access to the Sandon Point Aboriginal Tent Embassy from Sandon Drive, 

Bulli 

 

SPATE is required to ensure that the following previously agreed protocols are adhered to by all 



those accessing the tent embassy: 

 

1



 

Vehicle access to the tent embassy will only be gained from Sandon Drive

2

 

Any bollards temporarily removed to enable vehicular access must be relocated and 



relocked immediately upon the vehicles passing the bollards; 

3

 



Bollards must be replaced to provide a continuous row of three to prevent unauthorised 

vehicular entry; 

4

 

A 'spotter' must walk in front of all vehicles moving along the shared path between the 



bollards and the tent embassy. This person must walk a suitable distance in front of the 

vehicle to provide the vehicle driver and shared path users with sufficient warning of 

each other to minimise the risk of a collision or accident; 

5

 



Vehicles travelling on the shared path section of the access route should do so at a very 

slow speed (walking pace) and provide 'right-of-way' to shared path users by stopping to 

allow path users to pass to prevent conflicts; 

6

 



Vehicle access to the tent embassy should be minimised as far as possible to reduce 

potential conflicts with shared path users. Visitors to the tent embassy should park on 

Sandon Drive or adjacent streets and walk into the site. 

 

Council will be monitoring these protocols and the site closely and failure to ensure the safety of 



all path users by following these protocols will result in more restrictive measures to be put in 

place to ensure public safety is not compromised.  

 

 

 



 

 

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Appendix 4  Agreed SPATE Cultural Event Protocols 



SPATE carries out events similar to those described in the Proceedings No 41009/2010  

 

 

 

 

1. 



The organisers shall make all reasonable efforts and take appropriate steps to ensure that: 

 

(a)



 

no music is audible at any residential premises after (i) 7pm on Friday  and Saturday; 

and (ii) after 7.30pm Sunday. 

 

(b)



 

No general public camping, other than Aboriginal elders and carers who have been 

previously invited, up to 50, takes place. 

 

(c)



 

Camping for invited elders to take place in two tents of no greater than 7 x 7 metres; 

 

(d)


 

The stage is to be no larger than 3 x 4 metres in length, and 500mm in height. 

 

(e)


 

Lighting be restricted to a single lighting bar in the proposed marquee and no more 

than 3 outside lights for safety purposes. 

 

(f)



 

The feature Act shall perform only between 6.30pm and 7.30pm on Sunday. 

 

2.

 



No public parking is to take place on the site. 

 

3.



 

As soon as practicable, the Organisers will take all reasonable steps to advise 

attendees of these conditions including issuing a media release to local newspapers 

and radio stations. 

 

 

 



 

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Appendix 5  National Parks and Wildlife Act 1974 Section 90 Permit 2130 

National Parks and Wildlife Act 1974 Section 90 Permit No 2130 

 

 


 

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Appendix 6  Illustrations of Possible Items Listed in Table 1 



 – Funding and Resource Needs for Conservation Projects 

 

 



Aboriginal Cultural Heritage Education Centre – Option 2 in the Plan of Management – This is 

the Botanic Gardens Visitor Education Centre.   

 

 

 



Community Information Kiosk with information about Aboriginal Group Activities in the Area 

as well as other community groups 



 

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Access Plan Whale Viewing Platform Ideas/Sketches  



 

 

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Access Plan Whale Viewing Platform Ideas/Sketches  




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