Script The Rajput Polity under the Mughals


Download 63.72 Kb.

Sana08.07.2018
Hajmi63.72 Kb.

          History of India  

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 



 

HISTORY 

 

Subject   



 

 

:   History 



                                

(For under graduate student)  

 

Paper No. 



:   Paper - III  

 

History of Mughal India 



 

Unit No. & Title 

Unit – 8 



 

       


 

Patterns of Regional Polity  

 

Topic No. & Title 



Topic - 1 

 

 

Rajasthan 



 

Lecture No. & Title 

:     Lecture - 1 

 

 



 

Rajput Polity (Part-1) 



 

 

Script 

 

The Rajput Polity under the Mughals 

 

During  the  ninth  and  tenth  centuries  a  number  of  Rajput 

clans  became  prominent  as  independent  dynasties  ruling 

over kingdoms. The Rajputs played a significant role in the 

history of the Mughal period. Their origins have been much 

debated. Recent discussions of Rajput identity are related to 

processes  of  historical  change,  particularly  the  widespread 


          History of India  

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 



 

phenomenon  of  families  from  varied  backgrounds  rising  to 

royal  authority.  Some  traced  themselves  back  to 

Brahmanas,  presumably  those  who  had  received  grants  of 

land  from  existing  kings.  A  high  administrative  office  could 

also facilitate an upwardly moving status. Others could have 

conquered  forest  clans,  or  were  descendants  of  clans  that 

had constituted the chiefdoms and oligarchies in Rajasthan. 

During  the  time  of  the  Guptas,  many  races  from  outside 

India came, like the Sakas and Hunas, who got assimilated 

into Indian life and culture. It is assumed by some that the 

Rajputs may have originated from one of those races. They 

were  identified  with  the  kshatriyas  and  called  Rajputs 

because they belonged to the royal family and because they 

belonged to Rajasthan, the land of the rajas. 

 

During  the  Mughal  period,  they  occupied  the  areas  of 



present  day  Jodhpur,  Bikaner,  Jaissalmer,  Jaipur, 

Dongarpur, Pratapgarh, Kota, Bundi, etc.    

 

When the Mughals came, the Rajput principalities began to 



assert  a  semi-independent  role.  First  the  Chauhans  of 

Ranthambhor  and  the  Marwar  family  began  to  dominate. 



          History of India  

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 



 

But  gradually  these  were  ousted  by  Mewar,  which  became 

the most prominent principality of Rajasthan. It was Mewar 

which  led  the  Rajput  battle  against  the  Delhi  Sultans  and 

later the Mughals. 

 

State Formation of Rajasthan 

The  Rajputs  who  till  the  tenth  century  were  mostly  local 

feudal  lords under the Gurjara-Pratihara  overlords asserted 

themselves as independent rulers as soon as the Ghaznavid 

storm had blown over and took over the earlier kingdoms of 

their  Gurjara-Pratiharas.  The  main  Rajput  kingdoms  in  the 

eleventh and twelfth century were that of the Chauhanas in 

northern  Rajputana  and  Delhi,  The  Paramaras  of  Malwa, 

Tomaras of Gwalior and the Rathods who ruled over present 

day Uttar Pradesh. 

 

[The state formation of Rajasthan principalities more or less 



remains the same. First we have the immigration (for ex: in 

Marwar)  roughly  about  7

th

  or  8


th

  century  A.D.  From  that 

time  onwards  it  continued  in  an  unbroken  line.  There  is 

reference  of  some  documents  in  Pali  of  the  villages  of 

Marwar, which states that the Brahmins were very rich and 


          History of India  

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 



 

powerful.  They  cultivated  lands  and  made  much  money 

from  agricultural  trade.  These  Brahmins  became  the  so 

called  gurus  of  the  Ranas.  Below  them  were  the  aboriginal 

tribes,  the  Mir  tribes,  who  at  first  allowed  the  Brahmins  to 

do whatever they wanted. But then gradually they began to 

assert  themselves.  Over  the  Mirs,  there  were  the 

intermediaries called the chowdharies who were the revenue 

collectors.  When  the  Mirs  started  trouble,  the  chowdharies 

and  some  of  the  Brahmins  were  left.  But  others  called  the 

Rajputs  to  come  in.  They  established  the  right  of  thakurai 

i.e.,  almost  of  zamindari.  From  then  on  the  Rajputs  state 

was  formed.  Thus,  the  aboriginal  tribe  was  always  there, 

the  middle  level  revenue  collector,  and  then  the  clan 

brothers and blood brothers of the royal family.] 

 

There  were  persistent  problems  in  the  Rajputs  states  and 



their  polity  at  two  levels.  One  was  between  the  upper  tier 

and  the  lowest  aboriginal  tribes.  The  other  and  more 

important  and  crucial  were  the  fratricidal  troubles  in  the 

Rajput families. The Mughal period witnessed the upper tier 

among the Rajputs or the royal families being helped by the 

tribes.  



          History of India  

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 



 

It  was  in  this  sort  of  a  situation  that  Mewar  gradually 

asserted  its  role.  Rana  Kumbha  of  the  Sisodia  clan  was  a 

remarkable  ruler  and  his  reign  was  one  of  expansion  and 

consolidation.  He  was  great  general  and  ruled  Mewar 

between 1433 and 1468. The combined armies of the rulers 

of Malwa  and  Gujarat were  defeated by him, and it was to 

commemorate this victory that he built a victory tower and 

palace at Chittor. Like other Rajput chiefs he was a cultured 

person imbued with Vaishnavism. 



 

Rana Kumbha’s son Udai murdered him to gain the throne; 

he in turn was ousted by his son Rana Sanga. 

 

Rana  Sanga  established  his  sovereignty  almost  over  all  of 



Rajputana. He captured the ruler of Malwa and made him a 

prisoner.  Even  when  Ibrahim  Lodi  attacked  him  in  1519, 

Rana Sanga defeated him easily.  He  established  himself  as 

one of the most powerful rulers.  

 

Babur Vs Rana Sanga 

When  Babur  was  at  the  gates  of  India  in  the  Punjab,  it 

appears  from  the  autobiography  of  Babur  that  there  had 


          History of India  

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 



 

been some correspondence between Babur and Rana Sanga 

in  which  the  latter  had  proposed  that  the  former  should 

attack  Delhi  and  that  he  would  offer  assistance.  But  when 

Babur  attacked  Delhi  Rana  Sanga  made  no  move  at  all  to 

help him. Rana Sanga may have realized that Babur was not 

like  Timur  who  went  away  after  ransacking  Delhi,  but  that 

he  was  interested  in  creating  an  empire.  He  therefore 

organized  a  confederacy  of  other  Rajput  states  against  the 

Mughal  ruler.  Interestingly  one  of  the  Lodi  families  also 

joined  with  10,000  Afghan  cavalry.  Another  Hasan  Khan 

Mewati also joined with some cavalry.  Therefore, it was an 

army of Rana Sanga composed of both the Rajputs and the 

Muslims.  The  dual  objective  was  to  drive  out  Babur  and 

restore the Lodis to the throne of Delhi. 

 

They had two objectives; firstly, to drive Babur out of India, 



secondly  to  place  the  Lodi  to  the  throne  of  Delhi.  The 

Mughals and Rajput Confederacy met each other in decisive 

contest  at  Khanwah  near  Fatehpur  Sikri  in  March  1527. 

While  the  Rajputs  still  depended  on  elephants  and 

swordsmen on the battlefield Babur had firepower and used 

the musket to his advantage. Babur’s well planned strategy 



          History of India  

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 



 

also ensured that the Rajputs lost the battle.  

 

The  defeat  of  Rana  Sanga  cannot  be  described  as  a  Hindu 



Muslim fight, neither can it be described as a Rajput bid for 

hegemony  in  Northern  India,  as  Rana  Sanga  had  Muslims 

and Muslim leaders in his confederacy. 

 

In  his  Ain-i-Akbari  Abul  Fazl  has  mentioned  that  Humayun 



made several matrimonial alliances with the zamindars.  He 

did  not  made  any  specific  comment  about  Humayun 

marrying  any  Rajput  princes.  But  Humayun  probably 

suggested  to  Akbar  to  make  matrimonial  alliances  with 

Rajputs. Thus, the conciliation of Rajputs was then left up to 

the Akbar.   

 

Akbar’s  matrimonial  alliances  are  quite  well  known.  But 



there are misconceptions about these alliances. It has been 

stated  that  those  Rajputs  who  gave  their  daughters  in 

marriage,  gained  promotions,  powers,  and  prestige,  etc. 

that  is  hardly  true.  The  Rajputs  like  Sujan  Rai  Hada,  who 

fought  for  the  Mughals,  did  not  give  their  daughters  in 

marriage.  But  they  had  gone  up  also  in  their  mansabdari. 



          History of India  

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 



 

But  the  important  feature  of  the  matrimonial  alliances  was 

that  it  was  something  new  in  its  content.  Though  this  kind 

of  practice  was  already  known  even  between  the  Muslim 

rulers of Gujarat and Malwa with the Rajput princesses. But 

Rajput-Mughal  matrimonial  alliances  had  something  new 

which changed the Rajput polity? 

 

Matrimonial Policy 

The  new  thing  was  that  Akbar  first  of  all  did  not  consider 

such  marriages as  a test of  loyalty.  In 1564, when he was 

coming  back  from  Ajmer,  Raja  Beharimal  of  Amber  i.e., 

Jaipur  complained  to  him  that  the  Mewar  governor  was 

harassing  him.    The  principle  reason  was  that  Beharimal’s 

brother  wanted  Beharimal  to be ousted, and  he had joined 

the  Mewat  governor.  This  was  the  same  legacy  of  Rajput 

polity  that  continued  even  during  the  time  Akbar.  Akbar 

suggested  that  Beharimal  should  make  a  personal 

submission to him and give his daughter in marriage to him, 

which he did. 

 

As  a  result  of  this,  his  harassment  was  stopped,  but  there 



was  something  more.  His  son  Bhagwandas  was  taken  into 

          History of India  

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 



 

the  service  of  Akbar’s  court.  He  was  given  a  very 

responsible 

position. 

During 

the 


Uzbek 

rebellion, 

Bhagwandas was made  in-charge of the guard of the royal 

ladies of the Mughal camp.  He was also there in the battle 

of Haldi Ghat against Rana Pratap.  Bhagwandas was one of 

the  joint  governors  along  with  Abdulla  Sultanpuri  of  Agra 

when Akbar left for Gujarat campaign. Therefore, there was 

a  fundamental  change  between  the  earlier  marriages  and 

the marriage contracted by Akbar.   

 

Now those people who had given their daughters to Akbar, 



they were now taken into the service. Maan Singh was one 

such  Rajput,  who  was  made  governor  of  Kabul,  Indus 

region,  Bengal,  and  Bihar.  He  was  also  made  7000 

mansabdar.  He  was  the  second  person,  who  held  such  a 

high post after Aziz Khan Koka. 

 

In Akbar’s matrimonial alliances particularly after the fall of 



Chittor,  other  Rajput  rulers  like  Bikaner  and  Jaisalmer 

proposed  personal  submission  and  gave  their  daughters  in 

marriage  to  Akbar.  Akbar’s  matrimonial  alliances  can  be 

divided into three types. From 1572, onwards to 1576, it is 



          History of India  

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

10 


 

 

seen that the Rajputs were taken into the service, but they 



were  not  fighting.  The  second  stage  is  up  to  1578,  when 

Rajputs were taken into the service and they were asked to 

fight  within  Rajasthan.  After  1578,  the  Rajputs were asked 

to  fight  outside  Rajasthan  on  behalf  of  the  Mughals.  The 

reason for these fights was the rebellion in Bengal and Bihar 

in  1580-81  supported  by  the  Mullas,  who  issued  fatwa 

against  Akbar.  Akbar  had  practically  left  the  orthodox 

Ulema.  He  started  his  Majar  and  Din-e-Elahi.  The  Ulema’s 

were  very  unhappy  and  they  called  his  half-brother  Mirza 

Hakim from Kabul and he arrived in Punjab. Akbar therefore 

could  not  rely  on  Irani  and  the  Turani  captains  and  rather 

brought  the  Rajputs  into  the  fight.  They  did  fight  and 

suppressed  the  rebellion.  Therefore,  there  is  a  difference 

what  we  see  between  Akbar’s  matrimonial  alliances  with 

other such alliances made earlier.   

 

We  can  see  Akbar’s  claim  to  sovereignty  even  over  the 



Rajput,  in  relation  to  Mewar.  Rana  Pratap  had  descended 

the  throne  in  1572.  Akbar  was  busy  elsewhere,  but 

eventually  sent  three  envoys  including  Maan  Singh  to 

Chittor  for  personal  submission  of  Rana  Pratap,  which  was 



          History of India  

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

11 


 

 

the  principle  issue.  It  may  be  noted  that  Maan  Singh  was 



not insulted by Rana Pratap.   

 

 


Do'stlaringiz bilan baham:


Ma'lumotlar bazasi mualliflik huquqi bilan himoyalangan ©fayllar.org 2017
ma'muriyatiga murojaat qiling