United nations e


Download 4.27 Mb.
Pdf просмотр
bet1/68
Sana17.03.2017
Hajmi4.27 Mb.
  1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   ...   68

UNITED 

NATIONS

 

 

 

 

 



Economic and Social 

Council

 

 

 

 



 

Distr. 


GENERAL 

 

E/CN.4/2004/56/Add.1 



23 March 2004 

 

ENGLISH/FRENCH/SPANISH 

ONLY 

 

 



COMMISSION ON HUMAN RIGHTS 

Sixtieth session 

Item 11 (a) of the provisional agenda 

 

 



CIVIL AND POLITICAL RIGHTS, INCLUDING THE QUESTIONS OF: 

TORTURE AND DETENTION 

 

Torture and other cruel, inhuman or degrading treatment or punishment 

 

Report of the Special Rapporteur, Theo van Boven 

 

Addendum 

 

Summary of information, including individual cases, transmitted to 

Governments and replies received

*

 



                                                 

*

 The present document is being circulated in the languages of submission only as it 

greatly exceeds the page limitations currently imposed by the relevant General 

Assembly resolutions

 

GE.04-12267 



E/CN.4/2004/56/Add.1 

page 2 


 

Contents 

 

 



Paragraphs Page 

Introduction………….…………………………………………… 

General remarks………….……………………………………… 

Summary of cases transmitted and replies 

received………….……………………. 

Albania………………………………………………................... 

Algeria…………………………………………………………… 

Angola……………………………………………………….…… 

Argentina………………………………………………………… 

Australia......................................................................................... 

Austria…………………………………………………………… 

Azerbaijan...................................................................................... 

Bahrain………………………………………………………… 

Bangladesh………………………………………………………. 

Belarus…………………………………………………………… 

Belgium………………………………………………………….. 

Belize…………………………………………………………….. 

Bolivia…………………………………………………………… 

Bosnia and Herzegovina………………………………………… 

Brazil…………………………………………………………….. 

Bulgaria………………………………………………………….. 

Burundi…………………………………………………………... 

Cambodia………………………………………………………… 

Cameroon………………………………………………………… 

Canada……………………………………………………………. 

Central African Republic………………………………………… 

Chad……………………………………………………………… 

Chile……………………………………………………………… 

China……………………………………………………………... 

Colombia…………………………………………………………. 

Congo…………………………………………………………….. 

Côte d’Ivoire……………………………………………………… 

Croatia……………………………………………………………. 

Cuba………………………………………………………………. 

Czech Republic…………………………………………………… 

Democratic Republic of the Congo………………………………. 

Djibouti…………………………………………………………… 

Dominican Republic………………………………………………. 

Ecuador……………………………………………………………. 

Egypt………………………………………………………………. 

Equatorial Guinea…………………………………………………. 

Eritrea……………………………………………………………… 

Ethiopia……………………………………………………………. 

France……………………………………………………………… 

Gambia…………………………………………………………….. 

Georgia……………………………………………………………. 

Greece……………………………………………………………… 

Guatemala…………………………………………………………. 

1-4 

5-8 


 

9-1976 


9-19 

20-32 


33-59 

60-71 


72 

73 


74-119 

120-122 


123-139 

140 


141-155 

156 


157-166 

167-168 


169-195 

196-218 


219-232 

233-234 


235-239 

240 


241 

242 


243-245 

246-472 


473-492 

493 


494-497 

498-499 


500-513 

514-515 


516-542 

543 


544-545 

546-548 


549-622 

623-628 


629-636 

637-641 


642-645 

646-647 


648-649 

650-663 


664-666 



 



11 


14 

17 


18 

18 


25 

25 


29 

29 


32 

33 


35 

35 


41 

44 


47 

48 


49 

50 


50 

50 


51 

87 


92 

92 


93 

94 


97 

97 


102 

102 


103 

104 


119 

121 


124 

125 


126 

127 


128 

131 


E/CN.4/2004/56/Add.1 

Page 3 


 

Contents (continued

 

 



Paragraphs Page 

Guinea……………………………………………………………. 

Guinea-Bissau…………………………………………………… 

Haiti………………………………………………………………. 

Honduras…………………………………………………………. 

India………………………………………………………………. 

Indonesia…………………………………………………………. 

Iran (Islamic Republic of) ……………………………………...... 

Israel……………………………………………………………… 

Italy……………………………………………………………….. 

Jamaica……………………………………………………………. 

Japan………………………………………………………………. 

Jordan……………………………………………………………... 

Kazakhstan………………………………………………………… 

Kenya……………………………………………………………... 

Kyrgyzstan..………………………………………………………. 

Lao People’s Democratic Republic…………………………….….. 

Lebanon……………………………………………………………. 

Liberia……………………………………………………………. 

Libyan Arab Jamahiriya.………………………………...……….. 

Malaysia……………………………………………………….…. 

Maldives………………………………………………………….. 

Mali………………………………………………………………. 

Mauritania………………………………………………………… 

Mauritius….………………………………………………………. 

Mexico……………………………………………………………. 

Mongolia…………………………………………………………. 

Morocco…………………………………………………………… 

Mozambique……………………………………………………… 

Myanmar…………………………………………………………. 

Namibia…………………………………………………………… 

Nepal………………………………………………………………. 

Niger……………………………………………………………… 

Nigeria…………………………………………………………… 

Pakistan…………………………………………………………… 

Paraguay…………………………………………………………… 

Peru………………………………………………………………… 

Philippines………………………………………………………… 

Qatar……………………………………………………………… 

Republic of Korea……………………………………………… 

Romania…………………………………………………………… 

Russian Federation………………………………………………… 

Rwanda…………………………………………………………… 

Saudi Arabia………………………………………………..……… 

Senegal…………………………………………………………… 

Serbia and Montenegro….………………………………………… 

667 

668-670 


671-677 

678-682 


683-727 

728-805 


806-834 

835-885 


886-888 

889-893 


894-900 

901-902 


903-907 

908-915 


916-922 

923-925 


926-937 

938-939 


940-948 

949-969 


970-971 

972 


973-979 

980-981 


982-1020 

1021 


1022-1029 

1030-1032 

1033-1075 

1076-1094 

1095-1274 

1275-1276 

1277-1279 

1280-1291 

1292-1303 

1304-1314 

1315-1329 

1330 


1331-1337 

1338-1361 

1362-1402 

1403-1407 

1408-1421 

1422 


1423-1442 

131 


131 

132 


133 

135 


144 

157 


164 

179 


180 

181 


182 

183 


184 

185 


187 

188 


191 

192 


193 

198 


199 

199 


201 

201 


210 

211 


212 

213 


219 

222 


240 

261 


261 

264 


266 

269 


272 

272 


274 

278 


286 

287 


290 

290 


 

E/CN.4/2004/56/Add.1 

page 4 


 

Contents (concluded

 

 



Paragraphs Page 

Sierra Leone………………………………………………………. 

Slovakia…………………………………………………………… 

Spain……………………………………………………………… 

Sri Lanka………………………………………………………….. 

Sudan……………………………………………………………… 

Sweden…………………………………………………………… 

Switzerland………………………………………………………… 

Syrian Arab Republic……………………………………...………. 

Tajikistan………………………………………………………… 

Thailand…………………………………………………………… 

Togo……………………………………………….……………… 

Tunisia……………………………………………………………. 

Turkey……………………………………………………………. 

Turkmenistan……………………………………………………… 

Uganda……………………………………………………………. 

Ukraine……………………………………………………………. 

United Arab Emirates……………………………………...………. 

United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland…..………. 

United Republic of Tanzania……………………………...………. 

United States of America………………………………….………. 

Uruguay………….………………………………………………… 

Uzbekistan………………………………………………………… 

Venezuela………………………………………………….………. 

Viet Nam…………………………………………………..………. 

Yemen………………………………...…………………………… 

Zambia…………………………………………………………….. 

Zimbabwe…………………………………………………………. 

Information transmitted to the Palestinian Authority……………… 

Information transmitted to the Special Representative of the 

Secretary-General in Kosovo………………………………… 

Information transmitted to the Secretary-General of the United 

Nations.……………………….…………………………… 

Information received from the North Atlantic Treaty Organization 

(NATO).……………………….…………………………… 

 

1443 



1444-1445 

1446-1460 

1461-1577 

1578-1648 

1649-1650 

1651-1654 

1655-1676 

1677 


1678-1681 

1682-1684 

1685-1713 

1714-1787 

1788-1796 

1797-1799 

1800-1801 

1802-1805 

1806-1808 

1809 


1810-1832 

1833-1834 

1835-1921 

1922-1933 

1934-1944 

1945-1948 

1949-1950 

1951-1976 

1977 

 

1978-1980 



 

1981-1982 

 

198-1984 



293 

294 


294 

299 


327 

346 


347 

349 


353 

353 


355 

355 


362 

377 


380 

380 


381 

382 


382 

383 


390 

391 


410 

411 


414 

414 


415 

419 


 

419 


 

420 


 

420 


 

E/CN.4/2004/56/Add.1 

Page 5 


Introduction 

1. 


This addendum to the report of the Special Rapporteur contains, on a 

country-by-country basis, summaries of general allegations and individual cases, as 

well as of urgent appeals, and government replies. The Special Rapporteur would like 

to recall that in transmitting allegations and urgent appeals to Governments, he does 

not make any judgement concerning the merits of the cases, nor does he support the 

opinion and activities of the persons on behalf of whom he intervenes. The prohibition 

of torture and other cruel, inhuman or degrading treatment or punishment is a 

non-derogable right, and every human being is legally and morally entitled to 

protection. When the Special Rapporteur receives reliable information that gives 

grounds to fear that a person may be at risk of torture or other forms of ill-treatment, 

he may transmit an urgent appeal to the Government concerned. The urgent appeals 

sent by the Special Rapporteur have a humanitarian and preventive purpose, and do 

not require the exhaustion of domestic remedies. The letters sent to Governments 

contain summaries of individual cases of torture and, where applicable, include 

general references to the phenomenon of torture. In these letters, the Special 

Rapporteur requests the Government concerned to clarify the substance of the 

allegations and urges it to take steps to investigate them, prosecute and impose 

appropriate sanctions on any persons guilty of torture. 

 

2. 


Observations by the Special Rapporteur have also been included where 

applicable. Such observations, which sometimes note the most recent findings of other 

supervisory bodies, in particular United Nations treaty bodies, are usually made when 

the information suggests that there may be a problem extending beyond the 

exceptional or isolated incident. The fact that there is no such observation in respect 

of a particular country merely reflects the state of information brought to the attention 

of the mandate, and does not necessarily mean that there is no substantial problem in 

that country. 

 

3. 


During the period under review, i.e. from 15 December 2002 to 

15 December 2003, the Special Rapporteur sent 154 letters to 76 countries. The 

Special Rapporteur also sent 71 letters reminding Governments of a number of cases 

that had been transmitted in previous years, and 369 urgent appeals to 80 

Governments on behalf of individuals with regard to whom serious fears had been 

expressed that they might be subjected to torture and other forms of ill-treatment. 

 

4. 


Owing to restrictions on the length of documents, the Special Rapporteur has 

been obliged to reduce considerably details of communications sent and received. As 

a result, requests from Governments to publish their replies in their totality could not 

be acceded to. Information concerning the follow-up by Governments to the 

country-visit recommendations of the Special Rapporteur is included in document 

E/CN.4/2004/56/Add.3. 

 

GENERAL REMARKS 

 

5. 



The Special Rapporteur appreciates the timely responses received from 

Governments to the letters and urgent appeals transmitted. He regrets that many 

Governments fail to respond, or do so selectively, and that responses to older cases 

remain outstanding in large part. 



E/CN.4/2004/56/Add.1 

page 6 


6. 

The Special Rapporteur notes that Government responses frequently point to 

the absence of formal complaints as the reason for not initiating investigations, and to 

legal provisions for the prohibition of torture as guaranteeing protection. He 

emphasizes that even in the absence of formal complaints, Governments have the 

obligation to thoroughly investigate all torture cases. Moreover, guarantees of the 

prohibition of torture laid down in constitutional or legislative provisions without 

mechanisms to effectively monitor their application—including appropriate 

mechanisms to receive complaints of torture or ill-treatment (e.g. child-friendly, 

gender-sensitive), conduct investigations and carry out prosecutions—do not on their 

own ensure protection. 

 

7. 



In relation to cases of torture and ill-treatment, the Special Rapporteur would 

like to draw the attention of Governments to two issues of particular importance and 

concern. With reference to Commission on Human Rights resolution 2003/32 

(para. 14), he reminds all States that detention of persons in an undisclosed location, 

as well as prolonged incommunicado detention, may facilitate the perpetration of 

torture and can itself constitute a form of cruel, inhuman or degrading treatment or 

even torture. 

 

8. 



With reference to article 37 of the Convention on the Rights of the Child and 

Commission on Human Rights resolution 2003/32 (para. 5), the Special Rapporteur 

reminds Governments that corporal punishment, including of children, can amount to 

cruel, inhuman or degrading punishment or even to torture. Moreover, lengthy 

pre-trial detention, the use of detention other than as a measure of last resort, and the 

detention of children together with adults, may facilitate the perpetration of torture or 

ill-treatment against children. 

SUMMARY OF CASES TRANSMITTED AND REPLIES RECEIVED 

Albania 

9. 


Par une lettre datée du 4 juin 2003, le Rapporteur spécial a informé le 

gouvernement qu’il avait reçu des renseignements sur les cas individuels suivants, 

auxquels le gouvernement a répondu par une lettre datée du 3 novembre 2003. 

10. 


Sabaudin Cela aurait été arrêté le 12 février 2002 et emmené au poste de 

police de Vlora. Lors de son interrogatoire, il aurait été frappé sur la paume des mains 

et des pieds par le chef de la police judiciaire et trois autres officiers. Il aurait 

finalement été relâché sans avoir été inculpé. Le 5 mars 2002, il aurait à nouveau été 

arrêté par le même officier qui l’aurait forcé, un pistolet sur la tempe, à entrer dans 

une voiture sans plaque d’immatriculation. Il aurait eu le visage couvert durant la 

durée du trajet jusqu’à une banlieue de Vlora. Là, il aurait été frappé avec la crosse 

d’une arme et des bâtons. Il aurait été plus tard abandonné inconscient près de son 

domicile. 

11. 


Le gouvernement a informé que, suite à une plainte portée contre le chef du 

bureau régional de la lutte anticrime, le bureau du procureur de Vlora avait initié une 

procédure pénale et ledit chef avait été arrêté. 

12. 


Arjan Seiti aurait été arrêté dans un bar le 2 novembre 2002 par des 

policiers du commissariat n

o

 3 de Tirana suite à une dispute qu’il aurait eue avec le  



E/CN.4/2004/56/Add.1 

Page 7 


garde de sécurité de ce bar qui serait également un policier. Ce dernier aurait appelé 

ses collègues en renfort. Au commissariat, Arjan Seiti aurait été violemment battu. Un 

certificat médical émis le 3 novembre 2002 confirmerait ces allégations. 

13. 


Le gouvernement a clarifié qu’Arjan Seiti, qui était en état d’ébriété lors de 

l’incident et qui aurait importuné une femme, se serait refusé à accompagner les 

agents de police au commissariat et aurait donné un coup de poing à deux d’entre eux. 

Il aurait donc été amené par la force au poste de police. Les deux agents de police 

frappés auraient porté plainte contre lui. Quelques jours plus tard, Arjan Seiti aurait à 

son tour porté plainte contre ces deux agents, et une procédure pénale pour avoir 

commis des actions arbitraires aurait été initiée contre ceux-ci par le bureau du 

procureur. Le gouvernement a également informé qu’un des agents impliqués avait 

été renvoyé du poste de police pour transgressions disciplinaires graves. 

14. 


Gazment Tahirllari aurait été arrêté le 3 janvier 2003 par des policiers de 

Tirana suite à une plainte déposée par sa femme pour violences conjugales. Il aurait 

refusé de suivre les policiers et ceux-ci l’auraient alors frappé violemment, en 

particulier sur la tête. Il aurait perdu connaissance. Il aurait alors été emmené dans un 

véhicule de la police à un hôpital. Il y serait décédé peu de temps après son admission. 

Malgré le fait que les blessures occasionnées par les coups étaient visibles, en 

particulier sur le crâne, le visage et les membres, le premier certificat d’autopsie 

mentionnerait un usage excessif d’alcool et un traumatisme non identifié comme 

causes de la mort. Sa famille n’aurait pu voir le corps qu’un jour après son décès, 

lorsque les forces de police auraient finalement quitté l’hôpital. 

15. 

Le gouvernement a clarifié que Gazment Tahirllari avait montré de la 



résistance alors qu’il était amené au poste de police de Korça. Les agents de police 

avaient remarqué qu’il ne se sentait pas bien et l’avaient emmené à l’hôpital civil de 

Korça, où il décéda le jour suivant. Immédiatement après cet incident, trois agents 

furent licenciés par le Département de la police de Korça. Le gouvernement a 

également informé que le tribunal de première instance de Korça a condamné un des 

agents à 16 ans de prison, un autre à trois ans de prison, un troisième à cinq mois de 

prison et deux autres à quatre mois de prison. 

16. 


Lorenc Callo aurait reçu des coups de poing et de pied de la part d’un agent 

de police de la ville de Pogradec en mars 2001. Ce dernier l’aurait soupçonné d’avoir 

tiré un coup de feu. Il aurait également été frappé avec un appareil radio, ce qui lui 

aurait provoqué une blessure à l’œil gauche. Des témoins ainsi qu’un examen médico-

légal auraient confirmé ces allégations. L’ombudsman aurait recommandé le renvoi de 

l’agent de police concerné. 

17. 

Le gouvernement a informé qu’une procédure pénale contre un capitaine a 



été initiée par le bureau du procureur de Korça en avril 2001. La procédure avait été 

poursuivie par le tribunal militaire de Korça qui avait déclaré ledit capitaine coupable 

d’abus de pouvoir. Celui-ci avait été condamné à une amende. 

18. 


Par une lettre datée du 8 octobre 2003, le Rapporteur spécial a rappelé au 

gouvernement un certain nombre de cas qu’il avait envoyés en 2001 et 1999, au sujet 

desquels il n’avait pas reçu de réponse. 


E/CN.4/2004/56/Add.1 

page 8 


Observations 

19. 


The Special Rapporteur considers it appropriate to draw attention to the 

concerns expressed by the Committee on the Elimination of Racial Discrimination 

(CERD/C/63/CO/1, para. 18) about information that members of the Roma minority

especially the young, are generally regarded with suspicion and subjected to 

ill-treatment and the improper use of force by police officers. 

Algeria 

20. 


Par une lettre datée du 24 septembre 2003, le Rapporteur spécial, 

conjointement avec le Rapporteur spécial sur la promotion et la protection du droit à 

la liberté d’opinion et d’expression, a informé le gouvernement qu’il avait reçu des 

renseignements selon lesquels près de 400 personnes qui se seraient rassemblées le 

26 mars 2003 à Alger en soutien aux familles de personnes disparues auraient été 

violemment dispersées par les forces de l’ordre. Des mères de disparus, parmi 

lesquelles des femmes âgées, auraient été maltraitées par la police et certaines d’entre 

elles se seraient évanouies. Une journaliste de nationalité hollandaise aurait été 

malmenée, et ses films confisqués. Cinq personnes auraient été arrêtées et gardées 

dans les fourgons de la police avant d’être relâchées peu après. Le rassemblement 

aurait été bloqué devant le siège de la Commission nationale consultative de 

promotion et de protection des droits de l’homme (CNCPPDH), et les participants 

empêchés de se rendre devant la présidence de la République. Plus tard, des agents de 

la compagnie républicaine de sécurité auraient assailli les familles des personnes 

disparues alors même qu’elles s’apprêtaient à rejoindre le siège de leur association. 

Des faits similaires se seraient déjà produits dans le passé. En particulier, le 

6 novembre 2002, une trentaine de membres de familles de disparus s’étaient réunis 

devant la CNCPPDH et se seraient étaient ensuite dirigés vers la présidence de la 

République. Les familles auraient alors été bloquées dans leur marche par les forces 

de l’ordre. Certaines personnes auraient été par la suite bousculées et battues. Tout le 

quartier aurait ensuite été quadrillé par les services de sécurité. Ce rassemblement du 

6 novembre aurait fait suite aux déclarations du président de la CNCPPDH, qui se 

serait prononcé sur la manière de régler le problème des disparus. 

21. 


Par une lettre datée du 30 septembre 2003, le Rapporteur spécial a informé 

le gouvernement qu’il avait reçu des renseignements selon lesquels Tahar Façouli 

aurait été arrêté à Surcouf aux alentours du 10 avril 2002 par des agents en civil de la 

sécurité militaire, et emmené dans une base à proximité d’Alger où il serait resté en 

détention pendant une semaine avant d’être remis en liberté. Au cours de sa détention, 

les agents de la sécurité militaire auraient tenté de lui extorquer des informations sur 

ses relations avec Rachid Mesli, un avocat algérien défenseur des droits humains 

vivant en exil en Suisse. Tahar Façouli aurait été battu à plusieurs reprises et maintenu 

dans un bain d’eau froide pendant quatre jours consécutifs, le corps immobilisé de 

manière telle qu’il n’aurait été en mesure de ne sortir que la tête de l’eau. 

22. 

Par une lettre datée du 6 novembre 2003, le gouvernement a signalé que 



Tahar Façouli n’avait pas saisi les autorités judiciaires concernant des allégations de 

torture ni déposé de plainte devant la justice. Dans ces conditions, les autorités 

judiciaires n’étaient pas en mesure de se prononcer sur le fondement de telles 

allégations. 



E/CN.4/2004/56/Add.1 

Page 9 


23. 

Par une lettre datée du 15 octobre 2003, le Rapporteur spécial a informé le 

gouvernement qu’il avait reçu des renseignements selon lesquels des actes qui 

relèvent de son mandat auraient été perpétrés par des agents de la Sécurité militaire 

dans des centres de l’armée, notamment ceux de Ben Aknoun à Alger et de Haouch 

Chnou à Blida. Ces agents auraient opéré en civil, n’auraient présenté aucun mandat 

d’arrêt et auraient transporté des personnes les yeux bandés et recroquevillées à 

l’arrière de véhicules sans plaques d’immatriculation. Sur les procès-verbaux 

d’interrogatoire, seuls auraient été indiqués les prénoms des agents de la sécurité 

militaire ayant participé à l’interrogatoire. Les personnes auraient été forcées de 

signer des déclarations qu’elles n’auraient pas lues et les condamnations souvent 

auraient reposé largement, voire exclusivement sur les déclarations obtenues sous la 

contrainte pendant la détention. 

24. 


Par cette même lettre, le Rapporteur spécial a informé le gouvernement que, 

dans ce contexte, il avait reçu des renseignements sur les cas individuels suivants, 

auxquels le gouvernement a répondu par une lettre datée du 19 novembre 2003. 

25. 



Do'stlaringiz bilan baham:
  1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   ...   68


Ma'lumotlar bazasi mualliflik huquqi bilan himoyalangan ©fayllar.org 2019
ma'muriyatiga murojaat qiling