Abct 53rd Annual Convention November 21–24, 2019


Partnering With Families in Therapy: Leveraging Family


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Partnering With Families in Therapy: Leveraging Family 

Processes in the Treatment of Anxiety Disorders

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Ryan Jacoby, Ph.D., Massachusetts General Hospital

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:  Eric A. Storch, Ph.D., Baylor College of Medicine

Earn 1 5 continuing education credits

Moderate level of familiarity with the material

Primary Category: Parenting / Families

Key Words: Families, CBT, Anxiety



Predictors of Changes in Family Accommodation During Exposure Therapy For 

Pediatric OCD

Hannah Smilansky, B.S., Massachusetts General Hospital

Jin Shin, B.A., Massachusetts General Hospital

Monica S. Wu, Ph.D., UCLA

Brent Small, Ph.D., University of South Florida

Sabine Wilhelm, Ph.D., Harvard Medical School; Massachusetts General Hospital

Eric A. Storch, Ph.D., Baylor College of Medicine

Daniel Geller, M.D., Massachusetts General Hospital

Ryan Jacoby, Ph.D., Massachusetts General Hospital

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An Initial Waitlist-controlled Evaluation of the iCALM Program—a Family-based, 



Videoconferencing-delivered Treatment For Early Child Anxiety Problems

Jonathan Comer, Ph.D., Florida International University

Jami Furr, Ph.D., Florida International University

Christiana Del Busto, Ph.D., Mental Health Interventions and Technology (MINT) 

Program, Florida International University



Karina Silva, B.A., Florida International University

Elizabeth Miguel, B.A., Florida International University

Anthony Puliafico, Ph.D., Columbia University Medical Center

Jonathan Comer, Ph.D., Florida International University

A Brief Intervention for Reducing Symptom Accommodation and Increasing 

Treatment Support Among the Family Members of Veterans With PTSD

Johanna Thompson-Hollands, Ph.D., National Center for PTSD

Ellen DeVoe, Ph.D., Boston University School of Social Work

Denise Sloan, Ph.D., Boston University School of Medicine & National Center for 

PTSD


Johanna Thompson-Hollands, Ph.D., National Center for PTSD

Secondary Benefits of a Group Intervention to Reduce Symptom 

Accommodation Among Caregivers of Anxious Relatives

Jonathan S. Abramowitz, Ph.D., University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Lillian Reuman, M.A., Veterans Affairs Boston Healthcare System

12:30 p m  – 2:00 p m 

Imperial Salon B, Marquis Level

Symposium 35

Trigger Warnings! Are They Helpful, Harmful, or 

Neither?

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Richard J. J. McNally, Ph.D., Harvard University

Earn 1 5 continuing education credits

Basic to Moderate level of familiarity with the material

Primary Category: Trauma and Stressor Related Disorders and Disasters

Key Words: Trauma, Resilience, Risk / Vulnerability Factors



Trigger Warnings: Effects on Psychological Resilience Across Populations

Payton J. Jones, M.A., Harvard University

Richard J. J. McNally, Ph.D., Harvard University

Benjamin W. Bellet, M.S., Harvard University

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The Trauma Centrality Profile and Psychophysiological Reactivity of Students 



Given Trigger Warnings

Madeline J. Bruce, B.A., St. Louis University

Trigger Warnings Are Trivially Helpful at Reducing Symptoms of Distress

Deryn Strange, Ph.D., John Jay College of Criminal Justice

Maryanne Garry, Ph.D., University of Waikato

Mevagh Sanson, Ph.D., University of Waikato

Trigger Warnings and the Neurotic Treadmill: Does it Matter if We Expand the 

Definition of Violence?

Richard J. J. McNally, Ph.D., Harvard University

Payton J. Jones, M.A., Harvard University

12:30 p m  – 2:00 p m 

M106-M107, Marquis Level

Symposium 36

Responding to Stress Early in Life: Bench-to-bedside 

Implications For Regulating Emotions

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Jennifer Pearlstein, M.A., University of California, Berkeley

 

Victoria E. Cosgrove, Ph.D., Stanford University School of 

Medicine

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:  Patricia Brennan, Ph.D., Emory University

Earn 1 5 continuing education credits

All levels of familiarity with the material

Primary Category: Transdiagnostic

Key Words: Violence / Sexual Assault, Risk / Vulnerability Factors, Translational Research



State-based Alterations in Cognitive Control as a Transdiagnostic Risk Factor For 

Psychopathology

Sheri Johnson, Ph.D., Clinical Science Program

Kiana Mondavi, B.A., Clinical Science Program

Andrew Peckham, Ph.D., Clinical Science Program

Charles Carver, Ph.D., Department of Psychology

Jennifer Pearlstein, M.A., University of California, Berkeley

Psychobiological Implications of Responding to Stress Within the Context of 

Pediatric Depression

Jennifer Pearlstein, M.A., University of California, Berkeley

Nishita Berla, Psy.D., Kaiser Redwood City

Victoria E. Cosgrove, Ph.D., Stanford University School of Medicine

114 • Friday

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Effects of Acute and Chronic Sexual Minority Stressors on The Health and 



Wellbeing of Sexual and Gender Minorities Assigned Female at Birth

Gregory Swann, M.A., Northwestern Institute for Sexual and Gender Minority Health 

and Wellbeing



Michael Newcomb, Ph.D., Feinberg School of Medicine

Sarah W. Whitton, Ph.D., University of Cincinnati

Real World-implications For Addressing Stress Related Emotional Reactivity in 

an Evidence-based Practice

Lata McGinn, Ph.D., Ferkauf Graduate School

Alec Miller, Psy.D., Cognitive Behavioral Consultants

Casey O’Brien, Psy.D., Cognitive Behavioral Consultants

12:30 p m  – 2:00 p m 

M304, Marquis Level

Symposium 37

Using Technology to Enhance Cognitive-behavioral 

Interventions and Reduce Barriers to Access

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Jennifer Buchholz, M.A., UNC Chapel Hill

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:  Jonathan S. Abramowitz, Ph.D., University of North Carolina at 

Chapel Hill



Earn 1 5 continuing education credits

Moderate level of familiarity with the material

Primary Category: Treatment - CBT

Key Words: CBT, Technology / Mobile Health, Dissemination



Employee Assistant Programs as a Dissemination Tool For Internet-based 

Cognitive-behavioral Interventions

Navya Singh, Psy.D., WayForward

Samantha N. Hellberg, B.A., University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Jonathan S. Abramowitz, Ph.D., University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Jennifer Buchholz, M.A., UNC Chapel Hill

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Technology-Enhanced Behavioral Parent Training: Lessons Learned & Future 



Directions

Margaret Anton, Ph.D., MUSC

Alexis Georgeson, M.A., University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

April Highlander, M.A., UNC Chapel Hill

Raelyn Loiselle, M.A., UNC chapel Hill

Patrick Turner, B.A., UNC Chapel Hill

Chloe Zachary, M.A., UNC Chapel Hill

Nicole Lafko Bresland, Ph.D., UVM

Rex Forehand, Ph.D., UVM

Olga Khavjou, M.A., RTI

Deborah J. Jones, Ph.D., UNC Chapel Hill

HabitWorks: Smartphone-delivered Cognitive Bias Modification For 

Interpretation

Ramya Ramadurai, B.S., McLean Hospital

Kirsten Christensen, M.A., University of Massachusetts Boston

Thrösur Björgvinnson, Ph.D., ABPP, McLean Hospital/Harvard Medical School

Courtney Beard, Ph.D., McLean Hospital/Harvard Medical School

Using Technology to Extend Childhood Anxiety Treatment Out of the Office

Stephen Whiteside, Ph.D., Mayo Clinic

Reaching Underserved Populations: Spanish Translation and Modification of 

MindTrails, an Online, Anxiety-reduction Cognitive Bias Modification Program

Sofia Espinosa, University of Virginia

Bethany A. Teachman, Ph.D., University of Virginia

Claudia P. Calicho-Mamani, B.A., University of Virginia

116 • Friday

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12:30 p m  – 2:00 p m 



Marquis Salon C, Marquis Level

Symposium 68

Does How We Implement an EBT Matter? Measuring 

the Process of Therapy

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Jenelle Nissley-Tsiopinis, Ph.D., Children’s Hospital of 

Philadelphia

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:  Anne Marie Albano, ABPP, Ph.D., Columbia University 

Medical Center



Earn 1 5 continuing education credits

All levels of familiarity with the material

Primary Category: ADHD - Child

Key Words: Therapy Process, ADHD, Anxiety



Youth and Therapist In-session Behaviors: Relationships With Youth Anxiety 

Treatment Outcomes

Philip C. Kendall, Ph.D., Temple University

Erika Crawford, M.A., Temple University

Understanding Processes that Promote the Efficacy of Organizational Skills 

Training in Schools

Jenelle Nissley-Tsiopinis, Ph.D., Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia

Phylicia Fitzpatrick-Fleming, Ph.D., Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia

Alex Holdaway, Ph.D., Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia

Howard Abikoff, Ph.D., NYU School of Medicine

Richard Gallagher, Ph.D., New York University School of Medicine

Jennifer Mautone, Ph.D., Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia & Perelman School of 

Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania



Katie Tremont, MPH, Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia

Ami Kumar, M.Ed., Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia

Thomas Power, Ph.D., Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia & Pearlman School of 

Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania



Cristin Montalbano, Ph.D., Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia

Friday • 117

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Content and Process Fidelity Coding: Preliminary Insights From an Ongoing 



Multisite Pilot Trial of ADHD Bootcamp

Jason Fogler, Ph.D., Boston Children’s Hospital & Harvard University

Jenelle Nissley-Tsiopinis, Ph.D., Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia

Jennifer Mautone, Ph.D., Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia & Perelman School of 

Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania



Joanna Guiet, B.Sc., Université du Québec en Outaouais

Nicole Melita, M.A., Clark University

Virginie Leblanc, B.Sc., Université du Québec en Outaouais

Marilyn Featherston, M.D., Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia

Thomas Power, Ph.D., Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia & Pearlman School of 

Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania



Sébastien Normand, Ph.D., Université du Québec en Outaouais & Hôpital Montfort

Assessment of Treatment Integrity in a Dual-Site Randomized Clinical Trial of 

Parental Friendship Coaching Intervention

Amori Y. Mikami, Ph.D., The University of British Columbia

Sébastien Normand, Ph.D., Université du Québec en Outaouais & Hôpital Montfort

Jennifer Jiwon Na, M.A., The University of British Columbia

1:00 p m  – 3:00 p m 

A703, Atrium Level

Master Clinician 2

Evidence-Based Assessment and Treatment of 

Bipolar Disorder and Mood Dysregulation in 

Youth and Early Adulthood

Eric A. Youngstrom, Ph.D., University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Mary A. Fristad, ABPP, Ph.D., The Ohio State University

Earn 2 continuing education credits

Moderate level of familiarity with the material

Primary Category: Bipolar Disorders

Key Words: Bipolar Disorders, Emotion Regulation, Mood

Mood dysregulation is one of the biggest problems in childhood, and it often wors-

ens in adolescence and early adulthood. Yet there has been much uncertainty about how 

to conceptualize these problems diagnostically. DSM-5 added a new diagnosis, creating 

another label, but without an evidence base about course or treatment. Fortunately, there 

has been a surge of evidence about the validity of carefully diagnosed mood disorders in 

youth, along with better evidence-based tools for assessment and treatment. This semi-

nar discusses key assessment and therapy issues, including: how bipolar and other mood 

disorders manifest clinically, presentation similarities and differences in children versus 



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adults, how to use self-report and parent-report measures to aid diagnosis and treatment, 



and specific treatment strategies. We summarize the available biological interventions, em-

phasizing what non-prescribing clinicians need to know about these treatments. We then 

concentrate on how to implement therapeutic techniques used in individual-family and 

multifamily psychoeducational psychotherapy, one of the most promising evidence-based 

approaches to managing mood dysregulation in youth. This program will utilize lecture 

format, case presentations, demonstrations, role-plays, and question-and-answer periods. 

Often challenging conventional wisdom, the seminar presents new evidence from NIMH 

grants that can be applied immediately in practice.

At the end of this session, the learner will be able to:

•  Describe the use of evidence-based assessment methods that aid in differential 

diagnosis and measuring treatment response.

•  Recognize which symptoms and risk factors are helpful in recognizing bipolar 

disorder, and which may be “red herrings” that are common to other conditions.

•  Explain how to adapt specific therapeutic techniques to treat youth with bipolar 

disorder and other mood dysregulation.

•  Identify how to apply specific therapeutic techniques to address family concerns 

about mood dysregulation and treatment.

•  Explain how to integrate a conceptual model for working within systems-of-care 

into your practice with cases dealing with mood dysregulation.

Recommended Readings: Freeman, A.J., Youngstrom, E.A., Youngstrom, J.K., & Fin-

dling, R.L. (2016). Disruptive mood dysregulation disorder in a community mental 

health clinic: Prevalence, comorbidity and correlates. Journal of Child and Adolescent 

Psychopharmacology, 6, 123-130. doi:10.1089/cap.2015.0061. Fristad, M.A. (2016). Evi-

dence-based psychotherapies and nutritional interventions for children with bipolar spec-

trum disorders and their families. Journal of Clinical Psychiatry, 77(suppl 3):e04. PMID: 

27570930 Goldstein, B., Birmaher, B., Carlson, G., DelBello, M., Findling, R., Fristad, 

M., ... Youngstrom, E. (2018). The International Society for Bipolar Disorders Task Force 

Report on pediatric bipolar disorder: Knowledge to date and directions for future re-

search. Bipolar Disorders. doi:10.1111/bdi.12556 Van Meter, A. R., Youngstrom, E. A., 

Birmaher, B., Fristad, M. A., Horwitz, S. M., Frazier, T. W., . . . Findling, R. L. (2017). Lon-

gitudinal course and characteristics of cyclothymic disorder in youth. Journal of Affective 

Disorders, 215, 314-322. doi:http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jad.2017.03.019 Youngstrom, 

E.A., Choukas-Bradley, S., Calhoun, C.D., & Jensen-Doss, A. (2015). Clinical guide to 

the evidence-based assessment approach to diagnosis and treatment. Cognitive and Behav-

ioral Practice, 22, 20-35. doi: 10.1016/j.cbpra.2013.12.005



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1:00 p m  – 2:30 p m 



M102, Marquis Level

Mini Workshop 6

How to Integrate Mindfulness into a Cognitive 

Behavior Therapy Framework

Judith S. Beck, Ph.D., Beck Institute for Cognitive Behavior Therapy

Robert K. Hindman, Ph.D., Beck Institute for Cognitive Behavior Therapy

Earn 1 5 continuing education credits

Moderate level of familiarity with the material

Primary Category: Treatment - CBT

Key Words: Mindfulness, Cognitive Therapy, CBT

Many CBT clinicians use mindfulness as a stand-alone technique, either during treat-

ment or at the end of treatment (to reduce relapse). But using an individualized case con-

ceptualization to integrate mindfulness into CBT can make this intervention much more 

powerful. When clients engage in an unhelpful thought process, such as worry or rumina-

tion, Socratic questioning and guided discovery are often insufficient. These clients need 

to learn a different way to relate to their thoughts and emotions. And there are a number 

of techniques that CBT therapists should use before introducing mindfulness. It is import-

ant to identify maladaptive beliefs about thoughts, thought processes, and emotions. For 

example, many clients believe that a thought process such as worry or rumination will help 

them in some way. They also often believe that internal experiences such as thoughts and 

emotions are uncontrollable and/or could lead to a highly negative outcome. Participants in 

this workshop will learn how to set up mindfulness exercises by evaluating maladaptive be-

liefs using cognitive restructuring. They will also learn how to set up mindfulness exercises as 

behavioral experiments, both to evaluate maladaptive beliefs and to teach clients an adaptive 

approach to relate to their experiences. Strategies to induce maladaptive cognitive and emo-

tional experiences in-session prior to mindfulness practice will be discussed and demonstrat-

ed. Participants will learn how these strategies can help clients generalize the mindfulness 

strategies learned in-session to their real-world experiences outside of session. This workshop 

will incorporate both didactic instruction and experiential mindfulness exercises designed to 

simulate how mindfulness is used in a therapy session.

At the end of this session, the learner will be able to:

•  Describe how mindfulness strategies fit into a Cognitive Behavior Therapy 

framework.

•  Identify beliefs about thoughts, thought processes, and emotions that can be 

targeted during mindfulness meditations.

•  Conduct mindfulness meditations designed to evaluate beliefs about thoughts, 

thought processes, and emotions.


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Recommended Readings: Fresco, D. M., & Mennin, D. S. (2018). All together now: 

Utilizing common functional change principles to unify cognitive behavioral and mindful-

ness-based therapies. Current Opinion in Psychology, 28, 65-70. Hindman, R. K., Glass, 

C. R., Arnkoff, D. B., & Maron, D. D. (2015). A comparison of formal and informal 

mindfulness programs for stress reduction in university students. Mindfulness, 4, 873-884.

Wells, A. (2009). Metacognitive therapy for anxiety and depression. New York: Guilford 

Press.


1:00 p m  – 2:30 p m 

M103, Marquis Level

Mini Workshop 7

Stronger Than OCD: Engaging Youth in Exposure and 

Ritual Prevention Treatment

Joanna Robin, Ph.D., Westchester Anxiety Treatment  

Psychological Services, PC



Anthony Puliafico, Ph.D., Columbia University Medical Center

Earn 1 5 continuing education credits

Basic to Moderate level of familiarity with the material

Primary Category: Child / Adolescent - Anxiety

Key Words: OCD (Obsessive Compulsive Disorder), Child, Exposure

Exposure and ritual prevention (EX/RP) is the front-line therapeutic intervention for 

pediatric obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), with a substantial evidence base support-

ing its use (Abramowitz et al., 2005). However, guiding children and families through the 

treatment process remains a challenge, as evidenced by estimated attrition rates as high 

as 10-20% (Franklin et al., 2015). When initiating treatment, children and families often 

express concern about facing anxiety-provoking situations and removing rituals on which 

they have come to rely. Effective treatment of pediatric OCD therefore requires a therapist 

to develop strong therapeutic alliance, provide a rationale for treatment in child-friendly 

terms, and build a child’s confidence and willingness to participate in potentially difficult 

EX/RP tasks. This mini workshop will focus on teaching clinicians to conduct EX/RP 

with youth in a lively and engaging manner. Through live demonstrations, video, and role 

plays, the presenters will guide attendees through the various components of EX/RP treat-

ment, including psychoeducation and normalizing OCD symptoms for youth, identifying 

the function of OCD symptoms, building an exposure hierarchy, cognitive strategies, and 

gradual EX/RP. The presenters will demonstrate creative activities to bring treatment con-

cepts to life. Ample time will be spent reviewing child-friendly exposure ideas for the range 

of common pediatric OCD symptoms. The presenters will discuss strategies to effectively 


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involve parents in treatment. Finally, the presenters will discuss common pitfalls in the 



treatment of pediatric OCD and how to overcome them.

At the end of this session, the learner will be able to:

•  Better understand the challenges of providing effective treatment for pediatric 

OCD.


•  Apply concrete strategies to improve engagement of youth in EX/RP treatment.

•  Generate and execute creative exposures that are geared for youth



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