To share national expectations of writing at the beginning and end of ks2


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To share national expectations of writing at the beginning and end of KS2

  • To share national expectations of writing at the beginning and end of KS2

  • To show some of the different types of writing completed at KS2

  • To explore different key elements of writing

  • To suggest ideas for helping your child at home











Traditional tales

  • Traditional tales

  • Adventure/action

  • Mystery & Suspense

  • Myths & Legends

  • Time slip/portal stories

  • Poetry

  • Play scripts



Recount – chronological report

  • Recount – chronological report

  • Non-chronological report/information text

  • Persuasive – unbalanced/biased argument

  • Discussion – balanced report

  • Explanations

  • Instructions

  • These can be in the form of:

  • • newspaper/magazine articles

  • • diary entries

  • • biographies

  • • recipes

  • • leaflets

  • • adverts



Lack of knowledge/understanding of the genre

  • Lack of knowledge/understanding of the genre

  • Lack of experience/ideas

  • Fear of getting it wrong

  • Developing initial ideas- writer’s block

  • Limited vocabulary and immature language

  • Slow handwriting speed – difficulty forming letters

  • Spelling problems including dyslexia



Creating a helpful writing environment/space

  • Creating a helpful writing environment/space

  • Offering a real purpose for writing

  • Offering an exciting selection of writing resources

  • Talking to each other to develop ideas

  • Reading to children, even after they have learnt to read for themselves

  • Modelling writing – let the children see you write for different purposes

  • Offering lots of encouragement and have fun too!



Spelling

  • Spelling

  • Grammar

  • Punctuation

  • Vocabulary

  • Handwriting

  • Composition (ideas)



Spellings – content can be found online

  • Spellings – content can be found online

  • Using look, cover, write, check

  • http://www.alanpeat.com/apps.html spelling apps available for mobile phones and tablets – some free, some small costs

  • Using dictionaries/Google for spelling (beware American English e.g. color, organize etc.).



Help children to pronounce words they’re spelling – e.g. thought rather than fought – as this will help them to sound out the word

  • Help children to pronounce words they’re spelling – e.g. thought rather than fought – as this will help them to sound out the word

  • Write out larger words and cut them up – so that ‘accommodation’ could become acco mmod ation

  • Use rhymes – Big Elephants Can Always Understand Small Elephants

  • Oh U Lucky Duck (would, should, could)

  • Count the letters in a word e.g. if a child knows ‘went’ has four letters, they’re less likely to spell it ‘whent’



Were/where/wear

  • Were/where/wear

  • They’re/their/there

  • Too/two/to

  • See/sea

  • Bare/bear

  • It’s/its

  • Accept/except

  • Off/of

  • Many more can be found in spelling appendix.



Writing standard English starts with speaking standard English

  • Writing standard English starts with speaking standard English

  • It weren’t me – It wasn’t me

  • I seen him outside – I saw him outside

  • Me nan – My nan

  • I done it – I did it

  • I never done nothing – I didn’t do anything

  • I’m good thanks – I’m well thanks

  • I would of thought you’d phone me – I would have thought you’d phone me

  • Hearing correct English will help prepare for writing



Essential to clarify meaning

  • Essential to clarify meaning



Found at beginning of sentence, beginning of speech, used for proper nouns and the pronoun I (which must always be capitalised!)

  • Found at beginning of sentence, beginning of speech, used for proper nouns and the pronoun I (which must always be capitalised!)

  • E.g. One Direction, Mr Jones, Calvin Harris, McDonalds, Arsenal Football Club, Germany, Monday, March

  • Common error in writing to miss these out



Let’s recap:

  • Let’s recap:

  • Full stops – to mark the end of a sentence

  • Exclamation marks – for an exclamation e.g. How wonderful! Or to be used when something is really, really exciting, sad, shocking, funny etc



Question marks – to indicate questions

  • Question marks – to indicate questions

  • Commas – used to separate items in a list, or to separate clauses to clarify meaning

  • Apostrophes – used to indicate a missing letter or possession e.g. They’re going away or Hannah’s bag



Brackets, commas, dashes – used to mark out additional information or asides

  • Brackets, commas, dashes – used to mark out additional information or asides

  • Semi-colons – can replace a conjunction and join two related sentences e.g. Some people love football; others cannot bear it

  • Colons – can introduce a list or again join two ideas together e.g. You are left with only one option: keep going until you have finished it.





Most children can use it confidently for contraction – don’t, it’s, we’re, didn’t, I’m

  • Most children can use it confidently for contraction – don’t, it’s, we’re, didn’t, I’m

  • Struggle more with possession – tend to start using it everywhere where there is an s





Indicate omission (contraction) or possession e.g.

  • Indicate omission (contraction) or possession e.g.

  • My brother’s coat is red.

  • I’m going to Nan’s house.

  • The horses’ saddles were all brown.

  • Last example indicates more than one horse.



When reading books together, point out punctuation and see if children understand why it has been used in those places

  • When reading books together, point out punctuation and see if children understand why it has been used in those places

  • If children show you writing which hasn’t been correctly punctuated, read it back as they have written it e.g.

  • Yesterday I went out shopping I bought eggs bread and milk I spent all of my money on it and I didn’t get any change

  • Rehearse talking through sentences before writing them down



Be clear on what is and isn’t a sentence e.g. I went to the zoo it was fun. – Is this one sentence or two?

  • Be clear on what is and isn’t a sentence e.g. I went to the zoo it was fun. – Is this one sentence or two?



Challenge children to use more precise or more ambitious vocabulary

  • Challenge children to use more precise or more ambitious vocabulary

  • Use a thesaurus – a hard copy or an online version

  • When children come across unknown words in books, allow them to find out meanings

  • Banning certain words e.g. nice, said, good





Push children for description - for example, how could they make the following sentence more interesting?

  • Push children for description - for example, how could they make the following sentence more interesting?

  • The dog chased the cat.

  • Explain in more detail what words mean – e.g. if asked ‘What does gigantic mean?’ say more than just "big." Also provide a comparison: An elephant is "big" when compared to a person, but "gigantic" when compared to an ant.

  • Apps – e.g. 7 little words





Making writing interesting- coming up with original ideas (or coherent ones!!)

  • Making writing interesting- coming up with original ideas (or coherent ones!!)

  • Reading fiction widely

  • Reading non-fiction will help when it comes to writing non-fiction genres



TALK comes before writing

  • TALK comes before writing

  • Composition can be the most difficult aspect

  • Children need to write for real purposes as well as imagined ones e.g. a thank you letter to a family member, a diary entry about a family day out, instructions for a game or recipe, stories and poems to entertain, emails…

  • Reading with and talking to your child are the best ways to develop their vocabulary.



Discuss initial ideas and opinions

  • Discuss initial ideas and opinions

  • Think about the content – what will be included?

  • How could it be organised on the page? What kind of format could be used?

  • Briefly plan out the structure of the writing 

  • Use story mapping techniques

  • Use arrows, dashes, pictures – anything to help make links between ideas.





We follow a Penpals scheme at Christ Church to help children develop a fluent and legible style

  • We follow a Penpals scheme at Christ Church to help children develop a fluent and legible style

  • Ensure children using correct case of letters –common error is using J instead of j e.g. enJoy

  • You can support at home by helping children to practise spellings and modelling tidy handwriting




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