Assessment Schedule – 2012 Classical Studies: Explain in essay format an aspect of the classical world (90513) Assessment Criteria Achievement with Merit Achievement with Excellence Essay writing


Download 249.62 Kb.
Pdf ko'rish
bet3/3
Sana16.02.2017
Hajmi249.62 Kb.
1   2   3

Question Two 

Achievement 

Achievement with Merit 

Achievement with Excellence 

Examples of supporting evidence that 

lack specific detail might be:

 

The skills and personal qualities that were 



required by surgeons in the ancient world. 

Just like today surgeons in the ancient 

world had to be highly educated. They 

had to know about the anatomy of the 

people that they were operating on and 

they had to know how to do things like 

sew up wounds and set broken limbs. 

One specific skill that surgeons in the 

ancient world were required to have, 

according to Celsus, was the ability to 

use their left hand as well as their right, 

because sometimes it was difficult to get 

to different internal organs. Also 

according to Celsus, they had to feel pity 

for their patients.

 

Although all points might not be this well 



developed, an example of supporting 

evidence that is specific and detailed might 

be:

 

The skills and personal qualities that were 



required by ancient surgeon. 

Celsus sets out a number of qualities for a 

surgeon: they should be young, have a 

nimble but firm hand that does not shake and 

be able to use their left and right hands 

equally well. This is so that they can get to 

different internal parts of the body while they 

operate. They must also have good eyesight, 

because they are often required to look at 

very small veins, arteries and nerves. Celsus 

tells us that they must have certain personal 

qualities too, including courage because they 

must be prepared to cut at the right speed 

and to the right extent, even if the patient is 

screaming. 

 

An example of in-depth discussion of a part of the question might include:



 

The skills and personal qualities that were required by ancient surgeon. 

•  No particular education or training was specifically required for a 

surgeon. Indeed, there was no board or group, which regulated medical 

practice in any way; a surgeon gained and maintained his reputation by 

word of mouth. 

•  Knowledge of anatomy is clearly critical for surgeons who operate 

internally or act to set broken bones. The best training for this was study 

at Alexandria, where the resources of the library and practical 

experimentation gave surgeons both knowledge and training in specific 

skills. 


•  Celsus, writing in the 1

st

 century CE, outlines the specific skills and 



qualities needed by a surgeon. It should be noted that this branch of 

medicine was seen as a specialist branch. Evidence for this comes from 

part of the Hippocratic Oath (voluntarily taken by general physicians), 

which specifically entreats the oath taker ‘not to cut’ and to stand aside in 

favour of men ‘who specialise in this craft’. 

•  Youth and agility are the first two requirements that Celsus sets out, to 

which he adds, perhaps not surprisingly, a hand that does not tremble. 

•  Celsus also recognises that the conditions under which surgeons often 

operate means that they should have keen and clear eyesight, given the 

relatively poor light and small detailed work on internal organs required. 

•  Above all else, as a personal quality, dauntless courage is a requirement 

for surgeons, but courage matched with a degree of sympathy for human 

suffering. 

•  Celsus explains that a surgeon must feel pity ‘to the extent of wanting to 

cure’ the patient, but not to be induced to work faster or cut less than is 

necessary. 

•  This also tells us that surgeons typically worked without anaesthetic. 

Opiates were known in antiquity, but an inability to regulate their precise 

impact meant that surgeons often preferred to use neither anaesthetic 

nor analgesic until after the operation. 



Other points may be made. The analytical quality of the argument is more 

important than the number of points listed.

 

 


NCEA Level 3 Classical Studies (90513) 2012 — page 13 of 16 

Question Three 

Achievement 

Achievement with Merit 

Achievement with Excellence 

Examples of supporting evidence that 

lack specific detail might be:

 

How Socrates used his own teaching 



methods and geometry to explain the 

relationship between length and area. 

Socrates asks a slave to work out the 

area of a square, the sides of which are 

2 units. He draws in the squares along 

this line and the slave correctly replies 

that the area is 4 square units. Socrates 

then asks the slave what the length of 

side of a square that has an area 

double the area of the original figure (ie, 

an area of 8 square units) will be. The 

slave incorrectly guesses a line 4 units 

long. Socrates proves that this is wrong. 

The slave then guesses 3 units, which 

is also wrong. Then, Socrates divides 

the square diagonally and shows the 

slave the correct answer, which is the 

square on the diagonal.

 

Although all points might not be this well 



developed, an example of supporting evidence 

that is specific and detailed might be:

 

How Socrates used his own teaching methods 

and geometry to explain the relationship between 

length and area. 

Socrates shows a slave how the length of a line 

and the square, which can be drawn on that line 

are related, but not in the way expected. Socrates 

begins by drawing a line, which is 2 units long and 

then drawing a square on that line, proving that it 

has an area of 4 square units. He then asks the 

slave how long a line that is the base of a square 

will be, when the area of the square is double the 

original, ie 8 square units. The slave immediately 

answers a length of 4 units. Socrates proves that 

this is wrong by drawing the figure and indicating 

that 16 square units is the area measurement. 

The slave then guesses 3 units (mid way between 

2 and 4), but is again shown to be wrong. 

Socrates then draws diagonal lines from corner to 

corner in the original square of 4 square units and 

asks the slave for the area, which he declares to 

be 2 square units. Socrates then repeats this 

process three further times with adjacent squares 

in order to show that the square on the diagonal of 

the original lines provides a square, the area of 

which is double the original figure. 

 

An example of in-depth discussion of a part of the question might 



include:

 

How Socrates used his own teaching methods and geometry to explain 



the relationship between length and area. 

•  Socrates is seeking to prove that mathematical and geometric 

knowledge is something innate for humans and that it can be 

extracted from even the dimmest human – a slave – by means of 

careful questioning. In short, this is an illustration of the Socratic 

method. 


•  Having established that doubling the length of a line increases its area 

exponentially – ie the length of the base of a square with area 4 

square units is 2 units; by doubling the length of the base to 4 units, 

the area of the square does not double, but is quadrupled.  

•  Socrates gives the slave a chance to guess two wrong answers (4 

and 3) for the length of a side, at which point the slave admits defeat. 

•  Socrates then takes the slave through a series of questions which 

draw out the answer from him. 

•  Socrates sets next to each other four squares each with an area of 4 

square units. He then divides the original square in half by dividing it 

from corner to corner with a diagonal line and repeats this in the three 

remaining squares. He then asks the slave whether he has a figure 

with 4 equal sides; the slave agrees and announces that it is a 

square. 


•  Socrates then has the slave count the area on the inside of the 

diagonal of each of the four squares. And the slave declares each to 

be 2 and that there are 4 of them, making a total area of 8 square 

units, the desired answer. 

•  Socrates then draws out from the slave the general principle that the 

square on the diagonal is twice the area of the original. Socrates calls 

the diagonal the ‘diameter’, a term used by the sophists. 

•  Socrates concludes by pointing out to the slave’s owner that what the 

slave did was ‘inside him’, and that Socrates had not told him 

anything, merely drawn out the answers by intelligent questioning. 



Other points may be made. The analytical quality of the argument is 

more important than the number of points listed.

 


NCEA Level 3 Classical Studies (90513) 2012 — page 14 of 16 

Topic E – Roman Religion 

Question One 

Achievement 

Achievement with Merit 

Achievement with Excellence 

Examples of supporting evidence that lack specific 

detail might be:

 

The ways an animal sacrifice might go wrong and 



precautions taken not to offend the gods. 

The selection of the sacrifice had to be appropriate 

to the god or goddess whose favour was sought. 

Male animals were sacrificed to male deities and 

female to female; pure white animals were selected 

for gods of the upper air and pure black to those of 

the underworld. After the appropriate sacrifice had 

been determined, an animal was purchased. The 

animal, once decorated with garlands, was led 

through the streets to the temple. It was regarded 

as a good sign if it went willingly. If it struggled, or 

worse still broke free, the procedure would have to 

be repeated. The time of the kill was a tense 

moment as a half-killed beast or one that ran away 

could ruin the sacrifice. 

 

Although all points might not be this well developed, an 



example of supporting evidence that is specific and 

detailed might be:

 

The ways an animal sacrifice might go wrong and 

precautions taken not to offend the gods. 

A sacrifice in fulfilment of a vow followed strict rules. The 

selection of the sacrifice had to be appropriate to the god 

or goddess whose favour was sought. Male animals were 

sacrificed to male deities and female to female; pure white 

animals were selected for gods of the upper air and pure 

black to those of the Underworld. In Virgil’s Aeneid

Aeneas sacrifices black victims before descending into 

Hades. After the appropriate sacrifice had been 

determined, an animal was purchased. To ensure the 

vitality of the gods was increased, the animal had to be 

healthy and vigorous. Deformity was seen as an insult to 

the gods. The animal, once decorated with garlands, was 

led through the streets to the temple. It was regarded as a 

good sign if it went willingly. If it struggled, or worse still 

broke free, then the animal was not auspicious and the 

procedure would have to be repeated. Precautions would 

also have to be taken to exclude foreigners and women. 

Cleanliness was essential; Livy tells the story of the 

Sabine who was cheated out of sacrificing a wonderful 

cow to Diana by a temple attendant who had told him to 

ritually cleanse himself first. The time of the kill was a 

tense moment as a half-killed beast, or one that ran away, 

could ruin the sacrifice. Any slip in procedure meant the 

entire ritual had to be repeated. In Virgil’s Aeneid, a 

sacrifice made by Dido where the holy water turned black 

and wine turned into blood gives an appreciation of how 

badly things could go wrong.

 

An example of in-depth discussion of a part of the 



question might include:

 

The ways an animal sacrifice might go wrong and 



precautions taken not to offend the gods. 

•  The sacrificial beast had to be appropriate for the 

deity in gender and colour. 

•  The victim needed to be healthy to revitalise the 

deity and attractively presented. 

•  Unsuitable spectators, who contaminated the 

ceremony, needed to be excluded. 

•  The animal had to go willingly to death.  

•  Extraneous noise had to be drowned out by music.  

•  Incompetence on the part of the priest (eg, in 

reciting the prayer) and / or sacrificial attendants 

(eg, the cultrarius in killing the victim) might 

invalidate the sacrifice. 

•  The entrails of the sacrificial beast might be 

defective and portend divine anger. 

•  Expiation ceremonies might be required to correct 

an identified procedural error. 

 

Other points may be made. The analytical quality of 



the argument is more important than the number of 

reasons listed.

 


NCEA Level 3 Classical Studies (90513) 2012 — page 15 of 16 

Question Two 

Achievement 

Achievement with Merit 

Achievement with Excellence 

Examples of supporting evidence that lack specific 

detail might be:

 

The role played by women in Roman religion – Vestal 



Virgins. 

The goddess of the hearth Vesta was represented by 

an eternal flame, which in the home was traditionally 

tended by a daughter of the household. The Temple 

of Vesta in the Forum and its flame represented the 

continuity of the community. The sacred flame was 

traditionally tended by women of the community as 

priestesses of Vesta. Six girls between the ages of 6 

and 10 were chosen from leading families to serve as 

Vestal Virgins for a period of 30 years. They had to 

maintain a vow of chastity. While the lives of Vestals 

were severely regulated they were in fact some of the 

most liberated women in Rome, with many special 

privileges. 

 

Although all points might not be this well developed, an 



example of supporting evidence that is specific and 

detailed might be:

 

The role played by women in Roman religion – Vestal 

Virgins. 

The goddess of the hearth Vesta was represented by 

an eternal flame, which in the home was traditionally 

tended by a daughter of the household. It represented 

continuity of the family and its extinction was a serious 

matter. The Temple of Vesta in the Forum and its 

external flame represented the continuity of the 

community. The sacred flame was traditionally tended 

by women of the community as priestesses of Vesta. 

Six girls between the ages of 6 and 10 were chosen 

from leading families to serve as Vestal Virgins for a 

period of 30 years. They had to maintain a vow of 

chastity, for virginity did not necessarily mean sterility to 

the Romans; it seems to have been viewed instead as 

stored up fertility. The primary importance of 

maintaining the hearth and its fire was demonstrated 

after the Battle of Cannae when Hannibal inflicted one 

of the worst defeats on ancient Rome in its history. As 

Livy reported, the Vestals came under suspicion of 

misconduct contributing to the disaster. While the lives 

of Vestals were severely regulated they were in fact 

some of the most emancipated women in Rome. They 

were free of the power of their paterfamilias and while 

they could not inherit from their family (technically no 

longer one of them), a Vestal had the right to make a 

will. Vestals were also the only women who were 

allowed the right to drive a two-wheeled carriage 

through the streets and were proceeded by a lictor to 

clear the way before them. They were also provided 

with reserved seats on the Imperial podium at games, 

close to the action, while other Roman women were 

restricted to the top tiers.

 

An example of in-depth discussion of a part of the 



question might include:

 

The role played by women in Roman religion – 

Vestal Virgins. 

•  Vesta was worshipped in the home and in the 

Forum, linking in a unique way public and private 

religion: her sacred flame represented the 

continuity of both community and family. 

•  The ritual programme of Vesta’s priestesses is 

better known than other priesthoods – reflecting 

the cult’s importance and very early origin.  

•  Six Vestal Virgins had the critical role of serving 

the goddess over 30 years. They began service at 

10, were of aristocratic birth and lived in the House 

of the Vestals. 

•  Severe punishments were imposed for letting the 

flame out (whipping) and loss of virginity (buried 

alive). 

•  Vestals prepared mola salsa, collected holy water 

and took part in the goddess’ ceremonies / 

festivals.  

•  Although an honour, at various times there were 

difficulties in attracting candidates as Vestals. 

•  Despite strict regulations associated with service, 

a number of privileges were also granted, not 

shared by other Roman women.  

 

Other points may be made. The analytical quality of 



the argument is more important than the number of 

reasons listed.

 

 


NCEA Level 3 Classical Studies (90513) 2012 — page 16 of 16 

Question Three 

Achievement 

Achievement with Merit 

Achievement with Excellence 

Examples of supporting evidence that lack 

specific detail might be:

 

How the Roman state reacted to Christianity 



and to Judaism under the Empire. 

Eg, Judaism 

The Romans were generally tolerant of foreign 

religions and tended to accept the gods of the 

peoples they ruled over. However, a 

monotheistic religion like Judaism could not 

accommodate Roman religious practice 

because it allowed the worship of only one 

god and it had a very strict moral code. 

Followers of the traditional gods thought that 

refusing to honour Jupiter or the Emperor 

threatened peace with the gods and that 

dreadful punishments might result. They also 

found the code of behaviour required by 

Judaism, for example the Sabbath, 

troublesome. However, the Roman 

government was generally prepared to leave 

the Jews alone unless they caused trouble, 

like the great revolts that ended in the 

destruction of the Temple in Jerusalem. 

 

Although all points might not be this well developed, an example 



of supporting evidence that is specific and detailed might be:

 

How the Roman state reacted to Christianity and to Judaism 



under the Empire. 

Eg, Judaism  

The Romans were generally tolerant of foreign religions and 

tended to accept the gods of the peoples they ruled over. 

However, a monotheistic religion like Judaism could not 

accommodate Roman religious practice because it allowed the 

worship of only one god and it had a very strict moral code. 

Tacitus in his Histories provides a Roman perspective on 

Judaism, recording that the Jews allowed no images or statues 

to be set up in their temples or cities. For a Roman who 

honoured the traditional gods, such conduct jeopardised pax 



deorum and threatened the well-being of the community as a 

whole. The Jewish Sabbath, religious festivals and dietary laws 

were also incompatible with Roman civic life. Jews had to be 

given special permission to assemble for worship and pay tax to 

the Temple in Jerusalem, and unlike other conquered peoples 

they could not serve in the military, as this would be against their 

religious laws. Despite these difficulties, the Roman government 

was generally prepared to tolerate Judaism, provided the Jews 

did not cause civil unrest. Judaea, their homeland, was made a 

protectorate by Pompey the Great in the 1

st

 century BCE and 



became a useful buffer against Parthian influence in the East. 

However, in 66 BCE, when the Jews rose up against their rulers, 

Roman legions, under the future Emperor, Titus, sacked 

Jerusalem, destroyed the Temple and stamped out all 

resistance.

 

An example of in-depth discussion of a part of the 



question might include:

 

How the Roman state reacted to Christianity and to 



Judaism under the Empire. 

Eg, Judaism 

•  As a monotheistic religion, Judaism was 

essentially incompatible with traditional Roman 

religion, despite the syncretic character of the 

latter.  

•  Refusal to acknowledge Roman gods and, in 

particular deified emperors, threatened pax 

deorum for followers of traditional religion.  

•  Judaism was generally tolerated, out of respect 

for its antiquity and sometimes for political 

reasons. 

•  Suppression occurred when civil order was at 

risk (eg expulsion from Rome by the emperor 

Claudius) or rebellion flared (eg in the 60s CE in 

Judaea). 

•  The Romans did not always discriminate 

between Christianity and Judaism, both 

monotheistic cults practised in the east of their 

empire.  

 

Other points may be made. The analytical quality 

of the argument is more important than the number 

of reasons listed.

 

Judgement Statement 



Achievement 

Achievement with Merit 

Achievement with Excellence 







 

Download 249.62 Kb.

Do'stlaringiz bilan baham:
1   2   3




Ma'lumotlar bazasi mualliflik huquqi bilan himoyalangan ©fayllar.org 2020
ma'muriyatiga murojaat qiling