2. 1 What is a “signal”?


Download 0.84 Mb.
Pdf ko'rish
bet5/7
Sana18.09.2020
Hajmi0.84 Mb.
1   2   3   4   5   6   7

I

 



( )



( )



( )



(

)

/ 2, / 2



/ 2

2

2



/ 2

/ 2, / 2


/ 2

/ 2


2

2

0



0

u

1



u

u

1



1

1

1



2

2

a t



T

T

T

a t

a t

T

T

T

T

T

a t

a t

aT

e

t

e

t

e

t dt

T

e

dt

e

e

T

aT

aT







=

=



=



=

= −


=





P

 

 



Note that, if the observation interval time-length 

T

 grows, then 

the  average  power  tends  to  decrease  steadily.  If  the  average 

power is assessed over the whole of 

, it actually goes to zero 

(do the calculation on your own  ). 

Also  on your own consider the case 

0

 . Plot the resulting 

signal.  What  happens  to  the  average  power  when 



/ 2,

/ 2


T

T

= −


I

 and when 

=

I

 ?  


 

 

 



Signals and Systems – Poggiolini, Visintin – Politecnico di Torino, 2018/2019 

Solution

(

)



1

1

2



a T

e

a T

−  , 


 . 


 

Let  us  now  calculate  the  average  power  of  the  signal 

(

)

0



cos 2 f t

 over the interval 



/ 2,



/ 2

T

T

= −


I

 



(



)



(

)



(

)



(

)

( )



(

)

 



(

)

(



)

0

/2, /2



/2

2

2



0

0

/2



/2, /2

/2

/2



/2

0

0



/2

/2

/2



/2

/2

/2



0

0

/2



/2

0

/2



cos 2

1

cos 2



cos

2

1



1

1

1



1

1

1



cos 4

cos 4


2

2

2



2

sin 4


1

1

1



1

Sinc 4


2

2

4



2

2

1



T

T

T

T

T

T

T

T

T

T

T

T

T

T

T

T

T

T

f t

f t

f t dt

T

t

f t

dt

dt

f t dt

T

T

T

f t

t

t

f t

T

T

f

T











=



=

=



=

+



=

+





=



+

= +








=



P



(

)

0



0

0

1



Sinc 4

Sinc


4

2

2



2

2

2



2

1

1



Sinc 2

2

2



T

T

T

T

f

f

T

f T



 




+

− −


 







 





= +

 

Note that, if the observation interval time-length grows, then 



the average power tends to settle on the value ½. 

 On your own:  Show that when the average extends over the 

whole of 

 



(

)



0

1



cos 2

2

f t

=

P



 

 

 

 



Signals and Systems – Poggiolini, Visintin – Politecnico di Torino, 2018/2019 

3.2.1.1 Problems  

On  your  own:    find  the  average  power  over  the  intervals 



1,1



= −

I

 , 


 

0, 2


=

I

, and then over 

 of the signals:  

 

• 



1 1

( )


,

, 0


3 6

t



 

• 

0



2

1

j



f t

e



 , all three cases 

• 

2



2

cos(2


)

cos(4


)

2

a



b

a

t

b

t



+

+



, all three cases 

• 

1



5

cos(2


) sin(6

)

2



8

t

t



+

 , all three cases 



 

Try and discuss the results. Remember that: 

 

( )


( )

2

1



1

cos


cos 2

2

2



= +



 

( ) ( )


(

)

(



)

1

1



cos

cos


cos

cos


2

2



 


 

=

+



+

 



( )

( )


2

1

1



sin

cos 2


2

2



= −


 

( ) ( )


(

)

(



)

1

1



sin

cos


sin

sin


2

2



 


 

=

+



+

 



and of course: 

 

 

 



Signals and Systems – Poggiolini, Visintin – Politecnico di Torino, 2018/2019 

( )


( )

cos


sin

2

sin



cos

2







=







+

=





  

 

On your own: Redo the previous problems numerically using 



Matlab  and  verify  that  all  results  coincide  with  the  analytical 

ones. The code solving some of the problems is reported at the 

end of the chapter. 

3.3 

Energy 

In Physics, energy is the integral of instantaneous power over 

a  certain  time  interval.  In  signal  theory  we  adopt  the  same 

definition, so: 



 



1

1

0



1

0

0



2

,

( )



( )

( )


t

t

s

t

t

t

t

s t

P t dt

s t

dt

=

=



E



 

Eq. 3-3 

 

where 



 



0

1

,



( )

t

t

s t

E

 is the “energy operator” extracting the energy 



of 

( )


s t

 over the interval 

 

0

1



,

t t

=

I

By comparing Eq. 3-2 with Eq. 3-3 it is immediately seen 



that the following relationship holds: 

 



 


 



(

)



(

)



0 1

0 1


0 1

1

0



1

0

,



,

,

( )



( )

( )


s

t t

t t

t t

s t

s t

t

t

P t

t

t

=

 −



=

 −


E

P

 



Eq. 3-4 

 

 

 



Signals and Systems – Poggiolini, Visintin – Politecnico di Torino, 2018/2019 

 

In other words, the energy delivered over an interval 



 

0

1



,

t t

=

I

 

is equal to the average power over the same interval, times the 



length  (in  time)  of  the  interval.  Note  that  this  agrees  with  the 

concepts of energy and power from physics.  

Also note that the constant instantaneous power 

( )


w

P t 

( )


 

( )


0 1

,

( )



1

w

s

t t

P t

P t

t

=



 

delivers the same amount of energy over the interval 

 

0

1



,

t t

=

I

 

as the time-varying instantaneous power 



( )

s

P t

, similar to what 

we  discussed  in  Problem  3.1.1.1.  One  can  think  of 

( )


s

P t

  as  a 


“faucet”  pouring  a  time-varying  amount  of  Joules  per  second 

(i.e., Watts) into an “energy tub” over the interval  , totaling 



W

 

Joules. The same total of 



W

 Joules is delivered by 

( )

w

P t , over 

the same interval 



, namely:  

 


0 1

1

0



,

( )


s

t t

W

P t

t

t

=

 −  



Energy too can be computed over the whole of 

. In this case, 

differently  from  average  power,  we  do  not  need  the  “limit” 

operator  because  we  do  not  have  the  factor 

1/   before  the 

integral. So, we simply extend the integration range to the whole 

of 



 



2

( )


( )

( )


s

s t

P t dt

s t

dt



−

−

=



=



E

 

 



Again, depending on the signal, this integral may or may not 

converge.  



 

 

 



Signals and Systems – Poggiolini, Visintin – Politecnico di Torino, 2018/2019 

3.3.1 Examples 

Let  us  compute  the  energy  of  the  signal 

( )

0

T



t

  over  the 



interval 



/ 2,

/ 2


T

T

= −


I

, assuming 

0

T

T

 . Given Eq. 3-4 and 

the result from Sect. 3.2.1 , we can immediately write: 

 



( )




( )


0



0

0

0



/2, /2

/2, /2


T

T

T

T

T

T

T

t

t

T

T

T

T



=



 =

 =


E

P

 



 

Extending the calculation to 

=

I

 does not change the result 

at all: 

( )


( )



( )

 


0

0

0



0

0

0



2

/ 2


/ 2

0

/ 2



/ 2

1

T



T

T

T

T

T

t

t

dt

t dt

t

T

−





=

=



=

=



E

 



 

Why? Think about it on your own.   

 

We now consider again the signal 



( )

u

a t



e

t



0



 . We 

compute  its  energy  over  the  interval 



/ 2,



/ 2

T

T

= −


I

.  Once 


again, we could simply use Eq. 3-4 and the average power for 

the same signal and interval from Sect. 3.2.1 . For convenience, 

we redo the calculation: 

 


 

 

 



Signals and Systems – Poggiolini, Visintin – Politecnico di Torino, 2018/2019 



( )



( )

(

)



/2

2

/2, /2



/2

/2

/2



2

2

0



0

u

u



1

1

1



2

2

T



a t

a t

T

T

T

T

T

a t

a t

aT

e

t

e

t

dt

e

dt

e

e

a

a





=



=



= −

=





E

 



Eq. 3-5 

 

We now extend the calculation to the whole of 



. We can find 

the result directly: 

 

 


( )

2

2



2

2

0



0

0

( )



u

1

1



2

2

a t



at

at

at

s t

e

t

dt

e

dt

e

dt

e

a

a



−





=



=

=

=



=



E

 



 

or we can use the result in Eq. 3-5 and let 



→ 

. The two 

results clearly coincide. 

We  then  calculate  the  energy  of  the  signal 

(

)

0



cos 2 f t

  over 



the interval 



/ 2,

/ 2


T

T

= −


I

. We use Eq. 3-4 and the average 

power result from Sect. 3.2.1 . We can then directly write: 

 



(

)



(



)

0

0



/2, /2

cos 2


1+Sinc 2

2

T



T

T

f t

f T



= 



E

 



Eq. 3-6 

 

If  we try to  extend the energy calculation to 



=

I

, we now 

run into a problem. Either trying to extend the result of Eq. 3-6 

or trying to redo the calculation from scratch, the result does not 



 

 

 



Signals and Systems – Poggiolini, Visintin – Politecnico di Torino, 2018/2019 

converge.  In  both  cases  it  appears  to  indicate  an  “infinite 

energy”. This circumstance will be discussed in the Section 3.4.  

3.3.1.1 Problem 

Given the signal: 

 

( )


t T

s t

T



= 




 

find  its  instantaneous  power 

( )

s

P t

.  Then  assuming 

( )

s

P t

  has 


dimension kW (kiloWatts), find the energy in kWh (kiloWatt-

hour) delivered by 

( )

s t

 over the interval 



0, 2T



=

I

, where 


T

 is 


2  hours.  Finally,  find  its  time-averaged  power  over  the  same 

interval. 

 

Solution:  

2

( )



s

t

T

P t

T



= 




 

The  energy  delivered  over  the  time-interval 



0, 2T



=

I

  is 


exactly 

2

3



T

 (kWh). So, for 

2

=

 hours, the energy is 

4

3

 (kWh). 



The resulting time-averaged power is 

1

3



 kW. 

 

On  your  own:  Redo  the  calculation  above  using  Matlab,  by 



performing  numerical  integration.  Use  the  Matlab  command 

‘integral’. The solution is reported at the end of this chapter. 



 

 

 



Signals and Systems – Poggiolini, Visintin – Politecnico di Torino, 2018/2019 

 

On your own: what can you say about the average power of a 



signal whose energy, computed over the whole of 

, is finite 

and non-zero? After thinking about it, read on and see if your 

thoughts agree with what is written next. 



3.4 

Classification of Signals Based 

on Average Power and Energy 

Signals are typically divided into various classes depending on 

their energy and power properties. These properties will have a 

big  impact  on  certain  key  aspects  of  signal  analysis  and 

representation that will be introduced in the next chapter. 

3.4.1 Finite energy 

3.4.1.1 finite energy over a finite interval 

Finite  energy  signals  over  a  finite  interval 

 


0

1

,



t t

=

I

  are  all 

those signals for which: 



 



1

0

1



0

2

,



( )

( )


t

t

t

t

s t

s t

dt

=

 



E

 



 

All physical signals must satisfy this condition. 

As a sufficient condition for a signal to be finite-energy over 

a finite interval 

 

0

1



,

t t

=


Download 0.84 Mb.

Do'stlaringiz bilan baham:
1   2   3   4   5   6   7




Ma'lumotlar bazasi mualliflik huquqi bilan himoyalangan ©fayllar.org 2020
ma'muriyatiga murojaat qiling