Abct 53rd Annual Convention November 21–24, 2019


Improving Measurement-Based Care for Youth With Multiple Domains of


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Improving Measurement-Based Care for Youth With Multiple Domains of 

Assessment and Early Warning Signals

Craig E. Henderson, Ph.D., Sam Houston State University

Susan Douglas, Ph.D., Vanderbilt University

Amanda Jensen-Doss, Ph.D., University of Miami

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Using Measurement Feedback Systems to Inform Complex Clinical Decisions



Jennifer Regan, Ph.D., Hathaway-Sycamores Child and Family Services

Katherine Tsai, Ph.D., Five Acres-The Boys’ and Girls’ Aid Society of Los Angeles

Andrew Moskowitz, Ph.D., Hulu

Eric Daleiden, Ph.D., PracticeWise, LLC

John Weisz, Ph.D., Harvard University

Bruce F. Chorpita, Ph.D., UCLA

Alayna L. Park, M.A., UCLA

2:30 p m  – 3:30 p m 

L508, Lobby Level

Symposium 42

Emotion Socialization Matters: Delving into the 

Complexities of the Relations Between Emotion 

Socialization and Youth Internalizing and Externalizing 

Symptoms

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Hair





Laura G. McKee, Ph.D., Georgia State University

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isCussant



:  Erin Tully, Ph.D., Georgia State University

Earn 1 continuing education credit

Basic to Moderate level of familiarity with the material

Primary Category: Parenting / Families

Key Words: Parenting, Emotion, Emotion Regulation



Daily Home Chaos and Mothers’ Dismissive Responses: Differential Effects of 

Children’s Internalizing and Externalizing Behaviors

Deyaun Villarreal, B.A., University of Texas at Dallas

Jackie Nelson, Ph.D., University of Texas at Dallas

Megan Adelson, M.A., The University of Texas at Dallas

How Socializing Youth Sadness, Anger and Anxiety is Differentially Associated 

With Internalizing and Externalizing Symptoms

Justin Parent, Ph.D., Florida International University

Laura G. McKee, Ph.D., Georgia State University

Psychosocial Adjustment in Adolescence: Contributions of Parent and Friend 

Emotion Socialization

Julie Dunsmore, Ph.D., Virginia Tech

Rachel Miller-Slough, Ph.D., Duke University Medical Center

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2:30 p m  – 4:00 p m 



Marquis Salon A, Marquis Level

Symposium 43

Religion and Spirituality in Couple Relationships: 

Building a Foundation For Expansion of Couple Therapy 

Research and Practice to Religious Couples

C

Hair





Victoria A. King, University of Georgia

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isCussant



:  Kristina Coop Gordon, Ph.D., University of Tennessee - 

Knoxville



Earn 1 5 continuing education credits

Basic to Moderate level of familiarity with the material

Primary Category: Spirituality and Religion

Key Words: Couples / Close Relationships, Spirituality and Religion, Prevention



Couples’ Spiritual Intimacy and One-upmanship Predicting Marital Conflict 

Across the Transition to Parenthood

Kenneth Pargament, Ph.D., Bowling Green State University

Alfred DeMaris, Ph.D., Bowling Green State University

Annette Mahoney, Ph.D., Bowling Green State University

Prayers of Gratitude, Dispositional Gratitude, and Marital Satisfaction: A Dyadic 

Perspective

Frank D. Fincham, Ph.D., Florida State University

Religiosity and Relationship Quality in Unmarried, Serious Relationships

Scott Stanley, Ph.D., University of Denver

Shelly Smith-Acuña, Ph.D., University of Denver

Galena K. Rhoades, Ph.D., University of Denver

Hannah Koch, Psy.D., University of Denver

Religiosity and Marital Integration in Enduring Marriages

Kandauda K.A.S. Wickrama, Ph.D., University of Georgia

Steven Beach, Ph.D., University of Georgia

Victoria A. King, University of Georgia

142 • Friday

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2:30 p m  – 4:00 p m 



Marquis Salon C, Marquis Level

Symposium 44

Utilizing Technology to Extend the Social Impact 

of Cognitive Behavioral Science in National and 

International Samples

C

Hairs





Sabine Wilhelm, Ph.D., Harvard Medical School; 

Massachusetts General Hospital

 

Nicholas C. Jacobson, M.S., Massachusetts General Hospital

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isCussant



:  Oliver Harrison, Ph.D., Telefónica Innovation Alpha

Earn 1 5 continuing education credits

All levels of familiarity with the material

Primary Category: Technology

Key Words: Technology / Mobile Health, Global Mental Health, Industry



Assessing Auditory Verbal Hallucinations in Real-time, Real-place With 

mHealth; Expanding Reach With Online Research Methodology

Rachel Brian, M.P.H., University of Washington

Geneva Kelly, M.P.H., University of Washington

Rui Wang, M.E., Dartmouth College

Weichen Wang, M.E., Dartmouth College

Andrew Campbell, Ph.D., Dartmouth College

Dror Ben-Zeev, Ph.D., University of Washington

Benjamin E. Buck, Ph.D., University of Washington

A New Smartphone App For Body Dysmorphic Disorder: Development and 

Pilot Testing

Hilary Weingarden, Ph.D., Massachusetts General Hospital/Harvard Medical School

Jennifer Greenberg, Ph.D., Massachusetts General Hospital/Harvard Medical School

Thomas McCoy, Ph.D., Massachusetts General Hospital/Harvard Medical School

Ilana Ladis, B.S., Massachusetts General Hospital/Harvard Medical School

Berta Summers, Ph.D., Massachusetts General Hospital/Harvard Medical School

Aleksandar Matic, Ph.D., Telefónica Innovación Alpha

Oliver Harrison, Ph.D., Telefónica Innovation Alpha

Sabine Wilhelm, Ph.D., Harvard Medical School; Massachusetts General Hospital

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Smartphone CBT for BDD: Initial Clinical Insights From Passively-Collected 



Smartphone Data

Aleksandar Matic, Ph.D., Telefónica Innovación Alpha

Roger Garriga Calleja, M.S., Telefónica Innovación Alpha

Oliver Harrison, Ph.D., Telefónica Innovation Alpha

Sabine Wilhelm, Ph.D., Harvard Medical School; Massachusetts General Hospital

Hilary Weingarden, Ph.D., Massachusetts General Hospital/Harvard Medical School

Digital Phenotyping in a Large Sample Across the Globe: Passive Digital 

Biomarkers of Anxiety Depend on the Global Geospatial Context

Nicholas C. Jacobson, M.S., Massachusetts General Hospital

2:30 p m  – 4:00 p m 

Marquis Salon D, Marquis Level

Symposium 45

Understanding Exercise Approach-Avoidance Behavior 

in Women to Inform Feasible Transdiagnostic 

Intervention Development

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Hairs





Samantha G. Farris, Ph.D., Rutgers, The State University of 

New Jersey

 

Kathryn A. Coniglio, B.A., Rutgers, The State University of 

New Jersey

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isCussant



:  Brandon Alderman, Ph.D., Rutgers, The State University of 

New Jersey



Earn 1 5 continuing education credits

Basic to Moderate level of familiarity with the material

Primary Category: Women’s Issues

Key Words: Exercise, Women’s Health



A Pilot RCT of a Fitbit-supported Lifestyle Physical Activity Intervention For 

Women With Depression in Alcohol Treatment

Claire Blevins, Ph.D., Brown University

Cynthia Battle, Ph.D., Brown University

Jennifer Read, Ph.D., University at buffalo

Michael Stein, M.D., Brown university

Ana M. Abrantes, Ph.D., Brown University

144 • Friday

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Pre-treatment Predictors of Exercise Adherence in Mexican American Women 



Enrolled in a Behavioral Weight Loss Intervention

Julia Austin, Ph.D., Palo Alto psychology

Ruth Sarafin, M.S., University of New Mexico

Jane Ellen Smith, Ph.D., University of New Mexico

Kelsey N. Serier, M.S., University of New Mexico

Intentional Avoidance of Physical Activity in Women With Migraine

J. Graham Thomas, Ph.D., Brown university

Ana M. Abrantes, Ph.D., Brown University

Frederick Godley, M.D., University Otolaryngology

Julie Roth, M.D., Alpert Medical School of Brown University

Richard Lipton, M.D., Albert Einstein College of Medicine

Jelena Pavlovic, M.D., Ph.D., Albert Einstein College of Medicine

Dale Bond, Ph.D., Alpert Medical School of Brown University

Samantha G. Farris, Ph.D., Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey

The Effects of Moderate-intensity Aerobic Exercise on Reward Eensitivity and 

Emotional Reactivity Among Women With Depressive Symptoms

Brandon Alderman, Ph.D., Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey

Christopher J. Brush, M.S., Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey

A Latent Profile Analysis of Motivation for Physical Activity Engagement in 

College Women and in Women With Eating Pathology

Edward Selby, Ph.D., Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey

Kathryn A. Coniglio, B.A., Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey

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2:30 p m  – 4:00 p m 



M106-M107, Marquis Level

Symposium 46

Lab-based Acquisition and Extinction of Conditioned 

Disgust: Novel Methods and Clinical Implications

C

Hairs





Hannah Berg, B.A., University of Minnesota

 

Shmuel Lissek, Ph.D., University of Minnesota

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isCussant



:  Bunmi O. Olatunji, Ph.D., Vanderbilt university

Earn 1 5 continuing education credits

All levels of familiarity with the material

Primary Category: Transdiagnostic

Key Words: Disgust, Anxiety, Research Methods



Generalization of Conditioned Disgust: Individual Differences and Comparisons 

to Conditioned Fear

Hannah Berg, B.A., University of Minnesota

Sam Cooper, B.A., University of Minnesota

Shmuel Lissek, Ph.D., University of Minnesota

Hannah Berg, B.A., University of Minnesota

Effects of US Memory Devaluation on Conditioned Disgust: Results of Two Pre-

Registered Studies

Iris M. Engelhard, Ph.D., Utrecht University

Gaëtan Mertens, Ph.D., Utrecht University

Iris M. Engelhard, Ph.D., Utrecht University

Disgust Revealed by Oculomotor Avoidance is Highly Resistant to Habituation

Thomas Armstrong, Ph.D., Whitman College

Edwin Dalmaijer, Ph.D., University of Cambridge

Thomas Armstrong, Ph.D., Whitman College

Disgust Conditioning as a Model for Food Avoidance Among Adolescents With 

Low-Weight Eating Disorders

Tom Hildebrandt, PsyD, Department of Psychiatry, Icahn School of Medicine at 

Mount Sinai



146 • Friday

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Learning and ‘Unlearning’ of Sex-disgust Associations: The Effect on Female 



Sexual Response

Stephanie Both, Ph.D., Leiden University Medical Center

Ola Pawlowska, M.S., Maastricht University

Charmaine Borg, Ph.D., University of Groningen

Philomeen Weijenborg, M.D., Ph.D., Leiden University Medical Center

Peter J. de Jong, Ph.D., University of Groningen

Stephanie Both, Ph.D., Leiden University Medical Center

3:00 p m  – 4:30 p m 

M103, Marquis Level

Clinical Roundtable 4

Intensive CBT for Youth With Anxiety and Obsessive-

Compulsive Disorders: Special Considerations For the 

Design and Delivery of Treatment

m

oderator



:  Taylor Wilmer, Ph.D., McLean Hospital

P

anelists





Shannon Bennett, Ph.D., Weill Cornell Medicine

 

Sarah H. Morris, Ph.D., Bradley Hospital

 

Kendra L. Read, Ph.D., University of Washington School of 

Medicine & Seattle Children’s Hospital



 

Michelle Rozenman, Ph.D., University of Denver

 

Lindsey Bergman, Ph.D., UCLA Semel Institute for 

Neuroscience & Human Behavior



Earn 1 5 continuing education credits

Primary Category: Child / Adolescent - Anxiety

Key Words: Anxiety, Child, Treatment/ Program Design

Exposure-based cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) is considered the gold standard 

for treating youth with anxiety and obsessive-compulsive disorders (OCD; Higa-McMillan 

et al., 2016). Increasing evidence suggests that CBT delivered in a brief, intensive for-

mat yields outcomes equivalent to traditional once-weekly CBT (Ost & Ollendick, 2017). 

Intensive treatment also offers notable advantages over once-weekly sessions, including 

increased retention of learning, decreased opportunities for avoidance, and faster reen-

try into activities of daily living. As such, specialty outpatient clinics now offer intensive 

CBT for youth with anxiety and OCD. However, considerable variety exists in intensive 

treatment delivery for this population, and clinics differ in their inclusion criteria, pro-

gram structure, and treatment duration. The goal of this clinical round table is to discuss 

special considerations for the design and delivery of intensive exposure-based CBT for 

youth with anxiety and obsessive-compulsive disorders in an outpatient clinical setting. 


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The moderator and five presenters are expert clinicians and researchers from specialty 



clinics at Bradley Hospital, University of Denver, McLean Hospital, Seattle Children’s 

Hospital, UCLA Semel Institute, and Weill-Cornell Medical Center. Presenters will brief-

ly describe their clinics, including intake procedures and program structure, and will then 

answer questions during a moderated discussion. Questions will address lessons learned 

during program development, costs and benefits of programming choices, incorporation 

of research, and strategies for patient and parent engagement. This round table will offer 

a unique opportunity for presenters to share challenges that have been faced and sugges-

tions for overcoming barriers to successful treatment implementation. Presenters will also 

discuss key research questions that have arisen from their intensive program experience. 

This round table will benefit both clinicians and researchers interested in understanding 

and providing this innovative treatment approach for youth with anxiety and OCD.

3:00 p m  – 4:30 p m 

M102, Marquis Level

Mini Workshop 9

Evidence-Based Treatment With a Higher Purpose: 

Spiritually-Integrated CBT

David H. Rosmarin, ABPP, Ph.D., McLean Hospital/Harvard Medical School

Earn 1 5 continuing education credits

Basic level of familiarity with the material

Primary Category: Spirituality and Religion

Key Words: Spirituality and Religion, Case Conceptualization / Formulation

In some respects, evidence-based treatment always serves a higher purpose in that it 

changes human lives by alleviating suffering and improving life. In other respects, however, 

the practice of CBT is anything but a spiritual enterprise, given that the vast majority of 

CBT clinicians receive no training in how to broach spiritual matters with patients, and 

many never inquire about this domain at all (Rosmarin, Green, Pirutinsky & McKay, 

2013). These limitations are significant when one considers that more than nine in ten 

Americans believe in God (Gallup Poll, 2011) and the statistical majority of psychotherapy 

patients wish to discuss spirituality in treatment (Rose, Westefeld, & Ansley, 2001). This 

workshop will present an easy-to-understand framework for CBT clinicians to conceptu-

alize the relevance of spirituality to a variety of mental health concerns, based on current 

research. Attendees will also emerge with concrete skills in how to implement a brief CBT-

based assessment of spirituality in clinical practice.

At the end of this session, the learner will be able to:

•  Describe at least three ways that spirituality/religion is functionally related to 

mental health.

•  Formulate spiritual resources and struggles in clinically meaningful terms.

•  Implement a brief CBT-based assessment of spirituality in clinical practice.


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Recommended Readings: Rosmarin, D.H. (2018). Spirituality & Cognitive Behavior 

Therapy: A Guide for Clinicians. New York: Guilford Press.Pearce, M. J., Koenig, H. G., 

Robins, C. J., Nelson, B., Shaw, S. F., Cohen, H. J., & King, M. B. (2015). Religiously 

integrated cognitive behavioral therapy: A new method of treatment for major depression 

in patients with chronic medical illness. Psychotherapy, 52(1), 56.Pargament, K.I. (2007). 

Spiritually integrated psychotherapy: Understanding and addressing the sacred. New York: 

Guilford Press.



3:00 p m  – 6:00 p m 

A601, Atrium Level

Workshop 7

ACT for Life: Using Acceptance and Commitment 

Therapy to Prevent Suicide and Build Meaningful 

Lives

Lauren M. Borges, Ph.D., Rocky Mountain MIRECC

Nazanin Bahraini, Ph.D., Rocky Mountain MIRECC

Robyn D. Walser, Ph.D., VA National Center for PTSD

Sean M. Barnes, Ph.D., Rocky Mountain MIRECC

Earn 3 continuing education credits

Moderate level of familiarity with the material

Primary Category: Suicide and Self-Injury, Treatment- Mindfulness & Acceptance

Key Words: Suicide, ACT (Acceptance & Commitment Therapy), Recovery

Suicide is a leading cause of death and competency in suicide risk assessment and 

prevention is a vital component of clinical practice. Yet responding to suicide risk can be 

a tremendous source of stress and place therapists at odds with their clients. Acceptance 

and Commitment Therapy (ACT) provides a powerful and balanced approach to suicide 

prevention by promoting life in addition to preventing suicidal behavior. The workshop 

will begin with a concise review of the literature on ACT and suicide. Then participants 

will learn to apply key components of ACT for Life, a brief empirically-based intervention 

developed via a formative evaluation with ACT and suicide prevention experts. Case ex-

amples and experiential exercises will be used to build skills for working effectively and 

compassionately with clients at risk of suicide, while still maintaining best practices for 

suicide prevention. We will identify therapist challenges to working with clients consid-

ering suicide and discuss methods for overcoming these barriers. Participants will learn 

how to maintain an ACT therapeutic stance when conducting suicide risk assessment, 

practice emphasizing function over form when identifying drivers of suicidal thoughts and 

behaviors, and create an ACT-consistent safety plan. We will demonstrate how to join with 


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clients in acknowledging and accepting the pain that leads them to desire death, while still 



empowering them to engage in values-consistent behavior, building a meaningful life of 

their choosing. This workshop will not include a comprehensive introduction to ACT and 

is recommended for attendees with at least some previous ACT training and experience.

At the end of this session, the learner will be able to:

•  Identify potential barriers to working effectively and skillfully to prevent suicidal 

behavior.

•  Create an ACT-consistent safety plan.

•  Explain how to use ACT to reduce suicide risk and help clients build vital lives 

they can choose to live.


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