Writing Egypt Content Final Writing Egypt 07. 07. 10 13: 39 Seite 1


Download 4 Mb.
Pdf просмотр
bet17/19
Sana15.12.2019
Hajmi4 Mb.
1   ...   11   12   13   14   15   16   17   18   19
Translated by Nancy Roberts
311
C I T Y  O F T H E  P R O P H E T S
Writing Egypt_Chapters_Final_Layout 1  07.07.10  09:58  Seite 311    (Schwarz Auszug)

312
I
t was past three o’clock in the morning when the vehicle came to halt
in front of the farmhouse gate, raising a din that roused the dogs out of
their silence. The moon was whispering to the earth with a soft light
that reflected off the river, turning its surface into fractured silver mirrors that
moved to the rhythm of the breeze as it strummed its tunes on the tresses of
the lofty willows. The wolf howled, calling out to the legendary rabbit that
had  stolen  into  the  sky’s  luminous  ball.  Since  its  howling  came  from  a 
distance, it caused no worry to travelers, who knew that its territory came to
an end at the borders of the outlying fields. In fact, some of them were familiar
with its den next to the old tumbledown bridge.
The car’s engine turned off and silence reigned powerfully once again,
making way for the croaking of wakeful frogs singing their ode to romantic
love and a dog pleased with its own bark, their voices permeating the stillness.
Rushdi  Musaylihi  got  out  of  the  car,  taking  care  not  to  let  his 
cast-enveloped arm touch the car door. With an athletic physique that he
took pleasure in maintaining, he had a kind-looking, round face with a
ruddy complexion that bore signs of exhaustion from the long journey. 
HalaElBadry
TheBedSheet
from
Muntaha
2006
Writing Egypt_Chapters_Final_Layout 1  07.07.10  09:58  Seite 312    (Schwarz Auszug)

T H E  B E D  S H E E T
313
His  face  had  an  Egyptian  twinkle  to  it  despite  his  mixed  features,  the 
blueness of his eyes, his black hair, and the bushy eyebrows that lent him a
harsh appearance, which only disappeared when he smiled broadly and
laughter graced his thin lips.
His steps, confident and relaxed despite the feebleness in his wounded
legs, rustled through the blue gum tree leaves that had fallen beneath the bay
windows with their wooden latticework. He stood outside Taha’s bedroom
window and coughed three times, the air piercing his weary chest.
“Abu Abdallah!” he called out.
The slumbering Taha stirred.
“Abu Abdallah!” Rushdi called out again.
Taha saw a wide road and a friend waving to him in the distance and 
calling his name. He ran toward him, spreading his arms to receive him. Then
he  began  to  rouse  to  the  sound  of  someone’s  voice,  which  suddenly 
constricted the untrammeled, open space of his dream world. He opened his
eyes, which came up against the ceiling with its walnut beams, and realized
that he’d been asleep. He heard a voice coming from outside and knew it 
wasn’t a figment of his dreams.
Despite  the  heaviness  of  his  body,  he  jumped  up  without  realizing 
who was calling.
“Yes! I’ll be right there!”
As he opened the window to see who was calling, Wadida got out of bed
and lit the kerosene lamp. Hearing a commotion among the sentries in front
of the arms depot, she brought the large lantern while the mayor welcomed
his brother, who had returned from the Palestine war during the truce.
“Welcome! Welcome! Thank God you’re back safely! I’ll be right down!”
said Taha.
A gentle stir made its way through the rooms overlooking the street and
the river. Taha rushed to open the apartment door, leaning his body forward.
Then, adjusting his feet inside the yellow leather slippers which he hadn’t yet
managed to get all the way on, he crossed the upstairs landing that overlooked
the  house’s  inner  courtyard  and  served  as  a  corridor  onto  which  all  the 
extended family’s living quarters opened. Burly and tall with a broad chest,
powerful  forearms  and  venous  hands,  the  sun  had  been  his  companion 
Writing Egypt_Chapters_Final_Layout 1  07.07.10  09:58  Seite 313    (Schwarz Auszug)

all-year round in the wide-open spaces, causing his forehead and nose to take
on a bronze-like sheen. He had piercing black eyes that he would beam into
the  pupils  of  the  person  he  was  speaking  to,  who  would  invariably  get 
flustered without having committed any offense. He had a sharp nose and a
broad mouth guarded by lips with a bluish tint, and luxuriant black hair that
was hidden constantly beneath a white turban. So ingrained was the habit of
covering his head, he didn’t forget to put on his skullcap despite having been
awakened so early and unexpectedly, and his drowsiness fled before the 
onslaught of his sudden burst of activity. Before reaching the door that led
to the stairs, he heard an unusual commotion. Looking up as he secured his
turban, he was accosted suddenly by a tall, thin specter. Stark naked, it looked
in the moonlight like a shadow leaping up the marble stairs toward the third
floor. After being thrown off balance ever so briefly, Taha ran after the ghost,
then raised the lamp higher in order to make out his features. He nearly took a
spill on the landing as he dodged two young servant girls who’d been sleeping
in the open air, and who were roused by the sudden commotion without 
realizing what was happening around them. Then he noticed a third girl
curled up in the corner. She was clinging to a robe with which she tried to
conceal her body. The flame grew brighter, revealing the fugitive’s face as the
stairs disappeared one after another beneath the pounding of his feet.
“Stop, you dog. Where do you think you’re going? Even if you reach the
sky, I’ll catch up with you. In my house, you bastard? In my household? 
I swear to God, even Azrael won’t be able to rescue you once I’ve got hold 
of you!”
The flights of stairs that had separated the two men vanished gradually
until Bashir, the household’s coffee server, reached the door to the roof
and  hesitated.  After  turning  to  face  the  mayor  and  realizing  he  was 
cornered,  he  took  a  few  tremulous  steps  backward.  His  white  teeth
gleamed in the surrounding darkness, and in his eyes there glimmered two
stars with a defiance that filled his pursuer with the kind of revulsion 
that  leads  one  to  kill,  not  as  a  celebration  of  life—as  when  a  hunter 
rejoices in his quarry—but out of contempt. A bat fluttered out in front
of them, roused by the scent of blood soon to be shed. As Bashir stepped
back, his elbow pushed open the tower door that suddenly loomed behind 
314
H A L A  E L  BA D RY
Writing Egypt_Chapters_Final_Layout 1  07.07.10  09:58  Seite 314    (Schwarz Auszug)

him, and he went in. His pursuer approached the door and bolted the 
latch securely.
Panting, he said, “You wait for me here. As soon as I finish receiving the
guests, I’ll be back to settle accounts with you.”
With sweat trickling down his face, Taha flew down the stairs in a fury,
forcing the servants who had been sleeping on the steps and their naked 
companion to get hurriedly out his way. In the stairwell he saw dancing of
shadows, which would appear whenever the lamps glowed more brightly,
then disappear again. He recognized them as the women of his household.
They stood back to let him pass, none of them daring to utter a word to him.
He shot ahead like a rock that’s been released from a slingshot and is
headed  for  its  target,  his  body  snapping  with  a  stifled  explosion.  The 
commotion roused everyone who had been shrouded in slumber’s mist,
and the household awakened one room after another. Small lights were 
apprehensively lit, and everyone in the extended household appeared in the
darkened courtyard—which resisted the light that was breaking in from its
various  sides—blanketed  in  sleep  like  pilgrims  circumambulating  the
Kaaba in anticipation of the divine blessing. Audible kisses were planted
intermittently  on  welcoming  hands,  then  on  cheeks,  followed  by  warm 
embraces. People’s questions about Rushdi’s wound, which rose in a steady
crescendo, put a damper on the joy occasioned by having him home alive,
while other questions were being asked about the war, the truce, and the
number of wounded. They were shocked by how thin Naziha, Rushdi’s wife,
had become.
Wadida said to her, “If he’d known that his going away would eat you up
like this, he wouldn’t have left.”
Laughing, Naziha said to her sister-in-law, “Men go off to war, and they
don’t give a hoot if we die of worry!”
As conversation heated up about the trip back to Egypt, those present
temporarily forgot about the night’s other ‘surprise.’ Umm Hilmi stole away
from the family and headed up to the roof. No one noticed her disappearance
except Wadida, who came after her, sensing that she was up to something.
“Where are you going?” she asked, grasping her shoulder from behind as
she started up the stairs.
315
T H E  B E D  S H E E T
Writing Egypt_Chapters_Final_Layout 1  07.07.10  09:58  Seite 315    (Schwarz Auszug)

“Get out of my way, Wadida, and ask people if they need some supper!”
“Ni‘ma . . . you wouldn’t dare! Your brother would kill us! Do you want
to create a disaster on top of the one we’ve already got on our hands?”
“A disaster is what will happen if we leave him on the roof. Taha will kill
him and be lost over nothing. Are we going to let him murder this cockroach?”
Not  waiting  for  Wadida  to  reply,  Ni‘ma  continued,  “Besides,  what 
business is it of ours what happens to the servant girl? It’s her family’s 
problem. They can slaughter her or marry her off, but that’s their concern.
However, the mayor won’t let the matter pass!”
“Come back, Ni‘ma. Your brother will never forgive you for this. After all,
this man has violated the sanctity of his household.”
“Prudence is in order, my dear. Keep out of it, and I’ll take responsibility
for whatever happens.”
Ni’ma continued on her way up, her shoes clicking beneath the weight
of her plump, rounded hips. A tall woman, she had inherited her fair com-
plexion and sharp features from her mother, who was of Circassian origin,
and her dark, wide eyes from her father. She wore her long hair in braids, to
which she added strands of pure gold whenever she left the house.
Wadida  withdrew,  muttering  angrily.  Unconvinced  of  the  wisdom 
of what her husband’s sister was about to do, she asked God to grant His
protection. On her way down, she was accosted by a pair of panic-stricken
eyes glimmering in the dark.
Collapsing onto the floor, Rawayih implored, “I kiss your feet, ma’am.
Protect me! Protect me! And may God protect you in this life and the next!”
Then she burst into frenzied tears that rained down onto her hands as
they clung to her mistress’s feet. Pained, Wadida tried mightily to free her-
self from Rawayih’s grip without knowing what to do.
“Get up,” she said, “and hide in the grain storage room. Tomorrow’s
another day. If you went home now, the whole village would know about
the scandal.”
The girl rose halfway, sobbing and wiping her nose with the back of
her hand.
“He’s the one who comes to me, I swear to God. I was afraid to tell you.
Sometimes he would threaten me, and other times he’d promise to marry me.”
316
H A L A  E L  BA D RY
Writing Egypt_Chapters_Final_Layout 1  07.07.10  09:58  Seite 316    (Schwarz Auszug)

They heard Ni‘ma coming down the stairs on tiptoe. In a stern whisper
she said, “Shut up, you tramp! Doesn’t your honor mean anything to you?
You’ve buried your father’s head in the mud. Come on now, up with you.
Sleep in the grain storage room.”
“What did you do?” Wadida asked her warily.
Not taking her eyes off Rawayih until she was out of sight, Ni‘ma replied,
“I opened the latch for him and let him go his way!”
The two women went together into the large sitting room in Umm Taha’s
apartment where the family was gathered, young and old, around Rushdi
and Naziha.
Seeing her mother-in-law holding back her tears, Wadida said, “What’s
this, Mama? He’s back home safely. What more could we ask?”
“I’ve placed my trust in God,” replied Adila.
Taha’s daughter Kawthar got up to serve lemonade to the members of the
family, who sat and listened to Rushdi until dawn of the following day.
In the morning, after life had stirred anew throughout the five feddans
on which the farmhouse stood, they found out how Bashir had slipped into
the ladies’ apartments, since the rope that he had used was still hanging in
place, tied to a hollow crescent moon over the middle wooden door.
When Taha sent one of the sentries to bring Bashir and he came back
empty-handed, he said, “So, then! I swear I’ll bring him in, even if he’s hiding
under his mother’s breast! As for the one who let him go, his punishment is
postponed for now!”
Successive reports had circulated in the village to the effect that Radi the
fisherman, his wife Hamida and their son, Ma’mun, had woken in a fright to
the sound of something being knocked down on top of their roof, and that
it had shaken the walls of their house. They bought it would go through the
roof beams, which groaned and nearly gave way. Before they discovered what
was behind it, they saw a phantom leaping into the street and running away
without a stitch of clothing on. The peasant women, who had gathered to
fill the water jars at the time of the dawn prayer, added that they’d investigated
the matter and that there would have been no way for a man to jump out of
the farmhouse tower, and from such a high elevation, since Radi’s house,
which had been built in part of the area occupied by the cattle pen, faced the
317
T H E  B E D  S H E E T
Writing Egypt_Chapters_Final_Layout 1  07.07.10  09:58  Seite 317    (Schwarz Auszug)

318
farmhouse’s high wall on two sides. And as for its eastern side and the side
that faces the qibla, they faced onto the street corner. In any case, Bashir never
showed his face in the neighborhood again.
One ill-fated day before noon, Qanu‘, the village midwife, personally 
examined Rawayih in the presence of her mother and Umm Taha, and found
an  unborn  child  in  her  womb  in  the  beginning  of  its  fifth  month.  She 
informed the village matriarch that an abortion would be dangerous, and
that it could end the girl’s life.
Then she added, “It’s up to you. Consult among yourselves, and I’ll do
whatever I’m told!”
She left them to think it over, but before she’d gotten as far as the gate,
the mayor’s mother had decided that the servant girl would have to go, and
that the decision would have to be made by her parents. Despite her explicit
instructions that no one was to breathe a word about the matter, the news
quickly got out to the people of Muntaha. After all, it was highly unusual
for a servant girl to leave her job at the farmhouse before she married, or
even  after  she  married  for  that  matter,  given  the  difficulty  of  finding 
employment elsewhere.
Some  of  the  village  women  said  they’d  seen  Rawayih  washing  out
blood-stained clothing, and that her mother had beaten out an entire robe
saturated with the remains of her abortion on a rock at the river’s edge. 
Despite her valiant efforts to conceal it among her black garments and
clothes that belonged to her brothers and sisters, what she’d done wasn’t
lost on the women who had experience in such matters, and none of them
offered her any help. When the girl greeted them as she passed by with a
tub of wrung-out laundry on her head, her face yellow as a lemon, none
of them could bring herself to reply to her.
Pursing her lips, Umm Mahmud said in a long, drawn-out voice that was
audible to everyone, “We’ve lived and seen. Folks with sha-a-a-me are a 
dy-ii-ii-ng-g bre-e-e-ed!!”
After turning the girl over on her back, Qanu‘ inserted a dry date stalk
into  her  cervix.  W hen  she  screamed  in  pain  and  her  wine-colored 
complexion—which, on the day before the scandal broke, had been 
the color of a ripe plum—turned blue, the midwife said sarcastically,
318
H A L A  E L  BA D RY
Writing Egypt_Chapters_Final_Layout 1  07.07.10  09:58  Seite 318    (Schwarz Auszug)

T H E  B E D  S H E E T
319
“Some  right  you’ve  got  to  scream!  Shush,  or  I’ll  make  this  the  end 
of you!”
Rawayih wept silently while her mother looked at the floor, wiping her
daughter’s tears furtively with the edge of her black mesh veil. Qanu‘ had 
prepared a mixture of herbs which she introduced into the girl’s vagina by
means of a clean oil funnel before interesting the rough stick. Then she had
her drink an emulsion of boiled cinnamon and pomegranate and take laxative
pills. The girl began writhing in pain, clutching her abdomen. But before 
another moan could come out, the old woman stuffed the hem of her dress
into the girl’s mouth, saying, “Bite on this, or bite the ground. So you’re hurtin’
now, are you? It was nice at the time, although, wasn’t it, smarty pants?”
She left the room carrying a rag in which there struggled a black fetus
that expired a few minutes later.
“Be strong, Abu Shu‘ayshi‘!” she said. “There’s no end to the trouble in
this world, brother.”
Weeping, the man said, “It’s God’s will.”
She  patted  him  on  the  shoulder,  saying,  “Pray  for  blessings  on  the
Prophet. Pray for blessings on the Prophet. And ask God for guidance. For
every problem, there’s a Lord to solve it. Cast your burden on your Maker!”
In a remote corner of the cattle pen wall, everyone who entered noticed
some soft new clay that had been pounded and was still damp. Dark-colored,
with golden straws glistening on its surface, the days of misery hadn’t altered
it yet. And when Abu Shu‘ayshi‘ came into the farmhouse carrying a sack of
wheat on his stooped back to store it in the upstairs granary, he happened to
catch Umm Taha’s eye.
After getting out the bottle of carbolic acid, she came up to him and said,
“Buck up. Take one cup of this and your troubles will be over!”
The man hung his head and, without looking up or putting the bag down,
he said, “One’s offspring are precious, ma’am. She’s my daughter, and this is
no small matter.”
He sighed repeatedly and, without his being able to wipe them off, the
tears streamed down his cheeks, filling the canals and crevices that the years
had etched into his face.
“It’s no small matter,” he repeated.
Writing Egypt_Chapters_Final_Layout 1  07.07.10  09:58  Seite 319    (Schwarz Auszug)

Squeezing her cane with an agitation that caused the Turkish-Circassian
veins to bulge out of her aging neck, the woman’s face turned the color of
blood-red wine.
Then,  squinting  her  already  narrow  blue  eyes,  she  accentuated  the
sharpness of her features with a shriek.
“Where’s your courage, man! This is your honor!”
He swallowed the words, the heavy load flaying his back like a whip in
the scorching heat.
“One’s offspring are precious,” he said, then went his way muttering,
“There’s no power or strength but in God!”
A week later, the sound of joyous ululations could be heard, and Sheikh
Eissa’s wife, the seamstress, spent the night making bridal attire out of
white, rose-colored, and off-white satin. She sent the groom to the chief
town  in  the  province  to  buy  a  black  velvet  dress  for  Rawayih  to  wear 
on special occasions for the rest of her life, just like all the other women 
in  the  village.  Meanwhile,  a  tray  filled  with  henna—which  blankets 
the  ground  in  Paradise—and  piled  high  with  small  pieces  of  paper
folded  into  cone  shapes,  was  taken  around  to  all  the  houses  in  the 
village to invite people to the wedding. As they received the invitation,
mothers would say to the invitation bearer, “I’d be delighted to come, dear.
Of course we’ll be there. A thousand congratulations, and we wish the same
for all your beloved children!”
As late afternoon approached, Abu Shu‘ayshi‘ sat holding the hand 
of Farag, his brother’s son, waiting for the ma’zun to draw up the marriage 
contract. Before coming into the house, every woman in attendance had
her  mouth  to  her  neighbor’s  ear,  swearing  she  knew  the  details  of  the 
scandal. However, not a woman in the entire village was absent that day.
They came laden with paper cones filled with sugar, bottles of fruit syrup,
baskets of rice, and bags of flour. In fact, one of them was so bold as to
slaughter for the bride a male duck that she’d fattened specially for the 27
th
of  Ragab  season.  The  women  sat  on  a  large  mat  in  the  house’s  inner 
courtyard while the men occupied the street, sitting on benches and sofas
which they’d collected from neighboring houses and sipping a red infusion
made from roses and strawberries that Umm Shu‘ayshi‘ kept pouring into
320
H A L A  E L  BA D RY
Writing Egypt_Chapters_Final_Layout 1  07.07.10  09:58  Seite 320    (Schwarz Auszug)

glasses and handing to her girls to pass around until she was sure everyone
had been served.
Kamal warbled in a shrill voice in praise of the bride’s beauty, a beauty
she had never seen. She had been born blind, and her mother, none of whose
sons had survived, had named her Kamal in the hope that she would have a
son, which she did!
The girls sang the refrain:
There’s excitement at Abu Shu‘ayshi’s house . . . 
She’s a pretty young thing, and leaves nothing to be desired.
As the long-awaited final scene was about to begin, the groom entered,
causing a great stir among the guests. They all stood around him with hands
raised as people clapped with a single, if uneven rhythm. The women did
a group dance, hopping and stamping as they pushed the groom in the 
direction of the bride, who gazed at him furtively through the openings in
her white veil. Then he sat down beside her in a corner of the room that had
been decorated with palm leaves. He lifted her veil and took a sip of the drink
with her, then carried her a few steps into the house of his father, who had
reserved  for  him  and  his  brother’s  daughter  a  new  room  that  he’d  built 
recently on the roof of his house. Successive gunshots rang out from the
mouths of the sentinels’ rifles, while tambourines jangled and the girls sang:



Do'stlaringiz bilan baham:
1   ...   11   12   13   14   15   16   17   18   19


Ma'lumotlar bazasi mualliflik huquqi bilan himoyalangan ©fayllar.org 2019
ma'muriyatiga murojaat qiling