Virgin of the Immaculate Conception Valencia 1772 1850 Madrid


Download 19.43 Kb.
Sana08.07.2018
Hajmi19.43 Kb.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Vicente López Y PortañaVirgin of the Immaculate Conception  

Valencia 1772 – 1850 Madrid 

 

oil on canvas, circa 1795-1800 



73 by 42 ½ inches (185 by 107 cm) 

 

 



provenance:  

Vicente Lassala, Valencia, by 1926;  

by descent in the Lassala family 

 

exhibited:  



Vicente López: Su Vida, Su Arte, Su Tiempo, Centro Escolar y Mercantil, Valencia, 1926, no. 5.  

El Arte en España, Expositión Internacional de Barcelona, Palacio Nacional, Barcelona, 1929, p. 

549, room XXXVIII, no. 26. 

 

literature: 



 L. Morales y Marin, Vicente López, Zaragoza, 1980, p. 121, no. 407.  

Jose Luis Diez, Vicente López (1772-1850), Madrid, 1999, vol. 1, p. 267; vol. 2, p. 26, no. P. 58, 

rep. p. 532.  

Idem, La Pintura Española del Siglo XIX en el Museo Lázaro Galdiano, Madrid, 2005, p. 174. 

 

note: 


Vicente López was, after Goya, the most prolific and prestigious Spanish painter of the nineteenth 

century. Like his fellow court painter Goya, whose portrait he painted, Lopez was influenced early 

in his career by the classical style of the earlier court painter, Anton Raphael Mengs (d. 1779), 

who had twice visited Madrid and made a lasting impression on Spanish painters. López entered 

the Academy of Fine Arts in his native Valencia at age thirteen, and his talent was quickly evident, 

so that he received a grant to attend the Academy of San Fernando in Madrid. There his teachers 

included the Valencian born Mariano Salvador Maella (1739-1819), who appointed court painter 

in Madrid in 1774, was to have a significant influence on his development. In 1792 López 

returned to Valencia where he was made vice-director of painting at the Academy and in 1801 he 

became director general. It was in 1814 that the artist was summoned to Madrid to become court 

painter for Ferdinand VII, and he remained there for the rest of his long career, painting in oil and 

fresco portraits, allegory, myth and history, as well as religious subjects.       

 

As has been observed, “Vicente López was one of the few painters of his day to commit himself 



with real fervor to religious subjects.”

1

 He understood the approach of the Golden Age Spanish 



Masters of the Baroque period such as Murillo (fig. 1) and brought to their subjects a new 

devotion inspired by the example of Maella (fig. 2).

2

 This is especially evident in the present 



painting of his early Valencian period, one of what would be his many depictions of the heavenly 

Virgin. This particular subject, known in Spanish simply as the “Immaculada,” celebrates the 

doctrine of the Immaculate Conception, which holds that the Virgin Mary was the pure vessel who 

conceived Jesus Christ without original sin. According to the long established iconography, 

derived from the description in St, John’s Book of Revelations, it shows her “robed with sun,” 

wearing a white dress and blue cape, standing on the crescent moon, crushing a snake, 

representing Satan and heresy, in this case a fire-breathing, winged serpent, and surrounded by 

angels, with the dove of the Holy Spirit above her halo of twelve stars. This is López’s largest and 

most sublime rendering of the theme. The Virgin is given a pose connoting her great humility, and 

the symmetry of López’s composition makes her the calm focal point. The two angels flanking her 

are the most polished, neo-classical elements of the composition. The one at the right holds 

sheaves of wheat and a bouquet of flowers, all elements symbolic of the Virgin’s purity. The angel 

on the left, posed like a classical caryatid, carries a basket of flowers on its head. This rather 


sensual being was repeated later by López in another Immaculada now in a private collection, 

Madrid (figs. 3a and b)

3

 and also reappears in a secular context in his Flora and Cephalus (fig. 4).



4

 

This grand altarpiece painting must have been intended for a church or a large private chapel. The 



painting is in a fine, original gilt wood frame, and the stretcher is inscribed “July 8.18.1800.” 

According to the Vicente López scholar J. L. Diez, this point of time slightly post-dates the 

painting and perhaps records the date when the work was installed.   

 

A rough, preparatory oil study of the present work is in the Museo Lázaro Galdiano (fig. 5).



5

 A 


related drawing was in the Mariano Quintanilla collection in Segovia,

6

 and a reduced replica is in 



a private collection in Alicante (fig. 6).

7

 The painting itself had long been in the distinguished 



Lassala collection of Valencia, which housed many other early religious works by López and 

perhaps this painting was commissioned by them.   

1

 José Luis Morales y Marin, “López y Portaña,” Oxford Art Online. 



2

 See the exhibition catalogue Vicente López: 1772-1850, Museo Municipal, Madrid, 1989, p. 159. 

3

 Diez, 1999, vol. 1, p. 286; and vol. 2, p. 18, no. P-72; and Madrid, 1989, pp. 260-61, no. 59. 



4

 Diez, 1999, vol. 1, p. 299 and vol. 2, p. 68, nos. P-295-296, ills. p. 738. 

5

 Diez, 1999, vol. 2, no. P-60; and idem 2005, pp. 174-75.  



6

 Diez, 1999, vol. 2, p. 315, no. D-109. 



7

 Diez, 1999, vol. 2, pp. 126-27, no. P-59. 






Do'stlaringiz bilan baham:


Ma'lumotlar bazasi mualliflik huquqi bilan himoyalangan ©fayllar.org 2017
ma'muriyatiga murojaat qiling