2. 1 What is a “signal”?


Download 0.84 Mb.
Pdf ko'rish
bet6/7
Sana18.09.2020
Hajmi0.84 Mb.
1   2   3   4   5   6   7

I

, it is enough that it is limited over 

the interval, that is:  



 

 

 



Signals and Systems – Poggiolini, Visintin – Politecnico di Torino, 2018/2019 



2

0

1



( )

,

,



s t

C

t

t t

  =



I

.  

Eq. 3-7 

 

where 



  is  a  positive  and  finite  constant.  Note  that  this 

condition must be satisfied at the extremes of the interval, too. 

The same sufficient condition could also be written in terms of 

the instantaneous power of the same signal: 

 

 


0

1

( )



,

,

s



P t

t

t t

    =



I

 



This  means  that  every  signal  whose  instantaneous  power  is 

limited at  all times over 

 

0

1



,

t t

=

I

  also  has finite energy  over 

the same interval. 

Three of the signals that we looked at in the previous pages, 

that  is: 

( )

0

T



t

  ; 



( )

u

a t



e

t



(

)

,



0

a

a



(

)



0

cos 2 f t

,    are 



finite-energy  over  a  finite  interval,  as  the  results  of  the 

calculations in Sect. 3.3.1 show. 

Many  other  signals  are  not  finite-energy,  even  over  a  finite 

interval. For instance, the signals 

1

( )


s t

t

=



 or 

1/2


( )

s t

t

=



 have 

“infinite”  energy  over  the  interval 

 

0,1


=

I

.  Prove  it  on  your 

own. 

 

On your own: prove the sufficient condition of Eq. 3-7. 



Also,  try  and  find  the  mathematical  expression  of  another 

signal for which 



 



0

1

,



( )

t

t

s t

E

 is not finite.  



 

 

 



Signals and Systems – Poggiolini, Visintin – Politecnico di Torino, 2018/2019 

 

3.4.1.2 finite energy over the whole of   



Finite energy signals over the whole of 

 are all those signals 

for which: 

 


2

( )


( )

s t

s t

dt

+

−



=

 


E

 



 

The  three  signals: 

( )

0

T



t

  ; 



( )

u

a t



e

t



(

)

,



0

a

a



(

)



0

cos 2 f t

,  have  different  behavior  when  their  energy  is 



computed  over  the  whole  of 

.  Specifically: 

( )

0

T



t

  and 



( )

u

a t



e

t



(

)

,



0

a

a



  are  finite-energy  over 

.  Instead, 

(

)

0



cos 2 f t

 is infinite-energy, as the results of the calculations 



in Sect.  3.3.1 show. 

 

On  your  own:    which  of  the  signals: 



( )

t



( )

u

at



e

t

(



)

,

0



a

a



, and 

( )


0

2

u



j

f t

at

e

e

t



 

(

)



,

0

a



a



 is finite-energy 

over 


?  

Solution: 

( )


t

  and 



( )

0

2



u

j

f t

at

e

e

t



 

(

)



,

0

a



a



  are  finite 

energy over 

( )


u

at

e

t

(



)

,

0



a

a



is not.  

 


 

 

 



Signals and Systems – Poggiolini, Visintin – Politecnico di Torino, 2018/2019 

3.4.2 Finite time-averaged power 

3.4.2.1 finite  time-averaged  power  over  a  finite 

interval 

Finite-time-averaged-power  signals  over  a  finite  interval 

 


0

1

,



t t

=

I

 are all those signals for which: 

 



( )

 


1



1

0 1


0 1

0

0



2

,

,



1

0

1



0

1

1



( )

( )


( )

t

t

s

s

t t

t t

t

t

s t

P t

P t dt

s t

dt

t

t

t

t

=

=



=

 




P

 



Note that time-averaged power and energy are related through 

Eq. 3-4, which can be re-written as: 

 





( )

 


 



(

)

0 1



0 1

,

,



1

0

( )



t t

t t

s t

s t

t

t

=



E

P

 



Eq. 3-8 

 

Since, given a finite interval 



 

0

1



,

t t

=

I

, clearly: 

  

(



)

1

0



0

t

t



 

 



then it turns out that a signal 

( )


s t

 that has finite energy over an 

interval 

 


0

1

,



t t

=

I

 also has finite time-averaged power over the 

same  interval,  and  vice-versa.  In  other  words,  all  signals  that 



 

 

 



Signals and Systems – Poggiolini, Visintin – Politecnico di Torino, 2018/2019 

have  finite  energy  over 

 


0

1

,



t t

=

I



  also  have  finite  time-

averaged power over 

 


0

1

,



t t

=

I



 (and vice-versa). 

Put it another way, the set of all signals that have finite energy 

over 

 


0

1

,



t t

=

I

  coincides  with  the  set  of  all  signals  that  have 

finite time-averaged power over the same interval. This situation 

is depicted in Fig. 3.2 

 

 



Fig. 3.2 

 

On  your  own:  look  at  Sects.  3.2.1  and  3.3.1  and  check  that 



indeed 

( )


0

T

t



( )

u

a t



e

t

  with 



(

)

,



0

a

a



,  and 

(

)



0

cos 2 f t

 

are both finite-energy and finite average-power over any finite 



interval 

 


0

1

,



t t

=

I



3.4.2.2 finite time-averaged power over the whole of 

 

A  finite  time-averaged  power  signal  over the whole of 

  is 

such that:  



( )

 


2

2

2



2

2

1



1

( )


lim

( )


lim

( )


T

T

s

s

T

T

T

T

s t

P t

P t dt

s t

dt

T

T



→

→

=



=

=

 



P



 

Set of finite-energy signals over

Set of finite-average-power signals over

 


0

1

,



t t

=

I

 

0

1



,

t t

=

I



 

 

 



Signals and Systems – Poggiolini, Visintin – Politecnico di Torino, 2018/2019 

In the previous section (Section 3.4.2.1), we have seen that the 

set  of  finite  energy  signals  and  the  set  of  finite  time-averaged 

power  signals  coincide,  as  long  as  the  interval 

 

0

1



,

t t

=

I

  is 

finite. However, when the time-interval extends to all of 



, the 

situation is different. 

In  particular,  those  signal  that  have  non-zero  finite  average 

power  over 

,  that  is  0 

 

P

,  must  have  infinite  energy 



→ 

E

. This is enough to prove that the two sets (finite time-



averaged power and finite energy) do not coincide over 

This  situation  is  depicted  in  Fig.  3.3,  where  the  set  of  finite 



energy  signals 

E

  no  longer  coincides  with  the  set  of  finite-

average power signals 

P

.  


 

 

Fig. 3.3 

 

Another interesting result is that the signals in 



E

 all have zero 



average power over 

. This is obvious from  Eq. 3-8. Just let 

the interval 

 


0

1

,



t t

=

I

 extend to 

 and let’s discuss the right-

The two sets DO NOT coincide

E: set of finite-energy signals over

They all have zero time-averaged power over 

P: set of finite time-averaged-power signals over

If P is non-zero, they have infinite energy over

E

P


 

 

 



Signals and Systems – Poggiolini, Visintin – Politecnico di Torino, 2018/2019 

hand side: the numerator is finite over 

 by assumption, while 

the denominator grows to infinity. The result is zero. 

 

On your own: look at the results of Sects. 3.2.1 and 3.3.1 and 



check that:  

( )


0

T

t

E



 

( )


u

at

e

t

E



    

(

)



,

0

a



a



 

(

)



0

cos 2 f t

P



 

(

)



0

exp


2

j

f t

P



 

Verify also that the average power over 

 of the first two 

signals is zero. 

 

On  your  own:    when  both  power  and  energy  are  calculated 



over 

,  which  of  the  above  sets 



E

  and 


P

  do  the  following 

signal belong to?  

( )


t

  



( )

u

at



e

t

 

(



)

,

0



a

a



  

( )


0

2

u



j

f t

at

e

e

t



 

(

)



,

0

a



a



  

sign( )


t

 

Solution:  respectively, 



E

,  neither 



E

nor 


P

  (the  signal  is 

infinite average power), 

E



P

In your opinion, what is the difference between finite-energy 



and finite-power signals (over 

), in simple words? 



 

 

 



Signals and Systems – Poggiolini, Visintin – Politecnico di Torino, 2018/2019 

3.4.2.1 Optional:  Behavior  of  finite-average-power 

signals over finite time intervals 

One result that will be useful in certain calculations that will 

be carried out in future chapters is the following: 

 

finite-average-power signals (over 



) are finite-energy over 

any finite interval. 

 

In other words, given 



( )

s t

 such that 

( )

 


s t

 


P

, then: 


 



 

1

0



1

0

2



0

1

,



( )

( )


,

,

t



t t

t

s t

s t

dt

t

t

=

 



 


E

 



 

The reason is that if the above was not true, the right-hand-side 

of the average-power calculation would diverge for some finite 

value of . Instead, by definition of limit, the right hand side in: 

( )

 


2

2

2



1

lim


( )

T

T

T

s t

s t

dt

T

→



=

 


P

 



 

must be finite for all finite values of  , for the limit to exist. 

A  completely  equivalent  result,  which  will  be  used  in  later 

chapters,  has  to  do  with  the  so-called  “truncated  signal”.  A 

“truncated  signal” 

( )


0 1

[ , ]


t t

x

t

  derived  from  a  signal 

( )

x t

  is 


defined as follows: 

 


 

 

 



Signals and Systems – Poggiolini, Visintin – Politecnico di Torino, 2018/2019 

( )


( )

( )


0 1

0

1



[ , ]

0

1



0

1

[ , ]



,

0

[ , ]



t t

x t

t

t t

x

t

t

t

t

t

t t



=

 




 

 

The same signal can also be written as: 



 

( )


( )

(

)



0 1

[ , ]


1

0

1



0

0

1



,

2

t t



T

d

d

x

t

x t

t

t

t

t

T

t

t

t

t

t

=

 



+

= −



=

 


 

 

Then, the following holds: 



 

given a finite-average-power signals (over 

) any truncated 

signal derived from it is a finite-energy signal over 

 



In other words, 

( )


0 1

[ , ]


t t

x

t

 is finite-energy over 

, for any value 

of 


0

t

 and 


1

t

.  


3.4.2.2 Optional: further distinctions 

In fact, among all the finite time-averaged-power signals over 

   

(

 



P

), there are three disjoint sets:  

 

1.  signals for which 



 

E

 and 



0

=

P



 

2.  signals for which 

→ 

E

 and  0 



 

P

 



3.  signals for which 

→ 


E

 and still 

0

=

P



 

 

 

 



Signals and Systems – Poggiolini, Visintin – Politecnico di Torino, 2018/2019 

 

An example of the first category is 



( )

t

. An example of the 



second category is 

( )


cos t

. An example of the third category is 

the  signal 

(

)



1

4

1



u t

t

− 



.  On  your  own:  confirm  by  direct 

calculation that the energy of this last signal is infinite over 

and yet its time-averaged power is zero over 



 

 



 

 

 



Signals and Systems – Poggiolini, Visintin – Politecnico di Torino, 2018/2019 

3.5 

Questions 

3.5.1  

The speed of a car is given by the following “signal”:   

( )

( )


100

1

v t



t

=

 −



 

where the units of 

( )

v t

 are km/h and   is in hours.  

What is the average speed of the car over the interval 

 


0, 2

=

I

 

hours? And what is the average speed of the car over the interval 



0,10



 =

I

 hours?  

What  is  the  distance  travelled  by  the  car  over  the  interval 

 


0, 2

=

I

?  And  over  the  interval 



0,10

 =


I

?  How  does  does 

distance relate to time-averaged speed? 

Defining 

( )

a t

  as  the  car  acceleration  along  the  direction  of 

motion, i.e., 

( )


dv

a t

dt

=

 , find the average acceleration of the car 



over the same intervals mentioned above. 

Results 

( )


 

0,2


50  km/h

v t



=

 

( )



0,10



10  km/h

v t



=

 

The  distance  travelled  over 



 

0, 2


=

I

  and 


0,10



 =

I

  is  100 

km,  in  both  cases.  In  both  cases  corresponds  to  the  time-

averaged  speed,  times  the  time-length  of  the  corresponding 

interval. 


 

 

 



Signals and Systems – Poggiolini, Visintin – Politecnico di Torino, 2018/2019 

( )


 

( )


0,2



0,10

0

a t



a t



=

=  



Download 0.84 Mb.

Do'stlaringiz bilan baham:
1   2   3   4   5   6   7




Ma'lumotlar bazasi mualliflik huquqi bilan himoyalangan ©fayllar.org 2020
ma'muriyatiga murojaat qiling