Writing Egypt Content Final Writing Egypt 07. 07. 10 13: 39 Seite 1


Download 4 Mb.
Pdf просмотр
bet15/19
Sana15.12.2019
Hajmi4 Mb.
1   ...   11   12   13   14   15   16   17   18   19
Publisher’s Notes:
* Translation published as 
Khufu’s Wisdom (Cairo: The American University 
in Cairo Press, 2003).
**Translation published as 
Cairo Modern (Cairo: The American University in 
Cairo Press, 2008).
Notes
1 Gamal al-Ghitani, 
Najib Mahfuz yatadhakkar (Cairo: Akhbar al-Yawm, 1987), p. 9.
2 Ghali Shukri, 
al-Muntami: dirasa fi adab Najib Mahfuz (Cairo: Akhbar al-Yawm,
1964, 1969, 1982, 1988).
3 Ghali  Shukri, 
Najib  Mahfuz:  min  al-jammaliya  ila  nubil (Cairo:  al-Hay’a 
al-‘Amma li-l-Isti‘lamat, 1988), p. 103.
4 Louis Awad, 
Dirasat fi-l-adab wa-l-naqd (Cairo: Maktabat al-Anglu, 1964).
5 I am here including Naguib Mahfouz’s appointment as member of the editorial
staff of 
al-Ahram after his retirement in 1971. Mahfouz’s first governmental post
was in the administration of Fuad I University in 1934. His appointments from
then on were as follows: in 1939, he was appointed parliamentary secretary to the
Minister of Waqfs; in 1960 he became chair of the Cinema Institute; in 1962, he
was appointed art advisor to the Cinema Organization; in 1963, he headed the
Reading Committee of the General Cinema Organization; in 1965, he became a
member of the Supreme Council for Arts and Letters; in 1966, he was appointed
general supervisor of the General Cinema Organization; from 1968 to 1971 he
was chosen as consultant to the minister of culture, Tharwat Ukasha. Mahfouz
retired  in  November  1971  and  joined  the  editorial  staff  of 
al-Ahram  during 
December of the same year.
6 This information is part of an interview conducted with Dr. Adham Ragab in
Cairo’s weekly magazine 
Uktubar, 30 October 1988.
7 My interviews with Naguib Mahfouz at 
al-Ahram, 1989.
8 Ibid.
9 Mahmud Fawzi, 
Najib Mahfuz: za‘im al-harafish (Cairo: Dar al-Jil, 1988), p. 43.
10 My interview with Mahfouz at 
al-Ahram, 1989.
11 Ibid.
12 Ibid.
13 My interview with Fathi al-Ashri at 
al-Ahram, 1990. Al-Ashri is one of the 
literary critics at 
al-Ahram and was the first to volunteer some of his time to
help organize and supervise Mahfouz’s schedule since the Nobel prize. By
virtue of his position, al-Ashri has been in close contact with Mahfouz himself
and  has  been  exposed  to  most  of  the  issues  and  controversies  that  have 
surrounded Mahfous since the award.
R E S P E C T E D  S I R
287
Writing Egypt_Chapters_Final_Layout 1  07.07.10  09:58  Seite 287    (Schwarz Auszug)

KhairyShalaby
FistFight
from
The Lodging House
2006
288
I
never thought I could be brought down so low that I would accept 
living in Wikalat Atiya. Nor did I imagine that I would become such a
rotten bum that I would come to know a place in the city of Damanhour
called Wikalat Atiya. It was a place someone like me would not dream of
under any circumstances; my feet could not take me to such a far-off place,
which the sons of the city themselves might not even know, even those
who traveled through it from one end to the other, and who knew every
rat hole in it, had I not—as it became clear to me—broken the world’s
record for bumming and homelessness.
I am supposed to be a student at the Public Teachers’ Institute; I mean
that’s what I was over two years ago. I was on the verge of becoming a teacher
after a year, since my talent was obvious in pedagogical studies and in lesson
planning, including the modern methodologies, though I was plagued by a
math teacher who was despicable and disgusting and a bastard. He was not
happy that sons of detestable peasants from villages and hamlets, more like
barefoot riffraff than anything else, could excel in education over the true
sons of schools, originally from elite backgrounds and good, wealthy folks;
Writing Egypt_Chapters_Final_Layout 1  07.07.10  09:58  Seite 288    (Schwarz Auszug)

F I S T  F I G H T
289
and so he would screw with me in every exam, provoking me with dirty looks,
writing me up every time I sat up in my seat or coughed or turned around to
ask one of my classmates for a ruler or compass or an eraser, things that I
don’t think ever bought once throughout all my school days. This pissed him
off, and it made him even more bitter that I never bought a book he required
or a quad-lined notebook which, he urged, was necessary. So the son of a
bitch saw fit to prevent anyone from helping me one bit; he even kicked out
a classmate who snuck me a compass. When he cussed me out, I began to
aim looks of suppressed hatred at him, such that I enraged him terribly, and
he took away my blank answer sheet, and then, like the swaggering, pompous
ass he was, kicked me out. I froze as if nailed in place, shaking with fury; my
eyes must have been like flaming arrows, since he bared his teeth and said,
“Why are you looking at me like that, boy?”
Still I persisted in my gaze, I don’t know why or what I could have done.
He kicked me, his kicks forcing me toward the classroom door, and I was
down flat on my face, I who had not so long ago fancied myself a venerable,
respectable teacher. I lost it but quickly pulled myself back together. Like a
wild, rabid dog I threw myself at the gut of Wael Effendi the math teacher
with all my might. I snapped at the flesh of his face with my teeth, and I
bashed in his nose and teeth with my forehead, I kneed him in the groin and
stomped on his shins, until he fell down to the ground, and I kneeled over
him holding this collar and burying my fingers in the flesh of his neck. The
whole exam hall sprang to life. I felt like an entire city was raining blows on
my body, trying in vain to extract him from me. The clamor grew and cheating
flared up and tons of crib notes and cheat sheets began piling up, and the
dean came running in a panic, and more than one policeman came, and the
billy club slammed down on my back, my rear end, and my head. But every
blow I received, I returned to Wael Effendi by raising his head then smashing
it on the ground as if I wanted to shake out his brain. Then when it appeared
to me that he’d given up the ghost and all his limbs had collapsed and he
turned yellow and the light in his eyes had gone out completely, I went limp,
and I responded to the hands that lifted me from him. When I stood up I
started stomping on his stomach, on his groin, on his face, until I felt him in
a shredded heap, stained with blood, my blood and his.
Writing Egypt_Chapters_Final_Layout 1  07.07.10  09:58  Seite 289    (Schwarz Auszug)

They took him to the hospital in critical condition; they handed me over
to the city police in pitiful condition, accompanied by the dean’s curses and
his description of my family and all my kind as despicable hooligans, and he
cursed Taha Hussein as the one who destroyed education and polluted it
with lowlifes like me. I knew that he would say this, but I didn’t give a damn;
for I was certain that I had quenched my thirst for revenge and avenged my
wounded pride, and many of my classmates were looking at me with a great
deal of sorrow tinged with something like admiration; and besides, I felt that
I hadn’t finished the piss that I must yet piss in Wael Effendi’s mouth, but I
would still go to jail and my future would be ruined at his hands, and that I
would undoubtedly kill him the moment I was free again.
The court took pity on me, giving me a six-month suspended sentence
and expelling me from the Institute. A year after that I went to school one
day, on the pretext of getting my transcripts, intending to stick a knife in the
heart of Wael Effendi, and I was surprised to find that he had been disfigured
by the loss of an eye where apparently, in my madness, I had gouged it out,
and the marks my teeth had dug in all over his face were still there, and he
walked to class a broken man, having given up his arrogance and swagger and
lowered his perpetually bellowing voice with his lisping, fancy tongue. As
for the distinctive elegance of his dress, it had faded completely. I noticed my
grip on the knife handle loosening in my pocket and I was overcome with a
kind of pity for the both of us. He had seen me out of the corner of his good
eye but he didn’t recognized me since my appearance had changed drastically,
for my hair had grown long and was visibly messed up and my beard had
grown, and my clothes were wrinkled and dirt had accumulated on my face
and my hands and my clothes, so much so that most of my classmates did
not recognize me as they passed by me in the schoolyard or the secretary’s
office. Actually I liked that, as I hadn’t wanted them to remember me, and I
only wanted to get my papers and put them in the pocket of my gallabiya to
use as identity papers when necessary.
That incident meant that I would never return to my village at all, and
that I would make the city streets my home. I spent all day and all night 
wandering the streets and alleys and neighborhoods, from Susi Street to
Mudiriya Street to Iflaqa Bridge to Shubra to Abu al-Rish to Nadi Street. I
290
K H A I RY  S H A L A B Y
Writing Egypt_Chapters_Final_Layout 1  07.07.10  09:58  Seite 290    (Schwarz Auszug)

spent some time at the public library reading stories and novels and poetry,
looking for a better world to shelter me for a few hours, after which I turned
back to the asphalt streets of Damanhour, stingy by their very nature, dry in
character, and inhospitable to strangers. I cut across Susi Street from al-Sagha
Street after I had smelled enough of the ful midammis wafting upward from
al-Asi’s restaurant, the most famous ful-maker in all of Egypt, for they say that
he presented King Farouk with a pot of his ful, and when the king had a dish
of it for breakfast, he gave him the rank of bey via urgent cable, the title by which
he was now called by the dozens, no, hundreds of visitors who came to his
restaurant every day, from all over the country, for a dish of this famous ful.
When I turned off Susi Street and onto Suq Street, I was greeted by the
fruits of Fakharani in a complete garden of awesome and appetizing scents,
so it pleased me to plunge into the bazaar, to mix in my nose the smells of
apples, dates, guava, and lemon with the smells of fish and meats and gargir
and dung from the horses drawing wagons. The crowded street, paved with
broad, flat stones and crisscrossed with little canyons of dirty water, spat me
out onto the main street which was the height of cleanliness, running from
the railroad station to Iflaqa Bridge on Mahmudiya Canal. By that time the
smell of frying ta‘miya had intoxicated me and I was convinced that I had
eaten my fill, even though my insides were completely empty. When the dark
night came all sensations gave way to stifling cold or fear or loss. I knew sleep
inside the drain pipes and under the trees on the rural thoroughfares and
near  the  twenty-four-hour  bakeries  and  on  the  sidewalks  close  to  the 
low-class coffee shops, yet I hadn’t fallen so low as to know the place called
Wikalat Atiya.
Translated by Farouk Abdel Wahab
291
F I S T  F I G H T
Writing Egypt_Chapters_Final_Layout 1  07.07.10  09:58  Seite 291    (Schwarz Auszug)

FerialJ.Ghazoul
NomadicText
from
Nocturnal Poetics
1996
292
T
he Arabian Nights has moved with ease and confidence from one
cultural context to another, and has managed to transplant itself into
different epochs. In his study of the influence to 
The Arabian Nights
on European and American literatures, Robert lrwin suggests humorously—
but correctly—in a chapter entitled 
“Children of the Nights” that “it might
have been an easier, shorter chapter if [he] had discussed those writers who
were not influenced by the 
Nights.”
1
So pervasive has been the presence of
The Arabian Nights in Western imagination over the last three centuries that
it is difficult to find writers who have escaped its fascination and abstained
from alluding to it. This includes such writers and literati as Voltaire and
Proust, Wordsworth and Joyce, Poe and Whitman.
2
How can one work be
shared and internalized by so many writers who belong to different and often
hostile schools and orientations?
Even more striking are the critical debates which have used 
The Arabian
Nights as a text of reference—if not a battleground—to further their position.
3
This marvelous work also seems to cut across epochs and cultures: ancient
Indians, medieval Persians and Arabs, Europeans during the Renaissance and
Writing Egypt_Chapters_Final_Layout 1  07.07.10  09:58  Seite 292    (Schwarz Auszug)

N O M A D I C T E X T
293
the Age of Enlightenment, as people of the New World—both in its southern
and northern hemispheres—have dwelt on this work. It is indeed a text for
all times and places. How does this text manage to travel so well and not
wither in alien climates and distant regions?
It is remarkable that a text which is neither sacred nor canonical can
overpower  and  interpenetrate  so  many  cultural  and  literary  systems. 
No doubt, the very fact of its fluidity and tolerance for textual mutations and
variations has strengthened its ability to migrate. Added to this, its segmentary
character based on autonomous narrative blocks and detachable enframed and
framing stories, make it easier to de-link the parts and recycle the narratives,
or specific blocks in them, for an infinite number of new ends. There is no
need to bind oneself to the whole chain, since one can choose the stories one
fancies without having to deal with the rest. There is thus a double flexibility
in the text of 
The Arabian Nights: stylistically, it offers an unfixed discourse
and structurally it offers loose (but by no means absent) links of articulation.
It can, in other words, be easily deconstructed and reconstructed, rendering
itself an example of a recyclable artifact.
The variety of themes and motifs in 
The Arabian Nights offers essentially
an encyclopedia of narrative tales and genres. This allows for the coexistence
of a variety of narratives: short and long, elaborate and simple, fables and
epics, sacred and pornographic, childish and philosophical. 
The Arabian Nights
also  combines  many  narrative  techniques—from  boxing  and  embedding, 
perspectivism and self-reflexivity, juxtaposition of poetry and prose, tragic
and comic plotting—thus allowing any sensibility to find an echo in one or
more of the heterogeneous samples. The unity of the whole is at a deep level,
permitting diversity on the surface level.
It is, then, the richness and variety of the text with the possibilities of 
excision and refashioning inherent in it that explains its continuous appeal
and influence. But that is not all, for collections of stories abound and none
really occupy the privileged position of 
The Arabian Nights in the world’s
imagination. The reason for this, I believe, lies in the nature of the frame story
which justifies the telling and transforms the framework from a contrived
gadget or a narrative machine to an engendering matrix. The frame story
joins narration and creativity with their raison d’être; it turns narration itself
Writing Egypt_Chapters_Final_Layout 1  07.07.10  09:58  Seite 293    (Schwarz Auszug)

upon itself. It is a self-reflexive text, and in that sense it appeals not only to
those who enjoy a good narrative, but also to those who like to understand
the phenomenon of narration. Unlike other collections that may have moral,
religious, or social ends, 
The Arabian Nights’ end is contemplating its own
activity. It is somewhat like an 
ars poetica, a poem about writing poetry, 
or a play about the performing of a play. Such works will always capture the
interest of those who wonder about the literary process itself, the nature 
of art and fiction, and indeed the identities and inversions of human activity
in its myriad forms.
The thematic thrust of the frame story, which offers a myth of myths, is
based on deploying fundamental drives or instincts—those of life and death,
of integration and disintegration—about which not enough can ever be said.
The text seems to perceive that it is embarking on a never-ending path, and
thus projects an infinite discourse—a narration that goes on and on. This 
ongoing narrative impulse has proved to be contagious: not only do its readers
want to reread it, but they also want to rewrite it. It has, if one may borrow
from Eco his term 
opera aperta, “open structure.” It is not only a work that 
offers a hope, it is also a work that invites participation in the form of rewriting,
recompiling, or reinterpreting. The ending is not a real closure, but more of
bringing down of a curtain on a stage to stop the performance for the night,
while promising more performances and sequels.
The nomadic character of 
The Arabian Nights stems from an intersection
of several factors: (1) the variety of the enframed genres with an overall framing
unity and a matricial base; (2) the work revolves around elemental forces in
human existence and thus speaks to everyone, everywhere; (3) the work 
addresses itself to the problematic of its very being—narration—constituting
what amounts to the creation of a myth of the origin of verbal creativity and
its healing powers; and (4) the unlimited options afforded by the stylistic
fluidity and structural flexibility of the work.
But above and beyond these factors, what makes 
The Arabian Nights
such a widely and diversely interesting next is its “otherness.” Its beauty 
is unconventional; it is darkly beautiful, for it articulates the beauty of 
what is suppressed and oppressed. It uncovers unspeakable desires and 
marginalized types. Women, salves, and the riffraff are central. It is not only
294
F E R I A L  J .  G H A Z O U L
Writing Egypt_Chapters_Final_Layout 1  07.07.10  09:58  Seite 294    (Schwarz Auszug)

that Shahrazad narrates her stories at night that makes the poetics of the
work nocturnal—it is also because she adopts a nocturnal rhetoric and a
Dionysian poetics. All the chaotic, anarchic, and subaltern drives constitute
the “otherness” that is aired freely in the text. Inasmuch as civilizations
everywhere  are  based on  repression,  the  need  to  acknowledge  what  is 
repressed is essential and a relief. When reading 
The Arabian Nights, we feel
that we are getting even with canonical values and their tyranny. Even though
The Arabian Nights constitutes no longer a taboo, it remains for the West,
and possibly for the world at large, an alien cultural product with an-other
poetics. In Arab culture, it is identified with the rabble and can never aspire
to canonization, no matter how influential it has become with the literary
elite. At the deepest level, it is precisely this “otherness”—aesthetic and 
cultural—that  makes  the  work  so  continuously  appealing.  A  text  that
evokes the distanced and the buried makes one feel a sense of restoration
in internalizing it.
Many cultures, needless to say, have contributed to 
The Arabian Nights
as we know it, but it remains associated with the Arabs who have preserved
it. Is there something in early Arab aesthetics and culture that touched a 
certain chord when first listening to the narratives of 
The Arabian Nights? 
It is difficult to answer such questions, but we can speculate as to why the
Arabs held on to this work despite the fact that it went against the grain—
at least against the canons of the literary establishment.
I would venture to explain the persistence and growth of this collection
of tales in Arab culture as a result of the fact that it complements and dovetails
with the 
qasida, the classical Arab ode. Both types are made to move easily
in  a  nomadic  life  style.  The  Bedouins  in  their  moves  from  one  place  to 
another had developed art forms that suited their nomadism and migrations.
Dramatic  performances  need  a  fixed  stage  and  an  elaborate  theatrical 
institution, which nomads could not afford given their way of life. This does
not mean that there was no drama, but it means that dramatic art was probably
subsumed in ritual drama and holy sacrifice. Narrative and poetry, on the other
hand, need one 
rawi to recite the text, and this recitor needs an exceptional
memory  in  order  to  narrate  and  declaim.  Even  though  writing  was 
well-known in pre-Islamic Arabia, the Bedouin life style, ever on the move,
295
N O M A D I C T E X T
Writing Egypt_Chapters_Final_Layout 1  07.07.10  09:58  Seite 295    (Schwarz Auszug)

F E R I A L  J .  G H A Z O U L
296
imposed an economy of tools and reduced what was to be carried around
to  the  minimum.  Mnemonic  aids  were  a  necessity  in  this  cultural 
ambiance, and Arabic poetry developed its own structural and rhythmic
devices  that  would  ensure  the  memorization  of  a  text.  Monorhyme
prosody and limited meters helped pack up Arabic lyricism from one place
to another, in specifically defined verbal containers, so to speak. A parallel
device  that  helped  preserve  prose  narratives  used  an  opposite,  albeit 
complementary,  strategy.  It  made  use  of  expandable  containers  that 
functioned like verbal accordions. In 
The Arabian Nights, the complex 
narrative structure allows for the maximum capacities of enfolding, while
permitting and even encouraging stylistic liberty and license. In the 
qasida
the complex poetic meters control the stream of words and subordinate
them to the straightjackets of prosody. Both strategies tap and channel 
verbal creativity, but in classical Arabic poetry the formulation affects 
the very order of signifiers, while the unacanonical formulation of 
The 
Arabian Nights affects the order of signifieds. Textual nomadism is the 
result of an entrenched oral culture and the lack of affixing institutions.
Although the Arabs had their oasis towns in Arabia before Islam where
writing was known and used, a culture of writing was not yet in evidence—
with all that it implies in changes of thought and knowledge. After the 
advent of Islam and the rise of powerful and settled caliphates in Syria,
Iraq, Spain, etc., one would not expect a poetics built on orality to persist,
yet it did—alongside a culture based on the book and 
écriture. The poetics
of  the  nomads  exemplified  in  the 
qasida  remained  overpowering, 
even  though  a  more  written  poetics  was  developing  in  what  came  to 
be  called 
adab,  with  its  new  prose  rhythms  and  elaborate  sentence 
structures. With writing, texts developed in the medieval Arab world that
covered philosophical treatises and refined narratives, while some works—
like 
The Arabian Nights—though written down by narrators, were never
part  of  the  literary  canon  and  thus  continued  to  carry  the  imprint  of 
free oral diversifications. But unlike the oral poetics of the 
qasida, The Ara-
bian Nights was neither glorified nor recognized as literature. If the poetics
of the 
qasida represented the Apollonian streak—the poetics of broad 
daylight—that of 
The Arabian Nights represented the Dionysian streak, 
Writing Egypt_Chapters_Final_Layout 1  07.07.10  09:58  Seite 296    (Schwarz Auszug)
1   ...   11   12   13   14   15   16   17   18   19


Ma'lumotlar bazasi mualliflik huquqi bilan himoyalangan ©fayllar.org 2019
ma'muriyatiga murojaat qiling