Writing Egypt Content Final Writing Egypt 07. 07. 10 13: 39 Seite 1


Download 4 Mb.
Pdf просмотр
bet19/19
Sana15.12.2019
Hajmi4 Mb.
1   ...   11   12   13   14   15   16   17   18   19
woh-woh-woh-
woh so I summarize: “The main thing is, in a place in one of his most famous
novels, he’s telling about a kid who goes to get wisdom from some big-shot
who’s living on his own in a palace.”
“Cut to the chase.”
Ignoring his great performance I continue: “The sage gives him a spoon
with a drop of oil in it and tells him to enter the palace right foot first and to
334
A H M E D A L A I DY
Writing Egypt_Chapters_Final_Layout 1  07.07.10  09:58  Seite 334    (Schwarz Auszug)

look around and observe without spilling the drop of oil. The kid goes into
the palace and comes out again with the oil in the spoon just as it was and
right as rain. The sage asks him, ‘What did you see inside the palace?’ The kid
tells him, ‘Nothing. I was too afraid of spilling the drop of oil.’ So the sage
sends him back again with the same drop of oil and tells him that this time
he’s to take note of the things in the palace. The second time, the kid stares
and notes everything carefully and then goes back to him and the sage says,
‘What did you see?’ and he tells him, ‘I saw a bunch of paintings and a bunch of
carpets and a whole bunch of other weird stuff’ and the sage points to the spoon
and says to him, ‘Yes. But you spilled the drop of oil, my little chickadee!’”
And the moral is?
“You have to enjoy the world without spilling the drop of oil you have 
inside you.”
As I said this, I looked at Abbas through the grime on the mirror.
How pleasant it is to give one’s wisdom a workout from time to time!
(We do it all the time, to make others look less important, or more bad.)
“You think so?”
“Of course.”
(Improve your intellectual image and the shortcomings of others will 
automatically appear.)
“What do I have to swear by to make you believe?”
“There is no god but God!”
“I never liked all those fancy stories and I really get pissed off by people
who write like they’re saying. ‘I’ve been shaving for four thousand years and
you’re still calling toffees ‘offees.’”
“Look, Abbas. Take it from your buddy here and then you can throw it
out the window: there’s nothing wrong with making mistakes. The only thing
that’s wrong is not admitting them.” Let’s hear it for all those who showed us
we’re not all alone at the bottom of the glass; there are those who are even
closer to the bottom than we are.
Let’s kiss the hands of all those who gave us a chance to scream at them:
“Get up and dust off your clothes!”
Blessed be the saint who gave us the chance to right ourselves every time
he stumbled.
335
A  D R O P  O F  O I L
Writing Egypt_Chapters_Final_Layout 1  07.07.10  09:58  Seite 335    (Schwarz Auszug)

A H M E D A L A I DY
336
“I have a slightly different perspective.”
“And what might that be?”
Abbas bares his teeth in a smile and says: “That sage guy wasn’t a lousy
sage or anything. He was just some piece of shit kid from the ’hood who’d
taken ruphenol and was getting wasted on his own so he said, I’ll get someone
and mess with his head a bit. Like, ‘Take this spoon, boyo, and wander around
inside and don’t spill any or there’ll be trouble . . . ’”
He said nothing for a bit and then went on:
“I bet you while the boy was holding the spoon and feeling his way with
his feet the guy who’d taken the roofies was rolling on the ground laughing
hard enough to bust his hernia. After a bit, he gets around to dissolving 
another couple of pills. . . .”
Zizzzt Zitttt.
“So then suddenly the roofies up and tell him to work the boy so he can
get the ‘mood’ up to ‘hyper.’ ‘Boyo, take the spoon and go back and take a
look at the pictures on the walls and the carpets on the floors the like of which
never entered your house except for your mother to wash.’ ”
Zizzzt. Zitttt.
“Ruphenol gives you the best high.”
“Sure, but what are you trying to get at?”
Abbas says that—Zizzzt. Zitttt.—he’s telling you that to arrive you first
have to leave.
And there are seven rules for leaving, as is well-known from the beginning
of time.
Translated by Humphrey Davies
Writing Egypt_Chapters_Final_Layout 1  07.07.10  09:58  Seite 336    (Schwarz Auszug)

AhmedAlaidy
Sources
from
Being Abbas El Abd, 2006
337
Excerptsorchaptersinthisbookarefrombookspublishedbythe
AmericanUniversityinCairoPressandcitedbelow.Copyrightiswith
theAmericanUniversityinCairoPressunlessotherwisestated.
Kent R. Weeks’s “Thebes: A Model for Every City” is from 
The Treasures of
the Valley of the Kings: Tombs and Temples of the Theban West Bank in
Luxor, edited by Kent R. Weeks, 2001.
Zahi Hawass’s “Women in Society” is from 
Silent Images (© Zahi Hawass), 2008.
Aidan Dodson and Salima Ikram’s “Egyptian Mortuary Beliefs” is from
The Tomb in Ancient Egypt (© Thames and Hudson), 2008.
Regine Schulz’s “Temples in the Middle Kingdom” is from 
Egypt: The World
of  the  Pharaohs,  edited  by  Regine  Schulz  and  Matthias  Seidel 
(© Tandem Verlag GmbH), 2000. 
Lise Manniche’s “The Egyptian Garden” is from 
An Ancient Egyptian Herbal
(© Lise Manniche), 2006.
Max Rodenbeck’s “Cities of the Dead” is from 
Cairo: The City Victorious
(© Max Rodenbeck), 1998.
André Raymond’s “Cairo: Fatimid City” is from 
Cairo: City of History
(© President and Fellows of Harvard College), 2001.
Jason  Thompson’s  “The  Mamluks”  is  from 
A  History  of  Egypt:  From 
Earliest Times to the Present (© Jason Thompson), 2008.
Lesley Lababidi’s “Muhammad Ali and Modernization, 1805–82” is from
Cairo Street Stories: Exploring the City’s Statues, Squares, Bridges, 
Gardens, and Sidewalk Cafés (© Lesley Lababidi), 2008.
Writing Egypt_Chapters_Final_Layout 1  07.07.10  09:58  Seite 337    (Schwarz Auszug)

338
Edward William Lane’s “Boo’la’ck” is from 
Description of Egypt, edited and
with an introduction by Jason Thompson, 2000.
Qasim Amin’s “The Family” is from 
The Liberation of Women and The New
Woman (translated by Samiha Sidhom Peterson), 1992, 1995, 2000.
Hassan Hassan’s “Marg” is from 
In the House of Muhammad Ali: A Family
Album, 1805–1952, 2000. 
Ahmed Fakhry’s “Siwan Customs and Traditions” is from 
Siwa Oasis, 1973. 
Cynthia Nelson’s “Storming the Parliament (1951)” is from 
Doria Shafik:
Egyptian Feminist (© Board of Regents of the State of Florida), 1996.
Nayra Atiya’s “Alice, the Charity Worker” is from 
Khul-Khaal: Five Egyptian
Women Tell their Stories, 1984.
Ahmed  Zewail’s  “First  Steps:  On  the  Banks  of  the  Nile”  is  from 
Voyage
through Time: Walks of Life to the Nobel Prize, 2002.
Jehan Sadat’s “On My Own” is from 
My Hope for Peace (© Jehan Sadat), 2009.
Galal Amin’s “Egypt and the Market Culture” is from 
Whatever Happened to
the Egyptians? Changes in Egyptian Society from 1950 to the Present, 2000. 
Bernard O’Kane’s “The Ayyubids and Early Mamluks (960–1170)” is from
The  Treasures  of  Islamic  Art  in  the  Museums  of  Cairo,  edited  by
Bernard O’Kane, 2006. 
Michael Haag’s “The Cosmopolitan Capital” is from
Vintage Alexandria: 
Photographs of the City 1860–1960 (© Michael Haag), 2008. 
Cynthia Myntti’s “The Builders and their Buildings” is from 
Paris Along the
Nile: Architecture in Cairo from the Belle Epoque (© Cynthia Myntti),
1999, paperback edition, 2003. 
Viola Shafik’s “Toward a National Film Industry” is from 
Popular Egyptian 
Cinema: Gender, Class, and Nation, 2007. 
Edward  W.  Said’s  “Farewell  to  Tahia”  is  from 
Colors  of  Enchantment: 
Theater, Dance, Music, and the Visual Arts of the Middle East, edited by
Sherifa Zuhur, 2001.  
Margo  Veillon’s  “Letter  to  Doris”  is  from 
Nubia:  Sketches,  Notes,  and 
Photographs, 1995.
Azza Fahmy’s “Jewelry for Special Purposes: The Zar Ceremony” is from 
Enchanted Jewelry of Egypt: The Traditional Art and Craft, 2007.               
Writing Egypt_Chapters_Final_Layout 1  07.07.10  09:58  Seite 338    (Schwarz Auszug)

339
Taha Hussein’s “Love Story” is from 
A Passage to France (translated by 
Kenneth Cragg, © E. J. Brill) in 
The Days, 1997. 
Tawfiq  al-Hakim’s  “Miracles  for  Sale”  is  from 
The  Essential  Tawfiq 
al-Hakim:  Plays,  Fiction,  Autobiography (translated  and  edited  by
Denys Johnson-Davies), 2008.
Yahya Hakki’s “Story in the Form of a Petition” is from 
The Lamp of Umm
Hashim and other stories, (translated by Denys Johnson-Davies), 2004.
Naguib  Mahfouz’s  “The  Father”  is  from 
Palace  Walk,  translated 
by William M. Hutchins and Olive E. Kenny, (volume I of 
The Cairo 
Trilogy), 1989. 
Gamal al-Ghitani’s “Naguib Mahfouz’s Chidhood” is from 
The Mahfouz
Dialogs (English translation © Humphrey Davies), 2007.
Samia Mehrez’s “Respected Sir” is from 
Egyptian Writers between History
and FictionEssays on Naguib Mahfouz, Sonallah Ibrahim, and Gamal 
al-Ghitani, 1994.
Khairy Shalaby’s “Fist Fight” is from 
The Lodging House (English translation
© Farouk 


Do'stlaringiz bilan baham:
1   ...   11   12   13   14   15   16   17   18   19


Ma'lumotlar bazasi mualliflik huquqi bilan himoyalangan ©fayllar.org 2019
ma'muriyatiga murojaat qiling