W. K. Rontgen, “the x-­‐rays” (1895) 1


Download 51.98 Kb.
Pdf просмотр
Sana17.01.2018
Hajmi51.98 Kb.

 

1  


Primary  Source  12.5  

 

W.  K.  RONTGEN,  “THE  X-­‐RAYS”  (1895)



1

 

 

It  seemed  that  nothing  in  the  natural  world  could  stop  the  West’s  progress.  Western  

scientists,  engineers,  and  inventors  appeared  able  to  surmount  every  obstacle  and  to  

find   solutions   to   every   problem.   Even   the   invisible   realms   revealed   their   secrets   to  

them.   On   November   8,   1895,   while   experimenting   with   electric   current   flow,   the  

German  scientist  Wilhelm  Röntgen  (1845–1923)  produced  and  detected  radiation  on  

the   electromagnetic   spectrum   in   a   wavelength   range   now   known   as   X-­‐rays   or—in  

many  countries—Röntgen  rays.  For  this  achievement  he  won  the  first  Nobel  Prize  in  

Physics   in   1901.   In   addition   to   medical   uses,   including   radiography   and   radiation  

therapy,  X-­‐rays  were  also  found  to  help  determine  the  structure  of  crystals,  to  test  the  

soundness  of  diverse  materials,  and  of  course  to  screen  passengers  in  airports.  

In   the   passages   below,   Röntgen   describes   the   systematic   observations   and  

experiments   by   which   he   confirmed   the   existence   and   behavior   of   X-­‐rays   and   his  

hypotheses  as  to  their  nature.  His  careful  use  of  the  scientific  method  is  clearly  shown.  

For  the  full  text  online,  click  

here

.  

 

THE  X-­‐RAYS  



 

By  W.  C.  RÖNTGEN  

 

I.—UPON  A  NEW  KIND  OF  RAYS    



 

1.  If  the  discharge  of  a  great  Ruhmkorff

2

 induction  coil  be  passed  through  a  



Hittorf

3

 vacuum-­‐tube,   or   a   Lenard



4

 tube,   Crookes

5

 tube,   or   similar   apparatus  



containing   a   sufficiently   high   vacuum,   then,   the   tube   being   covered   with   a   close  

layer  of  thin  black  pasteboard  and  the  room  darkened,  a  paper  screen  covered  on  

one  side  with  barium-­‐platinum  cyanide  and  brought  near  the  apparatus  will  be  seen  

to   glow   brightly   and   fluoresce   at   each   discharge   whichever   side   of   the   screen   is  

toward   the   vacuum   tube.   The   fluorescence   is   visible   even   when   the   screen   is  

removed  to  a  distance  of  2  meters  from  the  apparatus.  

The  observer  may  easily  satisfy  himself  that  the  cause  of  the  fluorescence

6

 is  



to  be  found  at  the  vacuum  tube  and  at  no  other  part  of  the  electrical  circuit.  

                                                                                                               

1

 W.  C.  Röntgen,  “The  X-­‐Rays,”  in  Annual  Report  of  the  Board  of  Regents  of  the  Smithsonian  Institution  



(Washington:  Government  Printing  Office,  1898),  137–39,  141,  142,  143.  

2

 Heinrich  Daniel  Ruhmkorff  (1803–77)  devised  an  induction  coil  used  to  produce  high-­‐voltage  



current  from  a  low-­‐voltage  supply.  

3

 Johann  Wilhelm  Hittorf  (1824–1914)  was  a  German  physicist  who  successfully  calculated  the  



electric  capacity  of  charged  atoms  and  ions.  

4

 Philipp  Eduard  Anton  von  Lenard  (1862–1947)  was  a  German  physicist  who  won  a  Nobel  Prize  for  



Physics  in  1905  for  his  research  on  cathode  rays.  

5

 William  Crookes  (1832–1919)  was  a  British  chemist  and  physicist  who  developed  a  device  that  



controls  electric  current  in  a  container.  

6

 The  emission  of  light  by  a  substance  that  has  absorbed  light  or  other  electromagnetic  radiation.  



 

2  


2.   It   is   thus   apparent   that   there   is   here   an   agency   which   is   able   to   pass  

through  the  black  pasteboard  impenetrable  to  visible  or  ultra  violet  rays  from  the  

sun   or   the   electric   arc,   and   having   passed   through   is   capable   of   exciting   a   lively  

fluorescence,   and   it   is   natural   to   inquire   whether   other   substances   can   be   thus  

penetrated.  

It   is   found   that   all   substances   transmit   this   agency,   but   in   very   different  

degree.  I  will  mention  some  examples.  Paper  is  very  transmissible.  

I  observed  fluorescence  very  distinctly  behind  a  bound  book  of  about  1,000  

pages.  The  ink  presented  no  appreciable  obstacle.  Similarly  fluorescence  was  seen  

behind  double  whist

7

 pack.  A  single  card  held  between  the  fluorescent  screen  and  



the   apparatus   produced   no   visible   effect.   A   single   sheet   of   tin   foil,   too,   produces  

hardly   any   obstacle,   and   it   is   only   when   several   sheets   are   superposed   that   their  

shadow   appears   distinctly   on   the   screen.   Thick   wooden   blocks   are   transmissible.  

Slabs  of  pine  2  or  3  centimeters  thick  absorb  only  very  little.  A  plate  of  aluminum  

about   15   millimeters   thick   diminished   the   effect   very   considerably,   but   did   not  

cause   the   fluorescence   to   entirely   disappear.   Blocks   of   hard   rubber   several  

centimeters  thick  still  transmitted  the  rays.  

Glass  plates  of  equal  thickness  behave  very  differently  according  to  whether  

they  contain  lead  (flint  glass)  or  not.  The  first  class  are  much  less  transmissible  than  

the  second.  

If  the  hand  is  held  between  the  vacuum  tube  and  the  screen,  the  dark  shadow  

of   the   bones   is   seen   upon   the   much   lighter   shadow   outline   of   the   hand.   Water,  

carbon,   bisulphide,   and   various   other   liquids   investigated   proved   very  

transmissible.  I  could  not  find  that  hydrogen  was  more  transmissible  than  air.  The  

fluorescence   was   visible   behind   plates   of   copper,   silver,   lead,   gold,   and   platinum,  

when  the  thickness  of  the  plate  was  not  too  great.  Platinum  0.2  millimeter  thick  is  

still   transmissible,   and   silver   and   copper   plates   may   be   still   thicker.   Lead   1.5  

millimeters  thick  is  practically  impenetrable,  and  advantage  was  frequently  taken  of  

this   characteristic.   A   wooden   stick   of   20   millimeters   square   cross   section,   having  

one  side  covered  with  white  lead,  behaved  differently  when  interposed  between  the  

vacuum  tube  and  the  screen  according  as  the  X-­‐rays  traversed  the  block  parallel  to  

the  painted  side  or  were  compelled  to  pass  through  it.  In  the  first  case  there  was  no  

effect   appreciable,   while   in   the   second   a   dark   shadow   was   thrown   on   the   screen.  

Salts  of  the  metals,  whether  solid  or  in  solution,  are  to  be  ranged  in  almost  the  same  

order  as  the  metals  themselves  for  transmissibility.  

3.   These   observations   and   others   lead   to   the   conclusion   that   the  

transmissibility   of   equal   thicknesses   of   different   substances   depends   on   their  

density.  At  least  no  other  characteristic  exerts  so  marked  an  influence  as  this.  

The   following   experiment   shows,   however,   that   the   density   is   not   the   sole  

factor.   I   compared   the   transmissibility   of   nearly   equally   thick   plates   of   glass,  

aluminum,   calcspar,

 8

 and   quartz.   The   density   of   these   substances   is   substantially  



the   same,   and   yet   it   was   quite   evident   that   the   calcspar   was   considerably   less  

transmissible  than  the  others,  which  are  about  alike  in  this  respect.  

                                                                                                               

7

 A  card  game.  



8

 Calcspar  is  a  mineral  and  polymorph  of  calcium  carbonate.  



 

3  


4.   All   bodies   became   less   transmissible   with   increasing   thickness.   For   the  

purpose   of   finding   a   relation   between   transmissibility   and   thickness   I   have   made  

photographic  exposures,  in  which  the  photographic  plate  was  partly  covered  with  a  

layer   of   tin   foil   consisting   of   a   progressively   increasing   number   of   sheets.   I   shall  

make   a   photometric   measurement   when   I   am   in   possession   of   a   suitable  

photometer.  

5.   Sheets   were   rolled   from   platinum,   lead,   zinc,   and   aluminum   of   such  

thickness  that  all  appeared  to  be  equally  transmissible.  The  following  table  gives  the  

measured  thickness  in  millimeters,  the  relative  thickness  compared  with  platinum,  

and  the  specific  gravity:  

 

Thickness              Relative              Specific  



                                             Thickness            Gravity  

 

Platinum  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  0.018                                        1                                  21.5  



Lead  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .    0.05                                            3                                  11.3  

Zinc  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .    0.20                                          6                                        7.1  

Aluminum  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .      3.5                                    200                                      2.6  

 

From   these   values   it   may   be   seen   that   the   transmissibility   of   plates   of  



different  metals  so  chosen  that  the  product  of  the  thickness  and  density  is  constant  

would   not   be   equal.   The   transmissibility   increases   much   faster   than   this   product  

falls  off.  

6.   The   fluorescence   of   barium-­‐platinum-­‐cyanide   is   not   the   only   action   by  

which   X-­‐rays   may   be   recognized.   It   should   be   remarked   that   they   cause   other  

substances   to   fluoresce,   as   for   example   the   photophorescent   calcium   compounds,  

uranium  glass,  common  glass,  calcspar,  rock  salt,  etc.  

It  is  of  particular  importance  from  many  points  of  view  that  photographic  dry  

plates  are  sensitive  to  X-­‐rays.  It  thus  becomes  possible  to  fix  many  phenomena  so  

that  deceptions  are  more  easily  avoided;  and  I  have  where  practicable  checked  all  

important  observations  made  with  a  fluorescent  screen  by  photographic  exposures.  

It  appears  questionable  whether  the  chemical  action  upon  the  silver  salts  of  

the   photographic   plate   is   produced   directly   by   the   X-­‐rays.   It   is   possible   that   this  

action   depends   upon   the   fluorescent   light   which,   as   is   mentioned   above,   may   be  

excited   in   the   glass   plate,   or   perhaps   in   the   gelatine   film.   “Films”   may   indeed   be  

made  use  of  as  well  as  glass  plates.  

I  have  not  as  yet  obtained  experimental  evidence  that  the  X-­‐rays  are  capable  

of  giving  heat.  This  characteristic  might,  however,  be  assumed  as  present,  since  in  

the  excitation  of  fluorescent  phenomena  the  capacity  of  the  energy  of  the  X-­‐rays  for  

transformation   is   proved,   and   since   it   is   certain   that   of   the   X-­‐rays   falling   upon   a  

body  not  all  are  given  up.  

The  retina  of  the  eye  is  not  sensitive  to  these  rays.  Nothing  is  to  be  noticed  by  

bringing   the   eye   near   the   vacuum   tube,   although   according   to   the   preceding  

observations  the  media  of  the  eye  must  be  sufficiently  transmissible  to  the  rays  in  

question.  

.  .  .  



 

4  


Taking   this   result   together   with   the   observation   that   powder   is   as  

transmissible   as   coherent   substance,   and   further,   that   bodies   with   rough   surfaces  

behave   in   the   transmission   of   X-­‐rays   and   also   in   the   experiments   just   described  

exactly   like   polished   bodies,   the   conclusion   is   reached   that   there   is,   as   before  

remarked,   no   regular   reflection,   but   that   the   bodies   behave   toward   X-­‐rays   in   the  

same  manner  as  a  turbid

9

 medium  with  reference  to  light.  



As   I   have   not   been   able   to   discover   any   refraction   in   the   passage   from   one  

medium  to  another,  it  appears  as  if  the  X-­‐rays  travel  with  equal  velocity  in  all  bodies,  

and  hence  in  a  medium  which  is  everywhere  present  and  in  which  the  particles  of  

the  bodies  are  embedded.  These  latter  act  as  a  hindrance  to  the  propagation  of  the  

X-­‐rays,  which  is  in  general  greater  the  greater  the  density  of  the  body  in  question.  

9.   In   accordance   with   this   supposition   it   might   be   possible   that   the  

arrangement   of   the   molecules   of   the   body   would   exert   an   influence   on   its  

transmissibility,   and   that,   for   example,   a   piece   of   calcspar   would   be   unequally  

transmissible  for  equal  thicknesses  when  the  rays  passed  along  or  at  right  angles  to  

the  axis.  Experiments  with  calcspar  and  quartz  gave,  however,  a  negative  result.  

10.   It   will   be   recalled   that   Lenard,   in   his   beautiful   experiments   on   the  

transmission   of   the   Hittorf   cathode   rays   through   thin   aluminum   foil,   obtained   the  

result  that  these  rays  are  disturbances  in  the  ether,  and  that  they  diffuse  themselves  

in  all  bodies.  We  may  make  a  similar  statement  with  regard  to  our  rays.  

.  .  .  

Most  other  substances  are,  like  the  air,  more  transmissible  for  X-­‐rays  than  for  

the  cathode  rays.  

.  .  .  

12.  According  to  the  results  of  experiments  particularly  directed  to  discover  

the  source  of  the  X-­‐rays,  it  is  certain  that  the  part  of  the  wall  of  the  discharge  tube  

which  most  strongly  fluoresces  is  the  principal  starting  point.  The  X-­‐rays  therefore  

radiate  from  the  place  where,  according  to  various  observers,  the  cathode  rays  meet  

the   glass   wall.   If   one   diverts   the   cathode   rays   within   the   tube   by   a   magnet,   the  

source  of  the  X-­‐ray  is  also  seen  to  change  its  position  so  that  these  radiations  still  

proceed   from   the   end   points   of   the   cathode   rays.   The   X-­‐rays   being   undeviated   by  

magnets   cannot,   however,   be   simply   cathode   rays   passing   unchanged   through   the  

glass   wall.   The   greater   density   of   the   gas   outside   of   the   discharge   tube   cannot,  

according  to  Lenard,  be  made  answerable  for  the  great  difference  of  the  deviation.  

I   come   therefore   to   the   results   that   the   X-­‐rays   are   not   identical   with   the  

cathode  rays,  but  that  they  are  excited  by  the  cathode  rays  in  the  glass  wall  of  the  

vacuum  tube.  

.  .  .  

17.  If  the  question  is  asked  what  the  X-­‐rays—which  certainly  are  not  cathode  

rays—really   are,   one   might   at   first,   on   account   of   their   lively   fluorescent   and  

chemical  action,  compare  them  to  ultra-­‐violet  light.  But  here  one  falls  upon  serious  

difficulties.   Thus,   if   the   X-­‐rays   were   ultra-­‐violet   light,   then   this   light   must   possess  

the  following  characteristics:  

(a)   That   in   passing   from   air   into   water,   carbon   bisulphide,   aluminum,   rock  

                                                                                                               

9

 Cloudy,  opaque.  



 

5  


salt,  glass,  zinc,  etc.,  it  experiences  no  notable  refraction.  

(b)  That  it  is  not  regularly  reflected  by  these  substances.  

(c)That  it  cannot  be  polarized  by  the  usual  materials.  

(d)  That  its  absorption  by  substances  is  influenced  by  nothing  so  much  as  by  

their  density.  

In  other  words,  one  must  assume  that  these  ultra-­‐violet  radiations  comport  

themselves  quite  differently  from  all  previously  known  infra-­‐red,  visible,  and  ultra-­‐

violet  rays.  

I  have  not  been  able  to  admit  this,  and  have  sought  some  other  explanations.  

A   kind   of   relation   seems   to   subsist   between   the   new   radiation   and   light  

radiation,   or   at   least   the   shadow   formation,   the   fluorescence,   and   the   chemical  

action,  which  are  common  phenomena  of  these  two  kinds  of  radiation,  point  in  this  

direction.  It  has  been  long  known  that  longitudinal  as  well  as  transverse  vibrations  

are  possible  in  the  ether,  and  according  to  various  physicists  must  exist.  To  be  sure,  

their   existence   has   not,   up   to   the   present   time,   been   proved,   and   hence   their  

characteristics  have  not  thus  far  been  experimentally  investigated.  

Should   not   the   new   radiations   be   ascribed   to   longitudinal   vibrations   in   the  

ether?   I   may   say   that   in   the   course   of   the   investigation   this   hypothesis   has  

impressed   itself   more   and   more   favorably   with   me,   and   I   venture   to   propose   it,  

although  well  aware  that  it  requires  much  further  examination.  



WÜRZBURG,  PHYSIK.  INSTITUT  D.  UNIV.,  December,  1895.  



Do'stlaringiz bilan baham:


Ma'lumotlar bazasi mualliflik huquqi bilan himoyalangan ©fayllar.org 2019
ma'muriyatiga murojaat qiling