Chem 28 – analytical chemistry


Download 383.93 Kb.
Pdf ko'rish
bet1/4
Sana22.09.2020
Hajmi383.93 Kb.
  1   2   3   4

 

CHEM 28 – ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY 

Analytical Chemistry – involves separating, identifying, and 

determining amount(s) of component(s) in a sample 



Sample – material of interest to be analyzed 

Analyte – substance being determined in a sample 

Titrant – standard solution of known concentration 

2 Areas of Analytical Chemistry: 

1.  Qualitative Analysis – identification of substance 

2.  Quantitative Analysis - measurement of amount of a 

particular substance in the sample 



Classification of Quantitative Analysis: 

A.  Based on the type of Analytical Method 

a.  Classical (Stoichiometric) Methods – “Wet 

Analysis” 

1.  Gravimetric – amount of analyte determined from 

amount formed  

2.  Volumetric (Titrimetric) – amount of analyte 

determined from measured volume of titrant  

4 Types of Volumetric Analysis: 

1.  Acid-Base Titration 

2.  Precipitation Titration 

3.  Complexometric Titration 

4.  Redox Titration 

b.  Instrumental (Non-Stoichiometric or 



Physiochemical) Methods – “Modern Analysis” – 

some measurable physical property is taken as a 

measure of amount of analyte that requires calibration 

curve/plot 

1.  Spectrophotometry -  applies Beer’s Law 

2.  Electrochemical – applies Ohm’s Law and 

Potenciometry 

3.  Chromatographic Method – Gas Chromatograph, 

High Performance Liquid Chromatograph, 

Chromatogram 

B.  According to amount of sample analyzed – based upon 

size of sample taken for analysis 

a.  Macro Analysis – sample weighs 0.1g or more 

b.  Semi-Micro Analysis – sample weighs between 10 and 

100mg 

c.  Micro Analysis – sample weighs between 1 and 10 mg 



d.  Ultramicro Analysis – sample weighs on the order of 

ìg 


e.  Submicro Analysis – sample weighs less than 0.1

ìg or 


less 

C.  According to relative amount of analyte – based on 

amount of analyte in relation to sample 

a.  Major Constituent – analyte > 1% of the sample 

b.  Minor Constituent – analyte ammounts to 0.01% - 1% 

of the sample 

c.  Trace Constituent – analyte < 0.01% of the sample 

D.  According to Extent of Desired Analysis -  based on 

number and type of constituents determined and reported 

a.  Complete/Ultimate Analysis – amount of each 

component determined; amounts for each constituent 

present in the sample and should represent 100% of the 

sample 

b.  Single Component/Partial Analysis – most common; not 



all constituents determined 

c.  Proximate Analysis – amount of certain selected 

constituents in a sample is determined; similar 

components are determined and grouped together 

d.  Kjeldall Analysis – for proteins, crude fat and crude fiber 

analysis using ammonia and HCl and back titration to get 

the % protein 

Steps in a Quantitative Analysis: 

1.  Selecting a method 

2.  Sampling 

3.  Sampling Processing/Preparation 

4.  Eliminating Interferences 

a.  Interferences – species other than analyte that 

affects the final measurement 

b.  Masking – conversion of interferences into forms 

not detected by the analytical method through the 

addition of a reagent that reacts with the potential 

interference 

c.  Solvent Extraction – involves an organic phase 

and a liquid phase; related to liquid-liquid extraction 

which involves the removal of salt and purification 

d.  Chemical Derivation – involves the conversion of 

the analyte to desired form and its extraction 

5.  Measuring Property of Analyte 

6.  Calculation and Interpretation of Results 



Factors to be considered in Defining the Analytical 

Method: 

1.  Nature of Analysis – elemental or molecular; repetitive or 

intermittent (number of samples to be analyzed); 

destructive or non-destructive; sensitivity of method 

2.  Restrictions due to physical and chemical properties of 

species of interest – e.g. radioactive, corrosive, volatile + 

sample stability 

3.  Potential Interference – arise from similar physical or 

chemical properties of other species in the sample;  

a.  for separation steps – choose selective method 

b.  LOD – minimum concentration of analyte that can 

be detected by the method 

c.  Sensitivity of method – measures the ability of 

method to discriminate between small differences 

in analyte concentration 

4.  Concentration range of species to be studied 

5.  Time available for determinations – important in 

manufacturing industry due to some analysis easy in 

practice but some require hours of tedious attention 

6.  Analytical facilities available and availability of equipment 

a.  Accuracy desired (reliability of analysis) 

b.  Cost of analysis – equipment + reagents + analyst 

time 

Main Steps in Chemical Analysis: 

1.  Sampling – selecting a representative sample of 

material to be analyzed; may be manual or continuous 

2.  Sample Preparation 



a.  Preparation of lab sample for analysis, measure mass 

or volume of sample and dissolve sample in 

approximate solvents using highly purified chemicals 

available (more expensive) – analytical reagent grade 

chemicals + deionized and distilled or triple distilled or 

ultrapure H

2



b.  In many analysis, a small amount of impurity can 



have serious effects on the experiment  

c.  Have to consider also stability of solutions (analytical 

reagent solution and sample) may decompose 

3.  Isolation of Analyte  

a.  sample treatment (conversion of analyte to 

measurable form) 

b.  interfering substances removed in this step or 

converted to noninterfering forms or remove analyte 

from rest of sample 

c.  do analytical separations such as precipitation, 

electrolysis, solvent extraction, ion exchange and 

chromatography 

4.  Determination Step (Measurement)  

a.  Utilize appropriate analytical method for routine 

analysis - usually instrumental methods  

b.  To have confidence in analytical procedure – can 

method using reference standards (samples similar in 

composition to unknown sample and with precisely 

known content of constituent to be determined) e.g. 

highly reliable standard materials usually used for 

instrumental methods 

c.  Standards treated in the same way as unknown – 

special standard is ideally zero result 

d.  Blank – simulated unknown that contains none of the 

analyte being determined; gives a check on reagents 

used in analytical procedure 

5.  Calculation and Interpretation of Result 

a.  Make blank corrections using the blanks 



Lot – total material from which samples are taken 

Bulk/ Gross Sample – material taken from the lot for analysis 

for archiving (study for future references)   



Aliquot – small test portions of lab samples used for individual 

analysis 

 

Random Sampling – for highly segregated materials (with 

different regions for different compositions) get representative 

composite sample 

Sample Preparation – reduction of sample particle size by 

crushing and grinding, then screening/sieving to desired 

Analytical Subsample – Extract/Digestate – Analysis – Result – 

Field Subsample – Field Sample – extrapolation of analytical 

result back to decision unit – Decision Unit 

MOISTURE IN SAMPLES 

A.  Forms of Water in Solids 

1.  Essential Water – water that is an integral part of a 

solid chemical compound; exists in stoichiometric 

amount 


a.  Water of Crystallization – in stable solid hydrate 

e.g. CaC


2

O

4



⋅2H

2

O; BaCl



2

⋅H

2



b.  Water of Constitution – water formed when 

pure solid is decomposed by heat or other 

chemical treatment e.g. Ca(OH)

2(s)

 

Ä→ CaO



(s)

 + 


H

2

O



(g)

 and 2KHSO

4(s)

 

Ä→ K



2

S

2



O

7(s)


 + H

2

O



(g)

 

2.  Nonessential Water – water that is physically 



retained as a solid; does not occur in 

stoichiometric amount 

a.  Adsorbed Water – water retained on the surface 

of solids  

b.  Sorbed Water – held as condensed phase in 

interstices or capillaries of colloidal solid like 

starch, protein, charcoal and silica gel; often in 

large amount 

c.  Occluded Water – entrapped in microscopic 

pockets spaced irregular throughout solid 

crystals; in rocks and minerals 

Moisture Determination: 

1.  Oven Drying 

a.  Simplest procedure 

b.  Drying at 105

°C – remove bulk H

2



c.  Drying at 180

°C – remove almost all occluded H

2



and water of crystallization 



d.  Sample heated at 100

°C – determines weight loss in 

solid sample 

2.  Use of Moisture Balance – analytical balance with heart 

source 

3.  Chemical Methods – like Karl Fisher Method (non-



gaseous Titration), make use of chemical reactivity of H

2

Ol 



used in pharmaceuticals, food and hard candy 

a.  Analysis made on sample as received – H2O as part 

of the sample’s composition 

b.  Analysis on a dried basis – H2O removed usually by 

drying 

%𝑋

%𝑁𝑉𝑀



'( *+,+-.+/

=

%𝑋



%𝑁𝑉𝑀

1.+2 /*-+/

Where x is the nonvolatile analyte and NVM is nonvolatile 

matter 


 

 

Lot



 

Representative Bulk 

Sample

 

Homogenous Laboratory 



Sample

 

Aliquot



 

Dissolving and Decomposing the Sample: 

Use solvent of progressively increasing selectivity solvents for 

dissolving sample: 

1.  H2O 


2.  Aqueous Solutions of Common Acids and Bases 

3.  Aqua Regia: 3V HCl = 1V HNO

3

 

Decomposing Samples: 



1.  With inorganic acids in open vessels like OHs, HCl, 

HNO3, H2SO4 or HClO4 (potential explosive nature) 

a.  Wet Ashing – process of oxidation decomposition of 

organic samples by liquid OHs or mixture (hot plate, 

beaker, watch glass in hood) at least 3 days 

2.  Microwave Decomposing/ Digestion – either closed or 

open vessels – higher pressure and temperature 

achieved; easy to autonate (a few minutes process but 

expensive equipment) 

3.  High-Temperature Ignition in air or oxygen – crucibles 

in a furnace; dry ashing, combustion tube methods or 

combustion with oxygen in sealed container 

4.  Fusion in molten salt media sample mixed with the 

flux. An alkali metal salt ion heated at high temperature 

(300-1000

°C) in Platinum crucibles where the amount of 

flux >10x sample mass  



Common Fluxes: 

1.  Alkali Metal carbonates, hydroxides, peroxides and 

borates – basic fluxes for acidic materials 

2.  Acidic Fluxes – pyrosulfates, acrid fluorides and boric 

oxide 

3.  Oxidizing Fluxes – Sodium Peroxide 



4.  Na

2

CO



3

 – used for silicates and other refracting oxides 



 

Concentration of Solutions: 

Molarity – number of moles of solute over liters of solution 

𝑀

3



=

#𝑚𝑜𝑙𝑠


(19:;+

𝑉

<(19:;-12

=

#𝑚𝑚𝑜𝑙𝑠


(19:;+

𝑉

=<(19:;-12



Analytical Molarity/Formality – total number of moles solute

regardless of its chemical state in 1L solution 



Equilibrium Molarity – molar concentration of a particular 

species in solution at equilibrium 



Normality – number if equivalents of solute/liters of solution 

𝑀 = 


#𝑚𝑜𝑙𝑒𝑠

𝑉

<

 = 

𝐺

(19:;+



𝑉

<

× 𝑀𝑊


(19:;+

𝑁 = 


#𝑒𝑞𝑢𝑖𝑣𝑎𝑙𝑒𝑛𝑡𝑠

𝑉

<

𝐺

(19:;+



𝑉

<

× 𝐸𝑊


(19:;+

#𝑒𝑞𝑢𝑖𝑣𝑎𝑙𝑒𝑛𝑡𝑠 = 𝑁 × 𝑉



<



𝐺

𝐸𝑊

𝑁 = 𝑛



+9+,;*12(

𝑀

𝐸𝑊 = 



𝐹𝑊

𝑛

+9+,;*12(



𝐺

=K

= 𝑀 × 𝑉



=<

 × 𝑀𝑊 =  𝑁 × 𝑉

=<

 × 𝐸𝑊


Determination of Equivalent Weights: 

1.  In Neutralization Reactions – EW of substance 

participating in the neutralization reaction is the amount of 

substance that either reacts with or supplies 1 mol of H

+

 

ions in that reaction 



𝐸𝑊

L



𝐹𝑊

L

# 𝑜𝑓 𝐻 𝑎𝑡𝑜𝑚𝑠 𝑡𝑜 𝑏𝑒 𝑓𝑟𝑒𝑒𝑑 𝑢𝑝



2.  In Redox Reaction – Ew of a participant is that amount 

that reacts with or provides one mole of the reacting cation 

if it is univalent, ½ mole if it is divalent and 1/3 mole if it is 

trivalent. The cation referred to is the cation directly 

involved in the analytical reaction 

Percent Composition: 

%𝑤 = 


𝑔

(19:;+


𝑔

(19:;-12


× 100

%𝑣 = 


𝑉

(19:;+


𝑉

(19:;-12


× 100

%

𝑤



𝑣



𝑔

(19:;+


𝑉

=<(19:;-12

× 100

Parts per Million and Parts per Billion for Solids: 

𝑝𝑝𝑚  = 


𝑔

(:W(;'2,+

𝑔

('=X9+


× 10

Y

𝑝𝑝𝑏  = 



𝑔

(:W(;'2,+

𝑔

('=X9+


× 10

Z

For Dilute Aqueous Solutions: 

𝑝𝑝𝑚  = 

𝑚𝑔

(19:;+



𝑉

<(19:;-12

𝑝𝑝𝑏  = 


𝑔

(19:;+


𝑉

<(19:;-12

𝑝𝑋 =   − 𝑙𝑜𝑔 𝑙𝑜𝑔 𝑋

 

Titer – mass of a pure substance which is chemically 

equivalent to or reacts with a fixed volume of solution (usually 

1 mL) 

Dilution Formula: 

𝑀

,12,+2;*';+/



× 𝑉

,12,+2;*';+/

=   𝑀

/-9:;+/


× 𝑉

/-9:;+/


 

 

 



STOICHIOMETRY: 

Consider the stoichiometric reaction: 

𝑎𝐴 + 𝑏𝐵 ↔ 𝑐𝐶 + 𝑑𝐷

In Volumetric Analysis, consider only the analyte and the titrant 

(A and B in the stoichiometric reaction) 

Mole Approach: 

#𝑚𝑜𝑙𝑒𝑠 𝐴  =

𝑎

𝑏

# 𝑚𝑜𝑙𝑒𝑠 𝐵



Mmol Approach: 

#𝑚𝑚𝑜𝑙𝑒𝑠 𝐴  =

𝑎

𝑏

# 𝑚𝑚𝑜𝑙𝑒𝑠 𝐵



Equivalent Approach: 

#𝑒𝑞𝑢𝑖𝑣𝑎𝑙𝑒𝑛𝑡 𝐴 =  #𝑒𝑞𝑢𝑖𝑣𝑎𝑙𝑒𝑛𝑡 𝐵



meq Approach: 

#𝑚𝑒𝑞 𝐴 =  #𝑚𝑒𝑞 𝐵



A is either solid or liquid: 

If A is liquid: 

#𝑚𝑜𝑙𝑒𝑠 𝐴 = (𝑀 × 𝑉



<

)

e



#𝑚𝑚𝑜𝑙 𝐴 = (𝑀 × 𝑉

=<

)



e

#𝑚𝑒𝑞 𝐴 = (𝑁 × 𝑉

=<

)

e



If A is solid: 

#𝑚𝑜𝑙𝑒𝑠 𝐴 = 

𝐺

e (K)


𝑀𝑊

e (


K

=19+)


#𝑚𝑚𝑜𝑙 𝐴 = 

𝐺

e (=K)



𝑀𝑊

e (


=K

==19)


#𝑚𝑒𝑞 𝐴 = 

𝐺

e (K)



𝐸𝑊

e (


=K

=+f)


Gravimetric Analysis – based upon the measurement of the 

mass of substance that has known composition and is 

chemically related to the analyte 

Precipitation Gravimetry – analyte converted to a sparingly 

soluble precipitate 

𝑎𝐴 + 𝑟𝑅  →   𝐴𝑎𝑅𝑟

(i)


𝐺

e

=   𝐺



X

× 𝐺


j

%𝐴 = 


𝐺

e

𝐺



('=X9+

× 100%


Gravimetric Factor – ratio of Formula Weights (FWs) used to 

convert mass of one chemical formula to another based on the 

stoichiometric relation between the two 

𝐺

(1:Kk; l1* (:W(;



=   𝐺

K-.+2 (:W(;

×

𝑎 × 𝐹𝑊


(1:Kk; l1* (:W(;

𝑏 × 𝐹𝑊


K-.+2 (:W(;

Volatilization Gravimetry – analyte converted to a gas of 

known chemical composition 



Electrogravimetry – analyte separated by deposition on an 

electrode and mass of the deposited product used to measure 

analyte concentration 

Requirement of Gravimetry: 

1.  Reaction should be complete and quantitative 

2.  Substance weighed should be pure and of definite 

chemical composition 

3.  Precipitating solution should have sufficiently low 

solubility 

4.  Precipitate is easily filterable and washable 

Outline of Gravimetric Procedure: 

1.  Accurate Weighing of Sample 

2.  Dissolution of Weighed Sample 

3.  Removal of Interfering Species 

4.  Adjustment of experimental environment 

5.  Addition of experimental environment 

6.  Separation of precipitate from solution 

7.  Washing of precipitate 

8.  Drying of precipitate to constant weight 

9.  Determination of amount of analyte in sample using 

stoichiometry 

Formation of Precipitate: 

Ions in solution (10

-8 

cm) → Colloidal Particles (10



-7

 to 10


-4

 cm 


– electrically charged) → precipitate (>10

-4

 cm) 



Stages of Formation of Precipitate: 

𝑀

m



+ 𝑋

n

 ↔ 𝑀𝑋



(()

1.  Supersaturation 

2.  Nucleation – clustering of M+ and X- ions ton form nuclei 

3.  Particle growth or x-tal growth – further growth of nuclei 

Mechanism of precipitation process is still not fully understood 

but quantitatively the effect of variables can be accounted for 

Assumption: particle size is related to relative supersaturation 

Van Qeimarn Ratio: 

𝑅𝑒𝑙𝑎𝑡𝑖𝑣𝑒 𝑆𝑢𝑝𝑒𝑟𝑠𝑎𝑡𝑢𝑟𝑎𝑡𝑖𝑜𝑛 =

𝑄 − 𝑆

𝑆

Q = concentration of solute at any instant 



S = its equilibrium solubility 

Particle Size of precipitate varies inversely with average 

relative supersaturation 

Large (Q-S)/S – greater number of nuclei and smaller 

precipitate particles 

Smaller (Q-S)/S – smaller number of nuclei and larger particles 

(crystalline precipitate) 

Nucleation vs. Cell Growth: 

If nucleation predominates, get larger number of smaller 

particles 

In crystal growth predominates, fewer particles of relatively 

large particles are obtained (desired outcome) 


Experimental Control of Particle Size (variables that 

minimize relative supersaturation): 

1.  Elevate Temperature (to increase S)  - precipitate from hot 

solution 

2.  Dilute Solution (to minimize Q) 

3.  Slow addition of precipitating agent with good stirring (to 

lower average value of Q) 

4.  Adjust factors that increase solubility e.g precipitate or use 

of complexing agents (more acidic, comx is much more 

soluble) 

5.  Digestion or ageing precipitate (precipitate in contact with 

mother liquor at increased temperature) 

Ostwald Ripening – for crystalline precipitates 

Coagulation – process of converting a colloidal suspension 

into a filterable solid 



Peptization – reverse process of coagulation 

Ways to coagulate a colloidal suspension: 

▪  Heating with stirring to decrease number of adsorbed ions 

▪  Adding an electrolyte to shrink counter-ions layer so 

particles are closer and agglomerate  

 

 

 



 

 

Coprecipitation – the process in which a normally soluble 

compound is carried out of a solution during precipitation of a 

desired precipitate  



4 types of Coprecipitation: 

1.  Surface Adsorption – common in coagulated colloids 

due to large surface area; normally soluble compound 

carried out of solution on the surface of a coagulated 

colloid; minimized by washing with volatile electrolyte or 

by reprecipitation 

2.  Mixed-Crystal Formation – a contaminant ion (with some 

charge and almost the same size) replaces an ion in the 

lattice of a crystal )e.g. PbSO

4

 in BaSO



4

 or MnS in CdS); 

minimized by separating interfering ion or using a different 

precipitating agent that does not give mixed-crystals with 

ions in question.  

3.  Mechanical Entrapment – a portion of the solution is 

trapped in a tiny pocket; may be minimized by employing 

conditions of low supersaturation and by digestion 

4.  Occlusion – foreign ions in the counter-ion layer may 

become trapped or occluded within the rapidly growing 

crystals may be minimized by employing conditions of low 

supersaturation and by digestion 



Homogenous Precipitation – technique in which the 

precipitating agent is chemically generated in the solution via a 

slow chemical reaction; slow appearance of precipitating agent 

and relative supersaturation is kept low 



Post Precipitation – phenomenon where the precipitate of an 

insoluble substance is followed by the gradual precipitation of 

a chemically related substance which is normally soluble 

 

 



 

       


Counter-Ion 

Layer: change a 

precipitate to the 

primary layer

 

Primary Adsorbed 



Layer: Common Ion

 

Electrical Double Layer of a Colloid



 


Download 383.93 Kb.

Do'stlaringiz bilan baham:
  1   2   3   4




Ma'lumotlar bazasi mualliflik huquqi bilan himoyalangan ©fayllar.org 2020
ma'muriyatiga murojaat qiling