Bdurakhmonov


Download 188.47 Kb.
Pdf ko'rish
Sana12.02.2017
Hajmi188.47 Kb.

The Role of Induced Mutation in

Conversion of Photoperiod Dependence

in Cotton

I

BROKHIM



Y. A

BDURAKHMONOV

, F

AKHRIDDIN



N. K

USHANOV


, F

AYZULLA


D

JANIQULOV

, Z

ABARDAST


T. B

URIEV


,

A

LAN



E. P

EPPER


, N

ILUFAR


F

AYZIEVA


, G

AFURJON


T. M

AVLONOV


, S

UKUMAR


S

AHA


, J

ONNIE


N. J

ENKINS


,

AND


A

BDUSATTOR

A

BDUKARIMOV



From the Laboratory of Genetic Engineering and Biotechnology, Institute of Genetics and Plant Experimental Biology, Academy of

Sciences of Uzbekistan, Yuqori Yuz, Qibray Region Tashkent District, 702151 Uzbekistan (Abdurakhmonov, Kushanov,

Djaniqulov, Buriev, Fayzieva, Mavlonov, and Abdukarimov); Department of Biology, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX

77843 (Pepper); and U.S. Department of Agriculture–Agricultural Research Service, Crop Science Research Laboratory,

Genetics and Precision Agriculture, PO Box 5367, 8120 Highway 12 East, Mississippi State, MS 39762 (Saha and Jenkins).

Address correspondence to I. Y. Abdurakhmonov at the address above, or e-mail: ibrokhim_a@yahoo.com.

Abstract

Wild cotton germplasm resources are largely underutilized because of photoperiod-dependent flowering of ‘‘exotic’’ cottons. The

objectives of this work were to explore the genome-wide effect of induced mutation in photoperiod-converted induced cotton

mutants, estimating the genetic change between mutant and wild-type cottons using simple sequence repeats (SSRs) as well as

understand the pattern of SSR mutation in induced mutagenesis. Three groups of photoperiod-converted radiomutants (

32

P)



including their wild-type parental lines, A- and D-genome diploids, and typically grown cotton cultivars were screened with 250

cotton SSR primer pairs. Forty SSRs revealed the same SSR mutation profile in, at least, 2 independent mutant lines that were

different from the original wild types. Induced mutagenesis both increased and decreased the allele sizes of SSRs in mutants with

the higher mutation rate in SSRs containing dinucleotide motifs. Genetic distance obtained based on 141 informative SSR alleles

ranged from 0.09 to 0.60 in all studied cotton genotypes. Genetic distance within all photoperiod-converted induced mutants was

in a 0.09–0.25 range. The genetic distance among photoperiod-converted mutants and their originals ranged from 0.28 to 0.50,

revealing significant modification of mutants from their original wild types. Typical Gossypium hirsutum cultivar, Namangan-77,

revealed mutational pattern similar to induced radiomutants in 40 mutated SSR loci, implying possible pressure to these SSR loci

not only in radiomutagenesis but also during common breeding process. Outcomes of the research should be useful in under-

standing the photoperiod-related mutations, and markers might help in mapping photoperiodic flowering genes in cotton.

The narrow genetic base of the primary cotton breeding gene

pool is one of the major constraints in cotton breeding pro-

grams worldwide. This underlies the necessity to enrich the

gene pool with genetic diversity. The genus Gossypium includes

45 diploid (2n 5 2x 5 26) and 5 allotetraploid (2n 5 2x 5 52)

species (Fryxell 1992; Percival et al. 1999), which contain wild

and primitive cottons (Gossypium ssp.) that possess agronom-

ically important traits, such as insect and pathogen resistance,

tolerance to environmental stresses (heat, cold, drought, and

salinity), superior fiber quality (length, strength, and lint yield),

and yield potential. These resources could, in principle, be

utilized in cotton breeding programs by mobilizing agronom-

ically important traits from wild germplasm into elite varieties.

However, the majority of these wild and primitive accessions

are photoperiod-sensitive, short-day plants that never flower

in long-day conditions of summer cultivations, making

‘‘exotic’’ cotton germplasm largely underutilized in crossing

programs. Introgression of day-neutral genes into wild cotton

germplasm or conversion of photoperiodic wild and primitive

cottons to day-neutral types is, therefore, of particular interest

for cotton breeders for effective utilization of exotic germ-

plasm in introgression of potential genetic diversity into

the breeding gene pool.

Successful photoperiodic conversion programs in cotton

have been developed to mobilize day-neutral genes into prim-

itive accessions of Gossypium hirsutum, where day-neutral genes

have been introgressed into 97 primitive cotton accessions by

a large backcrossing effort (McCarty et al. 1979; McCarty and

Jenkins 1993; Liu et al. 2000). This converted cotton germ-

plasm is an important reservoir for potential genetic diversity

Journal of Heredity 2007:98(3):258–266

doi:10.1093/jhered/esm007

Advance Access publication April 3, 2007

ª The American Genetic Association. 2007. All rights reserved.

For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oxfordjournals.org.

258


and can be used as a source to introgress genes into breeding

germplasm. However, the day-neutral versions of the other

allotetraploid cottons are not available (Liu et al. 2000).

One of the effective alternative approaches in directly

converting photoperiodic wild cotton races to day-neutral

versions is the use of induced mutation. Photoperiod-

converted induced mutant cotton germplasm has been pro-

duced in Uzbekistan by converting wild cottons directly into

day-neutral plants. More than 200 photoperiod-converted

cotton mutants germplasms have been developed (Djaniqu-

lov F, personal communication). Cottonseeds of several

photoperiodic wild and primitive cottons were treated with

c-radiation using

60

Co, b-radiation using



32

P, and low-

frequency electromagnetic field (Djaniqulov 1992, 2002).

These mutant cotton germplasm had been self-pollinated

and selected for trait of interest for M

8–10


generations. As a re-

sult, a number of commercial cotton varieties such as AN-401,

AN-402, and Kupaysin were released for the cotton farmers

that are day-neutral cultivars with superior fiber and other ag-

ronomic quality in Uzbekistan (Djaniqulov 1992; Djaniqulov

F, personal communication). Induced mutation was success-

fully used to create useful changes in several other plants, for

instance, loss of day-length sensitivity in barley (Gustafsson

and Lundquist 1976), profuse branching in sweet clover

(Scheibe and Micke 1967), change of endosperm composition

in cereals (Von Wettstein 1995), and mutation leading to semi-

dwarfism in cereals that made effective utilization of tall land-

race of rice (Maluszynski et al. 1986).

Molecular marker technologies are being used increasingly

to characterize cotton germplasm collections and breeding

populations to estimate genetic background, distance, vari-

ance, diversity, relatedness, and abundance for potential ag-

ronomic genes and to tag important traits (Wendel et al.

1992; Brubaker and Wendel 1994; Tatineni et al. 1996;

Iqbal et al. 1997; Liu 1999; Liu et al. 2000; Abdalla et al.

2001; Iqbal et al. 2001, Kohel et al. 2001; Gutierrez et al.

2002; Paterson et al. 2003). Microsatellites or simple sequence

repeats (SSRs) are considered as a marker of choice for genetic

mapping and genetic estimations of germplasm resources

(McCough et al. 1997; Mitchell et al. 1997; Estoup and Angers

1998; Liu et al. 2000; Baker 2002). Because of their abundance

and random distribution throughout the cotton genome, por-

tability, high polymorphic level, and codominant nature, SSRs

have become the system of choice for genetic diversity studies

(Cruzan 1998; Reddy et al. 2001; Driscoll et al. 2002; Zwettler

et al. 2002; Zane et al. 2002; Qureshi et al. 2004). SSRs tend to

have high mutation rates, caused by preferentially stepwise

changes in the number of repeats, and thus allele size via slip-

page and recombination (Richard and Paques 2000; Eckert

et al. 2002). Stepwise mutation model and infinite allele model

both consider changes in tandem repeat number. The size dif-

ference between 2 SSR alleles is informative in describing ge-

netic structures (Balloux and Lugon-Moulin 2002; Zhu et al.

2000; Hardy et al. 2003; Symonds and Loyd 2003). SSRs with

longer repeat numbers generate more mutated alleles than

shorter SSR loci (Weierdl et al. 1997; Symonds and Loyd

2003), and there is evidence that the nonrepeat-flanking point

and insertion/deletion mutations affect the repeat number

change of SSRs (Orti et al. 1997; Kruglyak et al. 1998;

Rolfsmeirer and Lahue 2000). A number of studies in animals

and plants have calculated the spontaneous mutation rates in

SSR loci and mutation dynamics (Schug et al. 1998; Vazquez

et al. 2000; Xu et al. 2000) that indicate a wide range of SSR muta-

tions among loci within species (Harr et al. 1998). However,

no information is available on the effect of induced mutation

on SSR mutational process in plants, particularly in cotton.

The objectives of this work were to explore the

genome-wide effect of induced mutation in photoperiod-

converted cotton mutants, estimating genetic distance be-

tween photoperiod-converted mutants and their wild-type

parental lines as well as typically grown cotton cultivars using

SSR markers, and identify the pattern of mutation and the

candidate target SSR loci in a cotton genome that possibly

might be useful in tagging the day-neutral trait in cotton. Here

we report the rapid modification of photoperiod-converted

mutant lines from their photoperiodic wild types and the ef-

fect of induced mutation in SSR loci of several independent

photoperiod-converted mutants, creating a similar pattern of

SSR mutation. These SSR loci might have potential in tagging

traits for day-neutral flowering in cotton.

Materials and Methods

Plant Material and Mutagenesis

As described in detail by Djaniqulov (1992, 2002) the induced

mutation experiments with photoperiodic cottons were con-

ducted using 2 independent irradiation approaches where dry

cottonseeds of Gossypium davidsonii var. Sonaricum, (2n 5 26),

Gossypium thurberii

(2n 5 26), G. hirsutum (2n 5 52) ssp. purpur-

ascens var. Gammara, G. hirsutum var. El Salvador, G. hirsutum

ssp. rupestre var. oligospermum and G. hirsutum ssp. glabrum

var. Marie-galante, Gossypium barbadense (2n 5 52) ssp. darwinii

var. Galapogos, and Gossypium mustelinum Miers were treated

with 1) 1, 5, 10, and 20 Gy (power of 22–33 roentgen [R/

min]) using gamma irradiation instrument—GUT (abbrevia-

tion of equipment in Russian)

60

Co at the Institute of Ge-



netics and Experimental Biology, Academy of Sciences of

Uzbekistan, Tashkent, Uzbekistan; 2) a solution of radioactive

32

P in the concentration of 30, 50, and 100 mCi during 24 h. In



both treatments, 50–100 cottonseeds were used for experi-

ments and cottonseeds with no treatment or treated with water

(in the second experiment) used as controls. Irradiation exper-

iments with the treatment of 5-Gy c-irradiation (

60

Co), and


100-lCi

32

P-irradiation found to be an optimal and effectively



converted photoperiodic lines to day-neutral mutant forms.

The most effective (about 10-fold) treatment was the second

experiment, where radioactive

32

P was used (Djaniqulov 1992,



2002; Djaniqulov F, personal communication).

Hence, we used induced cotton mutants treated with

32

P

for further molecular screening. Cottonseeds of M



7–8

gener-


ation radiomutants derived from

32

P treatment of cotton-



seeds, including their original wild-type parental lines, were

kindly provided by Dr F. Djaniqulov for molecular analyses.

These morphologically uniform M

7–8


generation cotton

mutants were obtained from self-pollination (with paper

Abdurakhmonov et al.



Molecular Analysis of Photoperiod-Converted Induced Mutants in Cotton



259

bags) in each M

1–6


generations (Djaniqulov 1992; Djaniqulov

F, personal communication). One mutant line from G. barba-

dense

ssp. darwinii, 1 mutant of G. hirsutum ssp. purpurascens



var. El Salvador, and 5 mutants of G. hirsutum ssp. glabrum

var. Marie-galante have been used for molecular screening

along with their original wild parental types. Moreover, typical

day-neutral allotetraploid (AD) cotton cultivars, G. hirsutum

var. Namangan-77 and G. barbadense var. Termes-14, as well

as 2 diploid cottons, the putative A- and D-genome ancestors

to AD cottons, Gossypium herbaceum and Gossypium raimondii,

were also included in analyses. Plant material for these typi-

cally grown cultivars and diploid cottons were obtained from

germplasm collection of the Institute of Genetics and Plants

Experimental Biology, Uzbekistan. From each mutant line

and its original wild type, 12–15 plants were grown in the field

station and greenhouse to reevaluate for their photoperiod

dependence and agronomic performance (Table 1). The

flowering time was measured from seed planting to first

bud-opening period, where photoperiod-converted mutants

produced first flowers during 55–65 days after planting,

whereas original wild parental types begin flowering very late

(up to 130 days from planting) or never produced flowers un-

til late fall. Agronomic data (Table 1) for photoperiodic wild

types were obtained from greenhouse-grown plants due to

their photoperiodic flowering in field conditions. In green-

house, photoperiodic wild types were grown under short-

day condition. Because the M

7–8

generation of studied mutant



lines were obtained from strict self-pollination (Djaniqulov

F, personal communication) of M

1–6

generations, a bulk of



young cotton leaves from these morphologically uniform

15 plants were harvested and stored at À70 °C until genomic

DNA preparations.

Molecular Analyses

Genomic DNA samples were extracted from collected cotton

tissues following the method of Dellaporta et al. (1983) with

minor modifications for frozen cotton leaf tissues. Genomic

DNAs were visualized in 0.9% agarose gel, and the con-

centration was estimated visually comparing with standard

Hin


dIII-digested phage DNA ladder concentration and di-

luted to working concentration of 25 ng/ll. One hundred

and fifty SSR markers from JESPR (Reddy et al. 2001) and

100 BAC-derived TMB (Yu et al. 2004; primer information

available through Cotton DB at http://cottondb.tamu.edu,

accessed on 12 December 2005) SSR markers were used

for genotyping analyses. Primer pairs for JESPR SSRs were

purchased from Integrated DNA Technologies (Coralville,

IA). The primer pairs for BAC-derived TMB microsatellites

were kindly provided by Dr R. Kohel and Dr J. Yu, U.S.

Department of Agriculture–Agricultural Research Service

at College Station, TX. Microsatellite genotyping analyses

were performed following overall methods of Reddy et al.

(2001). Hot-start polymerase chain reaction (PCR) steps were

performed in 50-ll volumes containing 4.5 ll of 10 PCR

buffer with MgCl

2

; 1 ll bovine serum albumin; 0.5 ll of



25 mM of a dATP, dGTP, dTTP, and dCTP mix; 2.5 ll

of 25-ng/ml of each reverse and forward primer; and 1 ll

of 25-ng/ml template DNA. Then, 0.5 U Taq DNA polymer-

ase (Sigma, St. Louis, MO; Orbigen, San Diego, CA) were

added to the reaction at the annealing temperature of first cy-

cle. Amplifications were carried out with a first denaturation

at 95 °C for 3 min followed by 45 cycles of 94 °C for 1 min,

50 °C for 1 min (annealing), and 72 °C for 2 min (extension).

A final 5-min extension at 72 °C was then performed. Poly-

morphism of microsatellite amplification products was

revealed using the agarose system where PCR products elec-

trophoresed on a 16-cm-long horizontal gel (Stratagene, La

Jolla CA) containing mix of 2% agarose and 2% metaphor

agarose at 5.3 V/cm in 0.5 (Tris-Borrate-EDTA) buffer

(45 mM Tris-borate, 1 mM ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid,

pH 8) with buffer chilling to 4 °C. Gels were stained with ethi-

duim bromide and photodocumented using Alpha Imager

3400 (Innotech Inc., San Leandro, CA).

Data Analyses

The mutant lines, original parental wild types, typical culti-

vars, and diploid cottons were genotyped, and allele sizes

were compared. Allele size ranges were estimated visually

by comparison with a standard 100-bp DNA ladder. SSR

alleles were scored as 0 for absent/recessive state, 1 for pres-

ent/dominant state, and 2 for occasional no amplification/

missing data state. Genetic distance and phylogenetic analy-

ses were performed using mean character difference option

of the Unweighted Pair Group Mean Average (UPGMA) and

Neighbor Joining (NJ) algorithms with the minimum evolu-

tion objective function (Saitou and Nei 1987) of the software

Table 1.

Some characteristics of wild and photoperiod-converted induced mutants

Cotton lines

Days from planting

to flowering

Lint


yield (%)

Cotton boll

weight (g)

Fiber


length (mm)

Gossypium barbadense

ssp. darwinii (wild parental type)

Strictly photoperiodic

29.3

1.8


19.6

Gossypium barbadense

ssp. darwinii mutant

60–65 days

42

3.6


38–42

Gossypium hirsutum

var. El Salvador (wild parental type)

125–130 days

28

1

25



Gossypium hirsutum

var. El Salvador mutant

55–60 days

36–36.5


5.7

36–38


Gossypium hirsutum

var. Marie-galante (wild parental type)

Photoperiodic

26.2


2.6

32.7


Marie-galante mtant-1

60–65 days

30

3.9


33

Marie-galante mutant-2

60–65 days

33

4.1



35

Marie-galante mutant-3

60–65 days

28

2.8



32–33

Marie-galante mutant-4

60–65 days

Lintless


2.7

Marie-galante mutant-5



60–65 days

Lintless


2.3

Journal of Heredity 2007:98(3)



260

package of PAUP*4.0b10 (Swofford 2002). The robustness

of the phylogenetic trees was evaluated in heuristic search by

10 000 bootstrapping (Felsenstein 1985) using PAUP*4.0b10

(Swofford 2002). The PAUP-generated genetic distance ma-

trix has been used for principal component analyses (PCA)

using the statistical software package Visual Statistics System

(ViSta version 5.6-EM) to better visualize the genetic distance

data (Young 1991; Young and Bann 1996).

Results and Discussion

One hundred and fifty JESPR and 100 TMB SSR primer

pairs were amplified using genomic DNAs of photoperiod-

converted induced mutants and original wild types. Twenty-

two JESPR SSRs (15%) and 18 TMB SSRs (18%) (Table 2)

were informative in describing the same SSR mutation profile

between at least 2 independent cotton mutants and their wild

types. We observed that within these 40 (16%) informative

(mutated) SSR loci, induced radioactive mutagenesis both in-

creased (57%) and decreased (43%) the allele sizes compared

with microsatellite loci size of wild types. Furthermore, within

these 40 informative microsatellite loci, mutated SSRs with di-

nucleotide motif were 57.5%, those with tri-nucleotide motif

were 40%, and those with tri/tetranuclotide repeats were 2.5%

(Table 2), indicating higher mutation frequency in SSRs

with dinucleotide motif. Although slower mutation rate of

Table 2.

Information on amplification products of SSR markers

#

SSR name


Amplification

loci number

Allele size

range (bp)

Repeat motif

Informativeness

a

Chromosomal location



Chromosome

number


Reference

1

JESPR-1



1

410–450


(GAA)

18

3



2

JESPR-30



1

100–120


(GAA)

5

A(GAA)



3

3



3

JESPR-119

1

120–130


(CA)

10

3



4

JESPR-128



2

80–100


(GT)

10

2



5

JESPR-131



2

150–160


(CT)

3

CC(CT)



7

(CA)


4

2



6

JESPR-135

3

130–150


(CT)

11

2



1, 3

Brooks (2001)

7

JESPR-136



1

150–155


(TAC)

6

3



8

JESPR-152



3

80–90;


170–180;

320–350


(GAA)

50

3



9

JESPR-156



1

80–90


(CTT)

6

CCTT



2

10



JESPR-165

1

80–100



(CTT)

10

2



11

JESPR-172



2

120–150


(GAA)

5

2



12

JESPR-179



1

150–170


(CTT)

12

3



13

JESPR-190



1

130–170


(CTT)

9

2



14

JESPR-232



1

130–150


(CT)

18

2



10

Brooks (2001)

15

JESPR-237



1

90–120


(GA)

17

3



15

Brooks (2001)

16

JESPR-243



1

180–200


(GA)

16

2



1

Brooks (2001)

17

JESPR-251



1

70–90


(CA)

15

2



3

Brooks (2001)

18

JESPR-270



1

70–90


(CA)

15

(TA)



3

2

10



Brooks (2001)

19

JESPR-295



1

100–120


(CTT)

7

2



Brooks (2001)

20

JESPR-296



1

180–190


(TCA)

8

(CTT)



13

3

5L



Brooks (2001)

21

JESPR-297



2

100; 150–220

(GAA)

12

2



16

Shen et al. (2005)

22

JESPR-300



1

200–210


(CTT)

5

(CAT)



6

2

12



Brooks (2001)

23

TMB0062



1

250–320


(CA)

10

2



24

TMB0189



2

180–220


(CA)

24

3



25

TMB201



2

205–230


(CA)

7

2



15 Sh

Guo et al. (2005)

26

TMB0313


2

180–200


(CA)

23

(TA)



5

2



27

TMB0508


2

305–400


(CA)

8

(GA)



5

2



28

TMB0853


1

250–255


(CA)

18

2



6 Sh

Guo et al. (2005)

29

TMB0865


1

200–220


(GA)

27

2



30

TMB1277



1

280–300


(CA)

6

3



6 Lo

Guo et al. (2005)

31

TMB1288


1

200–250


(CA)

40

2



32

TMB1348



1

170–180


(GAA)

7

2



14 Sh

Guo et al. (2005)

33

TMB1356


2

210–250


(GA)

13

2



34

TMB1409



1

180–200


(GAA)

11

2



35

TMB1638



1

180–190


(GAA)

8

3



18 Sh

Guo et al. (2005)

36

TMB1660


1

180–190


(GA)

17

2



H12

Guo et al. (2005)

37

TMB1688


1

290–400


(CA)

38

3



38

TMB1701



1

150–180


(GA)

2



39

TMB1998


2

250–280


(GA)

14

3



40

TMB2018



1

250–300


(GAA)

8

2



a

Informativeness indicated that a marker revealed the same mutation profile across all mutant groups (3), 2 mutant groups (2).



261

Abdurakhmonov et al.



Molecular Analysis of Photoperiod-Converted Induced Mutants in Cotton



dinucleotide repeats was reported in some studies (Webber and

Wong 1993; Eckert and Yan 2000), our results were consistent

with the findings in other organisms (Chakraborty et al. 1997;

Schung et al. 1998) that dinucleotide repeats mutate in higher

rate than microsatellites with the other repeat types. Further-

more, it is known that the mutation rate of longer microsatel-

lites is higher than shorter SSRs (Wierdl et al. 1997; Vigouroux

et al. 2002; Symonds and Loyd 2003). In our study, all infor-

mative SSRs contained at least 5 microsatellite repeat, most

(75%) having repeat numbers above 9.

To estimate genetic distance and phylogenetic change,

these 40 SSRs further were selected and used to genotype

a panel of 14 cotton lines, including 7 photoperiod-converted

induced mutants, 3 original wild types, 2 typical tetraploid cot-

ton cultivars from Uzbekistan, representing G. hirsutum and G.

barbadense

, and 2 diploid genotypes (G. herbaceum and G. raimon-

dii


). The 40 informative SSR primer pairs from JESPR and

TMB collections amplified 54 polymorphic marker loci in

14 cotton genotypes. Of these, 28 primer pairs amplified a sin-

gle marker locus each, 10 primer pairs amplified 2 marker loci

each, and 2 primer pairs amplified 3 marker loci each (Table 2).

Furthermore, 13 SSR markers revealed the same SSR muta-

tion pattern between 3 independent cotton mutants and their

wild types, and the remaining 27 SSR primer pairs revealed the

same SSR mutation pattern between 2 independent mutant

groups (Figure 1 and Table 2). These 40 informative SSR

primer pairs amplified a total of 141 different alleles with

an average of 3 SSR alleles per each marker locus in 14 cotton

genotypes.

The genetic distance obtained in these 141 different alleles

ranged from 0.09 to 0.60 in all studied cotton genotypes

(Table 3). The highest genetic distance was observed between

G. raimondii

and G. herbaceum (GD 5 0.60) and between

G. herbaceum

and photoperiod-converted induced mutants

of G. hirsutum var. Marie-galante mutant-5 (GD 5 0.57),

whereas the lowest genetic distance (GD 5 0.09) was found

between mutants of Marie-galante. The genetic distance among

photoperiod-converted mutants and their originals ranged

from 0.28 to 0.50. The genetic distance between G. barbadense

ssp. darwinii and its photoperiodic converted induced mutant

was 0.50, indicating that significant genetic change resulted

from radioactive mutagenesis. Similarly, the genetic distance

between El Salvador and its mutant was also significant (GD 5

0.28), demonstrating a 28% change around the genotyped

regions. The genetic distance of G. hirsutum var. Marie-galante

Table 3.


SSR-based genetic distance matrix generated using PAUP phylogenetic software

Types


1

2

3



4

5

6



7

8

9



10

11

12



13

14

1. Gossypium raimondii



2. Gossypium herbaceum

0.60



3. Gossypium barbadense var. Termez-14



0.52

0.53


4. Gossypium barbadense ssp. darwinii wild

0.57

0.55


0.19

5. Gossypium barbadense ssp. darwinii mutant



0.50

0.52


0.47

0.50


6. Gossypium hirsutum var. Namangan-77

0.49

0.51


0.48

0.51


0.15

7. Gossypium hirsutum El Salvador (wild)



0.50

0.52


0.52

0.49


0.31

0.22


8. Gossypium hirsutum El Salvador mutant

0.50

0.54


0.48

0.52


0.11

0.10


0.29

9. Gossypium hirsutum Marie-galante wild



0.51

0.56


0.45

0.42


0.38

0.36


0.21

0.42


10. Marie-galante mutant-1

0.49

0.52


0.42

0.51


0.21

0.20


0.29

0.14


0.40

11. Marie-galante mutant-2



0.55

0.52


0.40

0.48


0.21

0.20


0.29

0.17


0.45

0.10


12. Marie-galante mutant-3

0.52

0.56


0.40

0.48


0.20

0.28


0.37

0.18


0.47

0.18


0.11

13. Marie-galante mutant-4



0.55

0.52


0.38

0.47


0.25

0.27


0.36

0.24


0.49

0.14


0.11

0.13


14. Marie-galante mutant-5

0.55

0.57


0.43

0.48


0.21

0.23


0.29

0.20


0.46

0.17


0.09

0.13


0.13

Figure 1.



The example of 4% mixed metaphor agarose gel

showing SSR polymorphism profile in 14 cotton genotype

panels. (A) The same mutational change in 3 independent

cotton mutants (JESPR-237); (B) the same mutational change

in 2 independent cotton mutants (TMB0062). Numbers 1–14

represent the panel of cotton genotypes described in Table 3.

262

Journal of Heredity 2007:98(3)



and its photoperiod-converted mutants ranged from 0.40 to

0.49, demonstrating the occurrence of significant change

from original version. Interestingly, genetic distance between

photoperiod-converted induced mutants was in the 0.09–0.25

range, showing 75–91% similarities between these 3 inde-

pendent mutant groups in the studied SSR loci (Table 3).

We addressed the following question: have these informa-

tive JESPR loci been changed during the variety development

process? To estimate genetic distance between mutants and

breeding material and determine the state of these informative

loci in typically grown tetraploid cottons, we have screened 2

tetraploid cotton varieties of Uzbekistan, G. hirsutum var.

Namangan-77 and G. barbadense var. Termez-14 with these in-

formative SSR primer pairs. The results revealed that genetic

distance between the G. hirsutum standard variety Namangan-

77 and the photoperiod-converted mutants ranged from 0.10

to 0.28, demonstrating high genetic similarity between

mutants and a typical cotton variety. Very high genetic sim-

ilarity (90% allele sharing, GD 5 0.10) was observed between

Namangan-77 and the photoperiod-converted mutant of

G. hirsutum

var. El Salvador, whereas the highest genetic distance

(GD 5 0.28) observed between Namangan-77 and Marie-

galante mutant-3 (Table 3). These findings clearly demonstrated

that 1) these 40 informative SSR loci could have been subjected

to a selection in the development of Namangan-77 cultivar or

2) some mutation process has been applied during the develop-

ment of Namangan-77, a day-neutral cotton cultivar. In con-

trast to this finding, the large genetic distance was observed

(GD 5 0.38–0.47) between Termez-14 (a day-neutral commer-

cialized cultivar belonging to G. barbadense) and photoperiod-

converted mutants, favoring the second scenario in the

development of Namangan-77 cotton cultivar of G. hirsutum.

However, there was no indication on application of mutagenesis

approach in the development of Namangan-77, and this cultivar

was derived from complex hybridization between G. hirsutum

ssp. punctatum (a wild race) and G. hirsutum var. 159-F (a culti-

var). The superior fiber quality line, L-870, was selected from

above cross, and it was consequently crossed with G. hirsutum

cultivar ‘‘2034’’, and Namangan-77, an early maturing cultivar

with superior fiber quality, was selected from the progenies

of this cross (Abdullaev A, Uzbek cotton germplasm collection

curator, personal communication). Hence, the high genetic

similarity found between Namangan-77 and photoperiod-

converted mutants could be specific for the particular breed-

ing approach (complex hybridization and multiple selections)

and breeding environment of Namangan-77.

The UPGMA and NJ trees (Figures 2 and 3) demonstrated

a phylogenetic relationship between the cotton genotypes

Figure 2.

The phylogenetic UPGMA tree generated by PAUP software. Numbers represent the bootstrap values obtained from

10 000 time bootstrapping.

263

Abdurakhmonov et al.





Molecular Analysis of Photoperiod-Converted Induced Mutants in Cotton



studied. According to results, all mutant genotypes clustered

together with a typical G. hirsutum variety of Namangan-77,

branching from primitive G. hirsutum representatives, El

Salvador and Marie-galante. As expected, G. barbadense ssp.

darwinii and Termez-14 cluster together and diploid cottons

cluster together (Figure 2). Furthermore, the PCA based on

genetic distance matrix was used to better visualize the genetic

structure of the studied cotton genotypes. The first 2 eigen

vectors estimated for 76% of variation observed. PCA biplot

(Figure 4) placed all photoperiod-converted induced mutants

in one cluster, separating the original wild versions and diploid

cottons from each other. PCA biplot placed Namangan-77,

the day-neutral cultivar, close to mutant cottons lines.

The results of the PCA once more demonstrated that induced

mutation significantly affected the targeted lines and, more

interestingly, caused similar mutational patterns within the

SSR loci, making the 3 independent induced cotton mu-

tants (El Salvador, Marie-galante, and ssp. darwinii) geneti-

cally similar.

A narrow genetic base in cotton breeding germplasm

(Multani and Lyon 1995; Iqbal et al. 1997; Bowman et al.

2000; Gutierrez et al. 2002) and Gossypium species (Iqbal

et al. 2001; Abdalla et al. 2001) has been reported in cotton.

Moreover, Liu et al. (2000) studied genetic diversity of

photoperiod-converted primitive G. hirsutum race stocks using

SSR markers and found high genetic similarities .0.85 be-

tween photoperiod-converted material and G. hirsutum stan-

dard TM-1. In this study, the genetic distance among

photoperiod-converted mutants and their originals ranged

from 0.28 to 0.50. This demonstrated that a 28% change

(at least) occurred in the genotyped regions, revealing the sig-

nificance of radiomutagenesis in modification of mutants

from their wild types. The results demonstrated that irradia-

tion mutagenesis had an effect on sizes of studied SSR loci.

This could be due to the constraints of radioactive mutagen-

esis on observed allele sizes that caused genetic distance to

plateau (Nauta and Weissing 1996; Paetkau et al. 1997). Ob-

served patterns at SSR loci could also be due to homoplasy

mutations (Jarne and Lagoda 1996; Estoup et al. 2002), and

we did not address this in our study that underlies genotyping

of large numbers of mutant and wild-type individuals and se-

quence candidate homoplasy alleles to determine the flanking

mutations (SNPs and insertion/deletions). Additional studies

are needed to determine the homoplasy features in these

informative cotton SSRs that were affected by induced

mutation.

All induced mutants significantly changed from original

wild types and became day neutral with mostly improved ag-

ronomic quality. According to Djaniqulov (2002), induced

mutagenesis not only changed photoperiodic dependence

of wild species but also improved fiber quality and other agro-

nomic performance, for instance, in mutants of G. barbadense

ssp. darwinii the fiber length was increased from 19.6 to 38–42

mm, lint yield was increased from 29.3% to 42%, and maturing

occurred early compared with the original photoperiodic wild

types (Table 1). However, it should be noted that change in fiber

quality in mutants could also be due to mutation of fiber-

related loci as radiomutagenesis widely affects the genome. This

directly photoperiod-converted genetically diverse cotton

germplasm forms a reservoir of novel quantitative trait loci

(QTLs) that can be used in breeding programs.

Furthermore, the molecular basis of photoperiodic

dependence has not been determined, and genes for

Figure 3.

The phylogenetic unrooted NJ tree. Branch length

is shown. Numbers 1–14 represent the panel of cotton

genotypes described in Table 3.

Figure 4.

Biplot derived from the PCAs of genetic distance

matrix. Numbers 1–14 represent the panel of cotton genotypes

described in Table 3.

264


Journal of Heredity 2007:98(3)

photoperiodic flowering have not been mapped in cotton (Liu

et al. 2000; Abdurakhmonov 2001). At least, the subset of 13

informative SSR markers that revealed the same SSR mutation

profile in 3 independent mutants can be useful in mapping

genes associated with photoperiodic conversion in cotton.

Some of these SSRs have already been assigned to chromo-

somes (Table 2), suggesting important target chromosomes

for future studies. In perspective, to determine the genetic as-

sociation of these markers, segregating F

2

populations derived



from the cross of mutant and original genotypes have been

created, and molecular tagging of QTLs associated with pho-

toperiodic conversion using mutated SSR loci is in progress.

The results of this study should be useful in understanding the

photoperiod-related induced mutations and the mutagenesis

effect in creating a diverse cotton germplasm. Informative

SSR markers reported herein might have a potential in map-

ping of photoperiodic flowering genes in cotton using specific

experimental populations.

Acknowledgments

This work was supported in part by a research grant on cotton marker–

assisted selection by the Science and Technology Center of Uzbekistan.

We are grateful to the Agricultural Research Service–Former Soviet Union;

Scientific Cooperation Program, Office of International Research Programs,

U.S. Department of Agriculture–Agricultural Research Service (USDA-ARS),

for financial support of cotton genomics research in Uzbekistan. We thank

Dr Russell Kohel and John Yu, USDA-ARS, College Station, TX, for providing

BAC-derived SSR markers. We thank Dr Pierre J. Lagoda, International

Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna, Austria, for useful suggestions in manuscript

preparation. Mention of trademark or proprietary product does not constitute

a guarantee or warranty of the product by the USDA and does not imply its

approval to the exclusion of other products that may also be suitable.

References

Abdalla AM, Reddy OUK, El-Zik KM, Pepper AE. 2001. Genetic diversity

and relationships of diploid and tetraploid cottons revealed using AFLP.

Theor Appl Genet. 102:222–229.

Abdurakhmonov IY. 2001. Molecular cloning and characterization of geno-

mic sequence tags (GSTS) from the PHYA, PHYB and HY5 gene families of

cotton (Gossypium species) [MS thesis]. College Station (TX): Texas A&M

University.

Baker GC. 2002. Microsatellite DNA: a tool for population genetic analysis.

Trans R Soc Trop Med Hyg. 96:S21–S24.

Balloux F, Lugon-Moulin N. 2002. The estimation of population differen-

tiation with microsatellite markers. Mol Ecol. 11:155–165.

Bowman DT. 2000. Attributes of public and private cotton breeding pro-

grams. J Cotton Sci. 4:130–136.

Brooks TD. 2001. Mapping of cotton fiber length and strength quantitative

trait loci using microsatellites [PhD dissertation]. College Station (TX): Texas

A&M University.

Brubaker CL, Wendel JF. 1994. Reevaluating the origin of domesticated cot-

ton (Gossypium hirsutum) nuclear restriction fragment length polymorphisms

(RFLPs). Am J Bot. 81:1309–1326.

Chakraborty R, Kimmel M, Stivers DN, Davison LJ, Deka R. 1997. Relative

mutation rates at di-, tri-, and tetranucleotide microsatellite loci. Proc Natl

Acad Sci USA. 94:1041–1046.

Cruzan M. 1998. Genetic markers in plant evolutionary ecology. Ecology

79:400–412.

Dellaporta SL, Wood J, Hicks JP. 1983. A plant DNA minipreparation: ver-

sion II. Plant Mol Biol Rep. 1:19–21.

Djaniqulov F. 1992. Radioactive mutagenesis of wild cotton species and its

utilization in breeding [Doctor of Science dissertation]. Tashkent (Uzbeki-

stan): Institute of Experimantal Biology, Academy of Sciences of Uzbekistan.

Russian.

Djaniqulov F. 2002. About relation between radio-sensitivity and mutability

of wild and tropical cultivated cotton forms. Proc Russ Acad Agric Sci. 2:19–

22. Russian.

Driscoll CA, Menotti-Raymond M, Nelson G, Goldstein D, O’Brien SJ.

2002. Genomic microsatellites evolutionary chronometers: a test in wild cats.

Genome Res. 12:414–423.

Eckert KA, Mowery A, Hile SE. 2002. Misalignment mediated DNA poly-

merase beta mutations: comparison of microsatellite and frame-shift error

rates using a forward mutation assay. Biochemistry. 41:10490–10498.

Eckert KA, Yan G. 2000. Mutational analyses of di-nucleotide and tetra-

nucleotide microsatellites in Escherichia coli: influence of sequence on expan-

sion mutagenesis. Nucleic Acid Res. 28:2831–2838.

Estoup A, Angers B. 1998. Microsatellites and minisatellites for molecular

ecology: theoretical and empirical considerations. In: Carvalho GR, editor.

Advances in molecular ecology. Nato Sciences Series. Amsterdam: IOS

Press. p. 55–86.

Estoup A, Jarne P, Cornuet JM. 2002. Homoplasy and mutation model at

microsatellite loci and their consequence for population genetics analysis.

Mol Ecol. 11:1591–1604.

Felsenstein J. 1985. Confidence limits on phylogenies: an approach using the

bootstrap. Evolution. 39:783–791.

Fryxell PA. 1992. A revised taxonomic interpretation of Gossypium L (Mal-

vaceae). Rheedea. 2:108–165.

Guo Y, Saha S, Yu J, Jenkins JN, Kohel RJ, Stelly DM. 2005. Chromosomal

assignment of BAC-derived SSR markers in cotton (Gossypium hirsutum

L.). The proceedings of Cotton Beltwide Conference. New Orleans (LA):

The National Cotton Council of America. p. 1067

Gustafsson A, Lundquist U. 1976. Controlled environment and short day

tolerance in barley mutants. In: Induced mutations in cross breeding. Vienna

(Austria): IAEA. p. 49–52.

Gutierrez OA, Basu S, Saha S, Jenkins JN, Shoemaker DB, Chetham CL,

McCarty JC Jr. 2002. Genetic distance among selected cotton genotypes

and its relationship with F

2

performance. Crop Sci. 42:1841–1847.



Hardy OJ, Charbonnel N, Freville H, Heuertz M. 2003. Microsatellite allele

sizes: a simple test to assess their significance on genetic differentiation. Ge-

netics. 163:1467–1482.

Harr B, Zangerl B, Brem G, Schlotterer C. 1998. Conservation of locus spe-

cific microsatellite variability across species: a comparison of two drosophila

sibling species, D. melanogaster and D. simulans. Mol Biol Evol. 15:176–184.

Iqbal MJ, Aziz N, Saeed NA, Zafar Y, Malik KA. 1997. Genetic diversity

evaluation of some elite cotton varieties by RAPD-analysis. Theor Appl

Genet. 94:139–144.

Iqbal MJ, Reddy OUK, El-Zik KM, Pepper AE. 2001. A genetic bottleneck

in the evolution under domestication of upland cotton Gossypium hirsutum L.

examined using DNA fingerprinting. Theor Appl Genet. 103:547–554.

Jarne P, Lagoda PJL. 1996. Microsatellites, from molecules to populations

and back. Trends Evol Ecol. 11:424–429.

Kohel RJ, Yu JZ, Park YH, Lazo GR. 2001. Molecular mapping and char-

acterization of genes controlling fiber quality in cotton. Euphytica. 121:163–

172.

Kruglyak S, Durrett RT, Schug MD, Aquadro CF. 1998. Equilibrium



distributions of microsatellite repeat length resulting from a balance between

265


Abdurakhmonov et al.



Molecular Analysis of Photoperiod-Converted Induced Mutants in Cotton



slippage events and point mutations. Proc Natl Acad Sci USA. 95:10774–

10778.


Liu S. 1999. Cotton genetic mapping and QTL analysis using simple se-

quence repeat markers and the identification of their chromosome location

[MS thesis]. Las Cruces (NM): New Mexico State University.

Liu S, Cantrell RG, McCarty JC Jr, Stewart JMcD. 2000. Simple sequence

repeat-based assessment of genetic diversity in cotton race stock accessions.

Crop Sci. 40:1459–1469.

Maluszynski M, Micke A, Donini B. 1986. Genes for semidwarfism in rice

induced by mutagenesis. In: Rice genetics. Manila (Philippines): IRRI. p.

729–737.

McCarty JC Jr, Jenkins JN. 1993. Registration of 79 day-neutral primitive

cotton germplasm lines. Crop Sci. 33:351.

McCarty JC Jr, Jenkins JN, Parrott WL, Greech RG. 1979. The conversion of

photoperiodic primitive race stocks of cotton to day-neutral stocks. Miss

Agric For Exp Stn Res Rep. 4(19):1–4.

McCough SR, Chen X, Panaud O, Temnykh S, Xu Y, Cho YG, Huang N,

Ishii T, Blair M. 1997. Microsatellite marker development, mapping and

applications in rice genetics and breeding. Plant Mol Biol. 35:89–99.

Mitchell SE, Kresovich S, Jester CA, Hernandez CJ, Szewe-Mcfadden AK.

1997. Application of multiplex PCR and fluorescence-based, semi-auto-

mated allele sizing technology for genotyping plant genetic resources. Crop

Sci. 37:617–624.

Multani DS, Lyon BR. 1995. Genetic fingerprinting of Australian cotton cul-

tivars with RAPD markers. Genome. 38:1005–1008.

Nauta MJ, Weissing FJ. 1996. Constraints on allele size at microsatellite loci:

implication for genetic differentiation. Genetics. 143:1021–1032.

Orti G, Pearce DE, Avise JC. 1997. Phylogenetic assessment of length var-

iation at a microsatellite locus. Proc Natl Acad Sci USA. 94:10745–10749.

Paetkau D, Waits LP, Clarkson PL, Craighead L, Strobeck C. 1997. An em-

pirical evaluation of genetic distance statistics using microsatellite data from

bear (Ursidae) populations. Genetics. 147:1943–1957.

Paterson AH, Saranga Y, Menz M, Ziang CX. 2003. QTL analysis of geno-

type Â environment interactions affecting cotton fiber quality. Theor Appl

Genet. 106:384–396.

Percival AE, Stewart JM, Wendel JF. 1999. Taxonomy and germplasm

resources. In: Smith CW, Cothren JT, editors. Cotton: origin, history, tech-

nology and production. New York: John Wiley. p. 33–63.

Qureshi SN, Saha S, Kantety RV, Jenkins JN. 2004. EST-SSR: a new class of

genetic markers in cotton. J Cotton Sci. 8:112–123.

Reddy OUK, Pepper AE, Abdurakhmonov I, Saha S, Jenkins JN, Brooks

TD, Bolek Y, El-Zik KM. 2001. The identification of dinucleotide and tri-

nucleotide microsatellite repeat loci from cotton G. hirsutum L. J Cotton Sci.

5:103–113.

Richard GF, Paques F. 2000. Mini- and microsatellite expansions: the recom-

bination connection. EMBO Rep. 1:122–126.

Rolfsmeier ML, Lahue R S. 2000. Stabilizing effects of interruptions on tri-

nucleotide repeat expansions in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Mol Cell Biol. 20:173–180.

Saitou M, Nei N. 1987. The neighbor joining method: a new method for

reconstructing phylogenetic trees. Mol Biol Evol. 4:406–425.

Scheibe A, Micke A. 1967. Experimentally induced mutations in leguminous

forage plants and their agronomic value. In: Induced mutations and their

utilization. Proc. Erwin-Baur-Geda¨chtnisvorlesungen IV, Gatersleben

1966. Gatersleben (Germany): Akademie-Verlag Berlin. p. 231–236.

Schug MD, Wetterstrand KA, Gaudette MS, Lim RH, Hutter CM, Aquadro

CF. 1998. The distribution and frequency of microsatellite loci in Drosophila

melanogaster.

Mol Ecol. 7:57–70.

Shen X, Guo W, Zhu X, Yuan Y, Yu JZ, Kohel RJ, Zhang T. 2005. Molecular

mapping of QTLs for fiber qualities in three diverse lines in Upland cotton

using SSR markers. Molecular Breeding. 15:169–181.

Swofford DL. 2002. Phylogenetic analysis using parsimony (*and other

methods). Sunderland (MA): Sinauer.

Symonds VV, Lloyd AM. 2003. An analysis of microsatellite loci in Arabi-

dopsis thaliana: mutational dynamics and application. Genetics. 165:1475–

1488.


Tatineni V, Canterell RG, Davis DD. 1996. Genetic diversity in elite cotton

germplasm determined by morphological characteristics and RAPDs. Crop

Sci. 36:186–192.

Vazquez F, Perez T, Albornoz J, Dominguez A. 2000. Estimation of the

mutation rates in Drosophila melanogaster. Genet Res. 76:323–326.

Vigouroux Y, Jaqueth JS, Matsuoka Y, Smith OS, Beavis WD, Smith SC,

Doebley J. 2002. Rate and pattern of mutation at microsatellite loci in maize.

Mol Biol Evol. 19(8):1251–1260.

Von Wettstein D. 1995. Breeding of value added barley by mutation and

protein engineering. In: Induced mutations and molecular techniques for

crop improvement. Proceedings of FAO/IAEA Symposium, Vienna

1995. Vienna (Austria): IAEA. p. 67–76.

Webber JL, Wong C. 1993. Mutation of human short tandem repeats. Hum

Mol Genet. 7:524–530.

Wendel JF, Brubaker CL, Percival AE. 1992. Genetic diversity in Gossypium

hirsutum


and the origin of upland cotton. Am J Bot. 79:1291–1310.

Wierdl M, Dominska M, Petes TD. 1997. Microsatellite instability in

yeast: dependence on the length of the microsatellite. Genetics. 146:769–779.

Xu X, Peng M, Fang Z, Xu X. 2000. The direction of microsatellite mutations

is dependent upon the allele length. Nat Genet. 24:396–399.

Young FW. 1991. Comments on Lisp Stat. Stat Sci. 6:349–352.

Young FW, Bann CM. 1996. ViSta: a visual statistics system. In: Stine R, Fox

J, editors. Statistical computing environments for social research. California

(CA): Sage Publications. p. 207–23.

Yu JZ, Kohel RJ, Cantrell RG, Jones D, Saha S, Tomkins J, Main D, Palmer

M, Pepper AE, Stelly DM, et al. 2004. Establishment of standardized cotton

microsatellite database (CMD) panel. The proceedings of Cotton Beltwide

Conference. San Antonio (TX): The National Cotton Council of America.

p. 1129.


Zane L, Bargelloni L, Patarnello T. 2002. Strategies for microsatellite isola-

tion: a review. Mol Ecol. 11:1–16.

Zhu YJ, Strassmann E, Queller DC. 2000. Insertions, substitutions, and the

origin of microsatellites. Genet Res. 76:227–236.

Zwettler D, Vieira CP, Scholotterer C. 2002. Polymorphic microsatellites in

Antirrhinum (Scrophulariaceae), a genus with low levels of nuclear sequence

variability. J Hered. 93:217–221.

Received December 21, 2005

Accepted November 13, 2006

Corresponding Editor: J. Perry Gustafson



266

Journal of Heredity 2007:98(3)




Download 188.47 Kb.

Do'stlaringiz bilan baham:




Ma'lumotlar bazasi mualliflik huquqi bilan himoyalangan ©fayllar.org 2020
ma'muriyatiga murojaat qiling