The Genetics of the Samaritans and Other Middle Eastern Peoples


Download 111.76 Kb.

Sana27.03.2017
Hajmi111.76 Kb.

The Genetics of the Samaritans 

and Other Middle Eastern 

Peoples 

Marc Feldman 

Department of Biology, Stanford University 

 

For class:    



From Generation to Generation:  

Scientific and Cultural Approach to Jewish Genetics

 



 

 

September 27, 2012 



  

    mfeldman@stanford.edu 



Tools to detect human variation 

1) Morphology/phenotypes/diseases 

2) Blood groups 

3) Proteins/allozymes 

4) Restriction fragment length polymorphisms 

(RFLPs) 


5) Microsatellites (short tandem repeats, STRs) 

6) Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) 

DNA 


HUMAN DNA: ABOUT 3 BILLION 

NUCLEOTIDES (ATCG

Microsatellites: Short Tandem Repeats 

(about 100,000 of these.) 

2



6 base repeats, e.g., (CA  CA 



… 

CA)n

 

Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms 



Me 

    A T A 



A

 C C G T A 

You 


    A T A 

T

 C C G T A 

                        

More than 10 million of these.  


DNA in nucleus of cells organized as 23 pairs of 

chromosomes. 

 22 pairs are 

autosomes

; one of each pair from mother, 

one from father, with breakage and reunion 

(recombination). 

 One pair are the 

sex chromosomes

female   XX,     male   XY 



Y is passed from father to son with no recombination

like surnames. 



Within cells are DNA containing organelles called 

mitochondria

, which are passed from mother to child 

without recombination ≈ 16,000 nucleotides.

 

Y

 is paternally transmitted



male lineage



mt DNA 

is maternally transmitted

 

female lineage





Mutations: changes in nucleotides, e.g., A 

 T, 



accumulate over time, so a measure of the differences 

between lineages can be a proxy for time since 

divergence. 

Mutations in microsatellites are more difficult to use for 

dating because the changes are frequent and 

reversible, e.g., 16  

 18  


 17 repeats. STRs 

With enough variation due to accumulation of 

mutations, we can compare families, populations, 

nations, continents. 


Explanations of the patterns of observed variation 

(ultimately traced to mutation) 

1. Migration 

2. Natural selection (reproduction/survival) 

3. Marriage patterns 

4. Population size 



Polymorphisms reveal different Y-

chromosomal and 

autosomal histories in Samaritans 

 

Facts:  (i)    Assyrians conquer Israel 722

721 BCE, 



 

(ii)   Assyrians replace [some?] locals with foreigners. 

 

(iii)  Hezekiah, king of Judah 715



686 BCE. 

The inhabitants of Samaria/Samerina, who agreed [and plotted] 



with a king [hostile to] me not to do service and not to bring tribute 

[to Ashshur] and who did battle, I fought against them with the 

power of the great gods, my lords. I counted as spoil 27,280 

people, together with their chariots, and gods, in which they 

trusted. I formed a unit with 200 of [their] chariots for my royal 

force. I settled the rest of them in the midst of Assyria. I 

repopulated Samaria/Samerina more than before. I brought into it 

people from countries conquered by my hands. I appointed my 

eunuch as governor over them. And I counted them as Assyrians.

 



              

                                   (Nimrud Prisms, COS 2.118D, pp. 295

296.) 


 

Politics and history in the ancestry of the Samaritans 

Returnees from Babylonian exile (586

538 BCE) start to 



rebuild the temple destroyed by Babylonians. 

Samaritans want to participate, but they want the temple 

at Mount Gerizim (near Shechem, Nablus). Spurned by 

Zerubavel and colleagues. 

The Jews claim  (1) Samaritans are not 

Hebrews



 



 

      (2) They have adopted non-Hebrew 

 

 

 



 customs. 

Result: Jewish documents from 6

th

 century BCE and later 



regard Samaritans as 

bad,



 at best 2

nd

 class citizens. 



Except for the famous story in the New Testament. 

 


II Chronicles 30:1 

And Hezekiah sent to all Israel and Judah and wrote letters also 



to Ephraim and Manasseh that they should come to the home of 

the Lord at Jerusalem to keep the Passover. 

II Kings 17: 24 



And the king of Assyria brought men from Babylon and from 

Cuthah and from Ara and from Hamath and from Sepharaim and 

placed them in the cities of Samaria instead of the children of 

Israel and they possessed Samaria…

 

Books of Kings (originally one book): post-Solomon era 960



560 


BCE. 

 

 Division into:   Israel (north),  Judah (south). 



Books of Chronicles (written much later, perhaps 4

th

 century BCE) 



retells a lot of Kings

 


The Samaritans claim to be descendants of the remnants 

of Israel not transplanted by the Assyrians but descended 

from Joseph

s sons, Ephraim and Manasseh. 



Samaritans numbered more than a million in early Roman 

times. Decimated by later Romans, Christians, Muslims 

  

Less than 150 in 1917.  About 750 in 2009. 



Location:  

about half in Holon (Tel Aviv) 

 

 

about half in Nablus (Shechem). 



Extreme endogamy and marriage within the four 

remaining lineages. 



Joshua-Marhiv,_Danfi,_Tsedaka'>Samaritan belonging is passed via 

male lineage: 

Cohen, Joshua-Marhiv, Danfi, Tsedaka 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



Classical Genetics of the Samaritans 

Blood group O: 67%. One of the highest frequencies in the 

world (indigenous Americans excepted). 



Rh

: 19%.   (Basques ~ 21% 

 

 

 Europeans ~ 16% 



 

 

 Africans < 1% 



 

 

 Asians < 1%) 



G6PD (favism): Absent (> 4% in most Middle East Arab  

populations). 



Red-green color blindness: More than 28% of males, 24% of 

mothers or sisters of color blind men were color blind. 

(Bonné, B. (1966) Am. J. Phys. Anthrop. 24: 1

20) 



84% of marriages are first or second cousins. Mean 

inbreeding coefficient 0.062, highest of any human population.  



Sample from Holon 

 

27 males    20 females 



12 males separated by > 2 paternal generations 

 

9 males, 7 females separated by > 2 maternal generations 



Study sample 

 12 Y chromosomes 

16 Mt DNA 


Table 8. Y chromosome haplotype distances among 

Samaritan families. 



Tribe

Levi

Ephraim

Manasseh

Lineage

Family C1 C2 JM JM JM JM D1 D2 TS1 TS1 TS1 TS2

C1

1



15

15

15



15

17

18



15

15

15



16

Cohen

C2

16



16

16

16



16

17

14



14

14

15



JM

0

0



0

8

7



4

4

4



8

JM

0



0

8

7



4

4

4



8

JM

0



8

7

4



4

4

8



Joshua-Marhiv

JM

8



7

4

4



4

8

D1



1

4

4



4

3

Danfi

D2

5

5



5

4

TS1



0

0

1



TS1

0

1



TS1

1

Tsedaka

TS2

Entries in the table are the total number of single-step repeats mutations between two 



corresponding chromosomes. Tribes may include more than one lineage as defined by family 

name. Family names annotated as in Table 1. 



Table 2. Polymorphism of STR markers 

Gene diversity 

Number of alleles 

 

Marker 



Samaritans* 

Average for  

non-Samaritan 

populations* 

Samaritans 

Average for  

non-Samaritan 

populations 

DYS19


a

 

0.00 



0.89 

4.00 



DYS385A 

0.88 


0.93 

6.50 



DYS385B 

0.92 


0.93 

6.50 



DYS388 

0.88 


0.76 

3.63 



DYS389 

0.62 


0.79 

3.38 



DYS390 

0.72 


0.89 

3.75 



DYS391 

0.80 


0.73 

2.63 



DYS393 

0.62 


0.86 

3.25 



GGAAT1B07 

0.81 


0.87 

4.25 



Y chromo-

some 

Average† 

0.69 


0.85 

2.4 


4.21 

 

 



 exp.  (obs.

 exp.  (obs.

 

 



D1S235 

0.78 (0.50) 

0.79 (0.72) 

7.88 



D2S410 

0.48 (0.60) 

0.70 (0.82) 

4.75 



D2S1400 

0.67 (0.70) 

0.65 (0.57) 

4.25 



D3S1311 

0.86 (0.50) 

0.79 (0.69) 

8.88 



D3S2387 

0.75 (0.78) 

0.86 (0.73) 

9.75 



D4S2361 

0.57 (0.50) 

0.76 (0.62) 

6.13 



D5S1456 

0.80 (0.89) 

0.79 (0.72) 

6.25 



D7S2846 

0.66 (0.56) 

0.74 (0.73) 

6.38 



D8S1128 

0.83 (0.80) 

0.80 (0.71) 

7.00 



D9S934 

0.79 (1.00) 

0.79 (0.76) 

6.75 



D10S1426 

0.70 (0.50) 

0.73 (0.71) 

5.50 



D11S4464 

0.65 (0.50) 

0.75 (0.71) 

6.13 



D17S1298 

0.71 (0.60) 

0.69 (0.59) 

5.00 



D20S851 

0.89 (0.90) 

0.86 (0.71) 

9.50 



Autosomes 

Average 

0.73 (0.67) 

0.70 (0.76) 

5.00 


6.72 

 

(a) All Samaritans have allele 190 at DYS19.  



* All Y-chromosome values calibrated as in equation (1). 

†  The average calibrated diversity is the average of the transformed values; the transformed value of the averages are 0.77 and 

0.86, respectively. 


Table 4. Y-chromosome haplotypic distances between 

sets of populations from AMOVA. 

Comparison 

Jews- 


Samaritans 

Jews- 


Palestinians 

Samaritans- 

Palestinians 

No. of different 

alleles 

0.04    (0.293) 

0.05  (0.281) 

0.15***  (<0.001) 

Sum of squared size 

differences 

0.04  (0.246) 

0.11  (0.213) 

0.35***  (<0.001) 

 

Calibrated Y-chromosome genetic distances (between-population F values reported by Arlequin). Genetic distance is 



based on the number of different alleles (top  row) or the sum of squared size differences (bottom row). *** P < 0.001. 

Ethiopians are excluded from Jews. Numbers in parentheses are the exact P values for the differentiation test as reported 

by Arlequin. 


Table 7. Estimated time of divergence between 

Samaritans and Jews, and between Samaritans and 

Palestinians (Y and autosomes) 

Divergence of

Y

Autosomes*

Samaritans- Jews

0.568   (0.411)

2029     2536

0.018   (0.07)

171.3      214

Samaritans-Palestinians

3.373   (2.115)

12,046    15,058

0.175   (0.118)

1667     2083

Top  line  gives  estimated  delta-mu-squared  for  Samaritans  from  Jews  and  for  Samaritans  from 

Palestinians  for  Y  chromosome  and  autosomes.  Figures  in  parentheses  represent  standard  errors. 

Divergence times in years (Goldstein et al. 1995) are given in the second and fourth rows with the first 

number corresponding to a generation time of 20 years and the second to a generation time of 25 years. 

 

* The effective mutation rate for autosomes is the weighted average of those for di- (0.00152), tri- 



(0.00085), and tetranucleotides (0.00093) as calculated by Zhivotovsky et al. (2000). 

Y-chromosome tree of individuals from 9 Israeli populations

  


mtDNA (maternal lineages): 16 Samaritans, 158 other Israelis 

Cohanim. Modal Y chromosome (CMH). 

50% of Cohanim have CMH (males). 

5% of other Jews have CMH (males). 

50% of Buba clan of Lemba (South Africa). 

>50% of Bene Israel (Marathi speakers from Mumbai). 

All Samaritans have CMH except the Samaritan Cohens 



Levites. A Y chromosome with probable origin in the 

Volga-Khazar region.  Khazar converts to Judaism in 8th 

or 9th century. 30

50% of Levites share this Y. 



Generally: Jewish Y chromosomes tend to be more 

Middle Eastern and mitochondria relatively local. 



Finer subdivision of CMH Y 

chromosomes 

Using 12 STRs:one SNP haplotype:  

46% of Askenazi and non-Ashkenazi Cohanim but no 

 non Jews. Dated about 3,000 years ago 

                                   A second SNP Haplotype: 

14% of all Cohanim, Dated about 4,000 years ago 

 

 



All Cohanim descend from a 

very small group of ancestors 



Jews and the World



populations 

Human Genome Diversity Cell Line Panel 

• Publicly available DNA collection administered by Centre d

Etude du 



Polymorphisme Humain (CEPH). 

 

• 1056 individuals from 52 predefined populations. 938 unrelated 



 

• Individual genotypes at about 650,000 SNPs 



Figure 1 

A 

B 


STRUCTURE results for Jewish populations combined with Middle Eastern, European, East 

Asian, and African populations from HGDP. K values of 3



7 are shown; each represents an 

alignment of 10 independent runs.  

Campbell C L et al. PNAS 2012;109:13865-13870 

©2012 by National Academy of Sciences 



Jews and Inherited Diseases 

For it was taught: If she circumcised her first and he died, and she had the 

second one circumcised and died, she must not circumcise her third child so 

stated Rabbi Judah Ha-Nasi. Rabbi Shimon ben Gamliel however said, She 

may circumcise the third child but most not circumcise the fourth if the third 

child dies. It once happened with four sisters from Tzippori, where the first had 

her son circumcised and he died, when the second sister had her son 

circumcised he died, when the third sister had her son circumcised, he also 

died and the fourth sister came before Rabbi Shimon ben Gamliel and he told 

her you must not circumcise your son. 

Talmud, order Nashim, tractate Yevamot 64b 

If a woman had her first son circumcised and he died as a result of the 

circumcision, which enfeebled his strength, and she similarly had her second 

circumcised and he died as a result of the circumcision

whether [the latter 



was] from her first husband or from her second husband

the third son may 



not be circumcised at the proper time [on the eighth day of life]. Rather one 

postpones the operation for him until he grows up and his strength is 

established. One may circumcise only a child that is totally free of disease, 

because danger to life overrides every other consideration. It is possible to 

circumcise later than the proper time, but it is impossible to restore a single 

[departed] soul of Israel forever. 

Maimonedes, from Mishneh Torah 


Small Ashkenazi founding populations 

Breast cancer: 5-10% of BC patients have BRCA 

mutations. Ashkenazi BC patients or women with family 

history of early onset BC have  much higher BRCA 

mutation rate (also Moroccan Jews). 

Fact or X1 deficiency 

(Ashkenazi and Iraqi) 

Gaucher disease 

 

(Ashkenazi and Europeans) 



Bloom

s disease 



 

(1% carrier frequency in Ash) 

Chron



s disease 



 

(highest frequency in Ash) 

Familial Mediterranean 

(in non-Ashkenazi Jews, 

   fever 

 

 



14

20% carriers) 



Nieman-Pick  

 

(one in 71 Ashkenazi are 



   

 

 



 

 carriers) 

Up to 25 

Ashkenazi



 genetic diseases. 



Tay-Sachs 

1. Traced to 15th CE Europe. 

~3



4% Ashkenazi are carriers. 



2. Another mutation in French Canadians. Almost 

all births with Tay-Sachs are French Canadian. 

Traced to a mutation in a 17th CE migrant. 

3. Irish carriers ~2%. 

4. General population 0.3%. 

             Classical founder effect 



Community 

Disorder 

Kurdistan 



G6PD deficiency



Thalassemia (alpha and beta) 

India 

Ichthyosis vulgaris (autosomal dominant) 



Thalassemia (alpha and beta) 

Iran 


Dubin-Johnson syndrome 

G6PD deficiency 

Pituitary dwarfism, type II 

Pseudocholinesterase deficiency 

Selective hypoaldosteronism 

Iraq 

Benign familial hematuria 



Bronchial asthma 

Dubin-Johnson syndrome 

FMF 

G6PD deficiency 

Glanzmann thrombasthenia 

Icthyosis vulgaris (X-linked) 

Meckel syndrome 



Pituitary dwarfism, type II 

Pseudocholinesterase deficiency 

Yemen 


Celiac disease 

Cystic disease of lung 

Metachromatic leucodystrophy in Habbanites 

PKU 


Thalassemia (alpha) 

a

 Italics indicate that the condition is found in more than one Jewish community 



Some characteristic genetic disorders among Oriental Jewry 

Genome-wide IBD sharing for the average pair of individuals within (A) and across (B and C) 

populations.  

Campbell C L et al. PNAS 2012;109:13865-13870 

©2012 by National Academy of Sciences 



Inferred IBD Statistics for Diverse 

Human Populations 

Henn et al. (2012) PLoS One 


     It is impossible for man to be endowed by 

nature from his very birth with either virtue or 

vice, just as it is impossible that he should be 

born skilled by nature in any particular art. It is 

possible, however, that through natural causes he 

may from birth be so constituted as to have a 

predilection for a particular virtue or vice, so 

that he will more readily practice it than any 

other.  For instance, a man whose natural 

constitution inclines toward dryness, whose 

brain-matter is clear and not overloaded with 

fluids, finds it much easier to learn, remember, 

and understand things than the phlegmatic man 

whose brain is encumbered with a great deal of 

humidity. But if one who inclines 

constitutionally toward a certain excellence is 

left entirely without instruction, and if his 

faculties are not stimulated, he will undoubtedly 

remain ignorant.  On the other hand, if one by 

nature is dull and phlegmatic, possessing an 

abundance of humidity, is instructed and 

enlightened, he will, though of course with 

difficulty, gradually 

Men are not born good or evil 

succeed in acquiring knowledge and 

understanding. 

     In exactly the same way, he whose blood is 

especially warm has the requisite quality to 

become a brave man. But another whose heart 

is colder than it should be, is naturally inclined 

toward cowardice and fear, so that if he should 

be encouraged to be a coward, he would easily 

become one. If, however, it be desired to make 

a brave man of him, he can without doubt 

become one, providing he receive the proper 

training which would require, of course, great 

exertion. 

     I have entered into this subject so that thou 

mayest not believe the absurd ideas of 

astrologers, who falsely assert that the 

constellation at the time of one’s birth 

determines whether one is to be virtuous or 

vicious, the individual being thus necessarily 

compelled to follow out a certain line of 

conduct. 

 

 

Moses Maimonedes 1135–1204 



Commentaries on the Mishna, Eight Chapters VIII 

References 

Samaritans 

B. Bonne-Tamir (1966) Am. J. Phys. Anthr 24: 1-19 

P. Shen et al. (2004) Human Mutation 24: 248-260 

M. Hammer et al (2009) Human Genetics 126: 707 

 717 



World 

J. Z. Li et al. (2008) Science 319: 1100-1104 

M. Jakobsson et al. (2008) Nature 457: 998-1003 

Jewish Genetics 

N. Rosenberg et al. (2001) Proc. Natl Acad. Sci. USA 98: 858-863 

N. M. Kopelman et al. (2009) BMC Genetics 10: 80-94 

D. B. Behar et al. (2010) Nature 466: 238-242 

L. C. Campbell et al. (2012) Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 109(39):  

15900-15905 

General  

David Goldstein (2008) JACOB

S LEGACY: A GENETIC VIEW OF 



JEWISH HISTORY 

Yale University Press 




Do'stlaringiz bilan baham:


Ma'lumotlar bazasi mualliflik huquqi bilan himoyalangan ©fayllar.org 2017
ma'muriyatiga murojaat qiling