Abct 53rd Annual Convention November 21–24, 2019


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10:30 a m  – 12:00 p m 

A702, Atrium Level

Research and Professional Development 2

Living as a Scientist-Practitioner: How to Conduct 

Research in Your Clinical Practice

P

anelists





Travis L. Osborne, Ph.D., ABPP, Evidence Based Treatment 

Centers of Seattle

 

Andrew White, Ph.D., Portland DBT Institute

 

R. Trent Codd III, Ed.S., Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy Center 

of WNC, P. A.

 

Jacqueline B. Persons, Ph.D., Oakland CBT Center



Earn 1 5 continuing education credits

Basic level of familiarity with the material

Primary Category: Professional / Interprofessional Issues

Key Words: Professional Development, Professional Issues, Assessment

These private practitioners will describe the strategies they use to conduct and publish 

research in their private practice settings. The presenters will cover the following topics: • 



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Choosing a good research question • Integrating science and practice by collecting data 



in clinical work to guide both the clinical work and to contribute to science • Integrating 

digital progress monitoring technology with multiple sources of research data • Designing 

and carrying out a single case experimental design • Informed consent and ethical review 

of practice-based research projects • Handling issues of time and money • Values, inter-

ests, and lifestyle decisions • Collaborating with others The presenters will begin with 45 

minutes of didactics and discussion of these topics, including descriptions of some of their 

research studies and publications. The panel will then divide into four breakout groups: 

Implementing digital technology (White), Single case experimental design (Codd), Ethical 

issues (Osborne), and Choosing a good research question (Persons). Attendees can select 

one of these breakout groups so they can get focused help for the challenges they confront 

in their own practice settings.

At the end of this session, the learner will be able to:

•  Identify one step s/he can take to conduct research in his/her clinical setting.

•  Identify one research question that s/he could investigate in his/her clinical set-

ting.

•  Name two strategies that s/he can carry out to obtain an ethics review of a study 



s/he wants to conduct in his/her clinical practice setting.

Recommended Readings: Codd III, R. T. (Ed.) (2018). Practice-Based Research: A Guide 

for Clinicians. New York and London: Routledge.Persons, J. B. (2007). Psychotherapists 

collect data during routine clinical work that can contribute to knowledge about mecha-

nisms of change in psychotherapy. Clinical Psychology: Science and Practice, 14(3), 244-

246.Hayes, S. C. (1981). Single case experimental design and empirical clinical practice. 

Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, 49(2), 193-211.



10:30 a m  – 12:00 p m 

Embassy E, Embassy Level, Hyatt Regency Atlanta

Autism Spectrum and Developmental Disabilities 

(ASDD) SIG

We will begin with an introduction and progress report from the past year, followed 

by a Keynote presentation by a scientific leader in the field, and the presentation of 

awards. We will conclude with a discussion of the strategic plan and goals for next year.



10:30 a m  – 11:30 a m 

Embassy F, Embassy Level, Hyatt Regency Atlanta

Spiritual & Religious Issues in Behavior Change SIG

At this year’s meeting, the SIG will discuss current research and developments in 

the field of spirituality and religion in psychology. Attendees will have time to network 

with others who share their interest in this area. Members and non-members are invited 

to attend.


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10:30 a m  – 12:00 p m 



Embassy D, Embassy Level, Hyatt Regency Atlanta

Child Maltreatment and Interpersonal Violence SIG

We will conduct elections as well as announce the winners of the Neil S. Jacobson 

Student Poster Award and the Deborah J. Rhatigan Early Career Award. Award winners 

will present their research. We will hold a membership networking session for students 

and early career members to meet with mid-career and senior members to discuss both 

research partnerships and career development.



10:30 a m  – 11:30 a m 

Marietta, Conference Level, Hyatt Regency Atlanta

Cognitive Therapy SIG

We will review efforts on social networking and dissemination, introduce new mem-

bers, review our mentorship program, poster session, etc. We will then have an invited 

guest speaker present new work in a relevant topic area. We are particularly interested in 

having students attend, but all are welcome – even if you’re not yet a member!

10:30 a m  – 12:00 p m 

M202, Marquis Level

Special Session

Review of the Latest ADHD Clinical Practice Guidelines: 

Practical Recommendations and Future Directions

Steven W. Evans, Ph.D., Ohio University

Thomas Power, Ph.D., Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia & Pearlman 

School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania



William E. Pelham Jr., ABPP, Ph.D., Florida International University, Center 

for Children and Families



Carla C. Allan, Ph.D., Children’s Mercy Kansas City & University of 

Missouri-Kansas City School of Medicine

Members of the Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) Clinical Practice 

Guidelines subcommittees for the American Academy of Pediatrics and the Society for 

Developmental and Behavioral Pediatrics will review the latest ADHD Clinical Practice 


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Guidelines with special emphasis on practical recommendations for research and practice. 



Similarities and differences between the two guidelines will also be highlighted as well as 

opportunities for future development.



10:30 a m  – 12:00 p m 

Imperial Salon B, Marquis Level

Symposium 129

Therapeutic Potential of Oxytocin for Improving 

Social-Cognitive Processes and Behavior in PTSD and 

Substance Use Disorders

C

Hair





Lauren M. Sippel, Ph.D., National Center for PTSD

d

isCussant



:  Angela Fang, Ph.D., Massachusetts General Hospital/Harvard 

Medical School



Earn 1 5 continuing education credits

Basic to Moderate level of familiarity with the material

Primary Category: Trauma and Stressor Related Disorders and Disasters

Key Words: Medication, Comorbidity, Social Relationships



Intranasal Oxytocin’s Effects on Social Cognition in Those With Co-morbid 

PTSD-AUD

Christopher Stauffer, M.D., UCSF

Tyler Morrison, M.D., UCSF

lize DeCoster, Ph.D., University Carlos III de Madrid

Jin Wen, B.S., University of British Columbia

Aoife O’Donovan, Ph.D., UCSF

Josh Woolley, M.D., Ph.D., UCSF

Christopher Stauffer, M.D., UCSF

Effects of Intranasal Oxytocin on Social Threat- and Reward-Related Effective 

Connectivity in Childhood Abuse-Related PTSD

Julianne Flanagan, Ph.D., Medical University of South Carolina

Kathleen Brady, MD, Ph.D., Medical University of South Carolina

Jane Joseph, Ph.D., Medical University of South Carolina

Lauren M. Sippel, Ph.D., National Center for PTSD

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Sex Differences in the Effects of Intranasal Oxytocin on Stress Reactivity and the 



Relationship to Childhood Trauma in Recreational Cannabis Users

Margaret Haney, Ph.D., New York State Psychiatric Institute & Columbia University 

Irving Medical Center



Jeanne Manubay, M.D., New York State Psychiatric Institute & Columbia University 

Irving Medical Center



Suzette Evans, Ph.D., New York State Psychiatric Institute & Columbia University 

Irving Medical Center



Stephanie C. Reed, Ph.D., New York State Psychiatric Institute & Columbia University 

Irving Medical Center



The Moderating Role of Infidelity on the Relation Between Oxytocin and 

Conflict Behaviors Among Substance Misusing Couples

Amber Jarnecke, Ph.D., Medical University of South Carolina

Sudie Back, Ph.D., Medical University of South Carolina

Kathleen Brady, M.D., Ph.D., Medical University of South Carolina

Julianne Flanagan, Ph.D., Medical University of South Carolina

Ruschelle Leone, M.A., Medical University of South Carolina

10:30 a m  – 12:00 p m 

Atrium Ballroom A, Atrium Level

Symposium 16

Beyond Symptom Remission: Using CBT to Empower 

Youth to Achieve Normative Developmental Milestones

C

Hair





Renae Beaumont, Ph.D., Weill Cornell Medicine, New York 

Presbyterian Hospital

d

isCussant



:  Cynthia Suveg, Ph.D., University of Georgia

Earn 1 5 continuing education credits

All levels of familiarity with the material

Primary Category: Treatment - CBT

Key Words: Social Skills Training, Emotion Regulation, Transdiagnostic



Improvements in Developmentally Appropriate Tasks Following Intensive Group 

Behavioral Therapy for Youth with Selective Mutism

Danielle Cornacchio, M.S., Florida International University

Natalie Hong, B.S., Florida International University

Jonathan Comer, Ph.D., Florida International University

Jami Furr, Ph.D., Florida International University

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Using a Serious Gaming Based CBT Intervention to Improve Social-Emotional 



Skill Development in a Transdiagnostic Sample of Youth

Renae Beaumont, Ph.D., Weill Cornell Medicine, New York Presbyterian Hospital

Amy Miranda, LCSW, Weill Cornell Psychiatry Specialty Center

Jennifer Schild, B.S., Weill Cornell Medicine, New York Presbyterian Hospital

Jo Hariton, Ph.D., Weill Cornell Medicine, New York Presbyterian Hospital

Barbara Flye, Ph.D., Weill Cornell Medicine, New York Presbyterian Hospital

Paul Sullivan, Ph.D., Weill Cornell Medicine, New York Presbyterian Hospital

Corinne Catarozoli, Ph.D., Weill Cornell Medicine, New York Presbyterian Hospital

Alisa Powers, Ph.D., Weill Cornell Medicine, New York Presbyterian Hospital

Andrea Temkin, Ph.D., Weill Cornell Medicine, New York Presbyterian Hospital

Justin Mohatt, M.D., Weill Cornell Medicine, New York Presbyterian Hospital

Shannon Bennett, Ph.D., Weill Cornell Medicine

Developmental Considerations in Adapting the Unified Protocol for Treatment 

of Emotional Disorders in Adolescents as a Group Therapy

Elizabeth Halliday, B.S., University of Miami

Niza Tonarely, M.A., University of Miami

Rebecca Grossman, M.S., University of Miami

Rebecca Ford-Paz, Ph.D., Ann and Robert H. Lurie Children’s Hospital of Chicago, 

Northwestern University



Caroline Kerns, Ph.D., Ann & Robert H. Lurie Children’s Hospital of Chicago; 

Feinberg School of Medicine



Jill Ehrenreich-May, Ph.D., University of Miami

Am I All Grown Up Yet? Developmental Milestones, Parents, and the Treatment 

of Anxiety in Emerging Adults

Anne Marie Albano, ABPP, Ph.D., Columbia University Medical Center

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10:30 a m  – 12:00 p m 



A701, Atrium Level

Symposium 17

The Wisdom of a Good Night’s Sleep: Sleep Disturbance 

as a Mechanism and Target of Treatment in Depression 

and Anxiety

C

Hair





Y. Irina Li, M.A., University of Rochester

d

isCussant



:  Michael L. Perlis, Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania

Earn 1 5 continuing education credits

Basic to Moderate level of familiarity with the material

Primary Category: Sleep / Wake Disorders

Key Words: Sleep, Depression, Anxiety



Positive Affective Reactivity Mediates the Association Between Sleep Quality and 

Daily Depressive Symptoms in Adolescents

Lisa R. Starr, Ph.D., University of Rochester

Y. Irina Li, M.A., University of Rochester

Temporal Relations Among Sleep Behaviors, Depression Symptoms, and Anxiety 

Symptoms During Intensive Cognitive-Behavioral Treatment

Carol Chu, Ph.D., Harvard University

Courtney Beard, Ph.D., McLean Hospital/Harvard Medical School

Thrösur Björgvinnson, PhD, ABPP, McLean Hospital/Harvard Medical School

Jacob Nota, Ph.D., McLean Hospital/Harvard Medical School

Treatment Targets For CBT-I in Individuals With Insomnia With and Without 

Depression

Colleen E. Carney, Ph.D., Ryerson University

Nicole E. Carmona, M.A., Ryerson University

Preliminary Evidence For the Efficacy of Cognitive Behavior Therapy For 

Insomnia (CBTI) for Concurrent Mood and Anxiety Symptoms

Bunmi O. Olatunji, Ph.D., Vanderbilt university

Rebecca C. Cox, M.A., Vanderbilt University

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10:30 a m  – 12:00 p m 



A705, Atrium Level

Symposium 18

Oppressed Identities and Healing: Streamlining 

Intervention Targets and Coping

C

Hair





Broderick Sawyer, Ph.D., Behavioral Wellness Clinic

d

isCussant



:  Broderick Sawyer, Ph.D., Behavioral Wellness Clinic

Earn 1 5 continuing education credits

All levels of familiarity with the material

Primary Category: Oppression and Resilience Minority Health

Key Words: Transdiagnostic, Oppression, Resilience



Racial Microaggressions and Preliminary Evidence for Emotion-Focused 

Conceptualization and Intervention

Broderick Sawyer, Ph.D., Behavioral Wellness Clinic

An Intersectional Model of Stress and Oppression in LGBTQ+ Teens of Color: 

Results From the 2017 LGBTQ+ Teen Survey

Terence Ching, M.Soc.Sci, University of Connecticut

The Role of Ethnic Discrimination and Coping Style on Comorbid PTSS and 

Chronic Pain

Destiny Printz, B.A., University of Connecticut

Transdiagnostic Psychological Skills Groups For Youth of Refugee and 

Immigrant Backgrounds: A Community-Based Participatory Intervention 

Project

Jeffrey Winer, Ph.D., Boston Children’s Hospital/Harvard Medical School

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10:30 a m  – 12:00 p m 



L504-L505, Lobby Level

Symposium 19

Novel Preventive Intervention Strategies For Couples 

and Families: Extending the Reach and Social Impact 

of CBT to Promote Relationship Quality and Adult and 

Child Well-being

C

Hair





Allen W. Barton, Ph.D., University of Illinois, Urbana-

Champaign

d

isCussant



:  Scott Stanley, Ph.D., University of Denver

Earn 1 5 continuing education credits

All levels of familiarity with the material

Primary Category: Couples / Close Relationships

Key Words: Couples / Close Relationships, Prevention, Families



MotherWise: Implementation and Preliminary Evidence of Effectiveness of a 

Perinatal Healthy Relationship Education Program For Disadvantaged Families

Galena K. Rhoades, Ph.D., University of Denver

Less is Not More: The Benefits of Couple Based Health Interventions

Kathryn Pollack, Ph.D., Duke University

Laura Fish, Ph.D., Duke University

Devon Noonan, Ph.D., Duke University

Kristina Coop Gordon, Ph.D., University of Tennessee - Knoxville

Effects of a Web-based Relationship Program on Co-parenting and Child 

Functioning

McKenzie Roddy, M.S., University of Miami

Emily Salivar, Ph.D., Nova Southeastern University

Maria Llabre, Ph.D., University of Miami

Amanda Jensen-Doss, Ph.D., University of Miami

Brian Doss, Ph.D., University of Miami

The Protecting Strong African American Families Program: Design, 

Implementation, and Long-term Outcomes For Couples and Children

Justin Lavner, Ph.D., University of Georgia

Steven Beach, Ph.D., University of Georgia

Allen W. Barton, Ph.D., University of Georgia

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10:30 a m  – 12:00 p m 



L506-L507, Lobby Level

Symposium 20

Moderators and Mediators in Adult Anxiety and 

Obsessive-Compulsive Disorders

C

Hair





Nathaniel Van Kirk, Ph.D., McLean Hospital/Harvard Medical 

School


d

isCussant

:  David Tolin, Ph.D., Institute of Living

Earn 1 5 continuing education credits

Moderate level of familiarity with the material

Primary Category: Adult Anxiety

Key Words: Anxiety, OCD (Obsessive Compulsive Disorder), Mediation / Mediators



Longitudinal Evaluation of Treatment Motivation in Intensive Residential 

Treatment for OCD

Nathaniel Van Kirk, Ph.D., McLean Hospital/Harvard Medical School

Mediators and Moderators in the Treatment of Anxiety and Depression

Miriam Ambrosino, B.A., Fordham University

Katherine Sheehan, Fordham University

Dean McKay, Ph.D., Fordham University

Lauryn Garner, M.A., Fordham University

Sudden Gains During the Cognitive-Behavioral Treatment of OCD

Jonathan S. Abramowitz, Ph.D., University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Jennifer Buchholz, M.A., UNC Chapel Hill

Predictive Influences of Genes in Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for Emotional 

Disorders: A Meta-Analysis

Lauryn Garner, M.A., Fordham University

Dean McKay, Ph.D., Fordham University

Emily Steinberg, M.A., Fordham University

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10:30 a m  – 12:00 p m 



L508, Lobby Level

Symposium 21

Families as a Source of Resilience for Youth Facing 

Stressors: Extending the Reach and Relevance of 

Family-Based Interventions

C

Hair





Nada M. Goodrum, M.A., Medical University of South 

Carolina


d

isCussant

:  Deborah J. Jones, Ph.D., UNC Chapel Hill

Earn 1 5 continuing education credits

All levels of familiarity with the material

Primary Category: Parenting / Families

Key Words: Families, Resilience, Underserved Populations



The Role of Social Support in the Relationship Between Mother-Child 

Attachment and Functioning in Youth Affected by Maternal HIV

Lisa Armistead, Ph.D., Georgia State University

Marya Schulte, Ph.D., University of California, los angeles

Debra Murphy, Ph.D., University of California, Los Angeles

Sae-Jin Kim, B.A., Georgia State University

Abuse-Specific and General Maternal Support Following Child Sexual Abuse: 

Relations to Child and Parent Reported Outcomes

Nada M. Goodrum, M.A., Medical University of South Carolina

Funlola Are, M.A., Medical University of South Carolina

David Solomon, Ph.D., Western Carolina University

Daniel W. Smith, Ph.D., Medical University of South Carolina

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