Chem 28 – analytical chemistry


EQUILIBRIA AND EQUILIBRIUM CONSTANTS OF


Download 383.93 Kb.
Pdf ko'rish
bet2/4
Sana22.09.2020
Hajmi383.93 Kb.
1   2   3   4

EQUILIBRIA AND EQUILIBRIUM CONSTANTS OF 

IMPORTANTCE TO ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY: 

For the general reaction: 

𝑤𝑊 + 𝑥𝑋  ↔ 𝑦𝑌 + 𝑧𝑍

𝐾 = 

[𝑌]


y

[𝑍]


z

[𝑊]


{

[𝑋]


3

Dissociation of H

2

O: 

2𝐻

}



𝑂  ↔   𝐻

𝑂



m

+ 𝑂𝐻


n

𝐾

{



=   [𝐻

𝑂



m

][𝑂𝐻


n

]

Solubility Equilibrium:  

𝐴

3

𝐵



y

=   𝑥𝐴


ym

+ 𝑦𝐵


3n

𝐾

(X



=   [𝐴

ym

]



3

[𝐵

3n



]

y

Acid-Base Equilibrium: 



Weak Acids: 

𝐻𝐴 + 𝐻


}

𝑂  ↔   𝐻


𝑂

m



+ 𝐴

n

𝐾



e



[𝐻

𝑂



m

][𝐴


n

]

[𝐻𝐴]



Weak Base: 

𝐵 + 𝐻


}

𝑂  ↔   𝐵𝐻

m

+ 𝑂𝐻


n

𝐾



[𝐵𝐻


m

][𝑂𝐻


n

]

[𝐵]



Complex Formation Equilibrium: 

e.g.


𝐴𝑔

m

+ 2𝑁𝐻



 ↔   [𝐴𝑔(𝑁𝐻

)

}



]

m

 



𝛽 = 𝐾

𝐾



}



[𝐴𝑔(𝑁𝐻

)



}

]

m



[𝐴𝑔

m

][𝑁𝐻



]

}



Oxidation Reduction Equilibrium: 

e.g.


𝐹𝑒

}m

+ 𝐶𝑒



ƒm

↔ 𝐹𝑒


•m

+ 𝐶𝑒


•m

 

𝐾



*+/13



[𝐹𝑒

•m

][𝐶𝑒



•m

]

[𝐹𝑒



}m

][𝐶𝑒


ƒm

]

Distribution Equilibrium for a solute between immiscible 



solvents 

e.g.: 


𝐼

}('f)


 ↔ 𝐼

}(1*K)


 

𝐾

/



[𝐼

}



]

1*K


[𝐼

}

]



'f

Chemical Reactions used in Analytical Chemistry: 

▪  Acid Base Reaction 

▪  Precipitation, Gravimetric and Titration 

▪  Redox Reactions 

▪  Complex Formation 

Requirements for suitability of a reaction for use in 

Chemical Analysis: 

▪  Reaction should be stoichiometric 

▪  Reaction should take place rapidly 

▪  Reaction should be quantitative (reaction should be at 

least 99% complete); quantitative reaction with K

eq

 



≥ 10

7

 



▪  Convenient method to follow progress of reaction to 

determine when it is complete ( for titration: with suitable 

indicator) 

Reaction that go to completion and suitable for chemical 

analysis: 

▪  Formation of precipitate 

▪  Formation of un-ionized molecules 

▪  Formation of chelates or gases e.g. strong acid + strong 

base reaction 

Effect of Electrolytes on Ionic Equilibria: 

▪  For ionic participants in equilibrium reactions 

▪  Effect depends on ionic strength (ì) 

𝜇 = 


1

2



𝐶

-

𝑍



-

}

Where C is the molar concentration and z is the charge 



Electrolyte Type 

ì/c 


Examples 

1:1 


KI, NaClO

4

 

2:1 or 1:2 



MgCl


2

, Na


2

SO

4



 

2:2 


CaSO


4

 

3:2 or 2:3 



15 

Fe

2



(SO

4

)



3

 

1:3 or 3:3 



Na

3



PO

4

; Al(NO



3

)

3



 

Effect of Electrolytes on Ionic Equilibria: 

For solutions with 

ì of 0.1 or less, the electrolyte is 

independent of the kinds of ions and dependent upon the ionic 

strength e.g. soluble BaSO

4

 is the same in solutions NaI, 



KNO

3

, or AlCl



provided the 

ì is the same. 

Source of salt effect/ electrolye effect is the electrostatic 

interaction and repulsive forces between electrolyte ions and 

ions involved in an equilibrium effective concentration of ions 

like Ba

2+ 


& SO

4

-



 lesser as 

ì of the reactions becomes greater. 



Activity and Activity Coefficient: 

𝑎

3



=   𝛾

3

[𝑋]



Where 

ã is the activity coefficient (which is a function of ionic 

strength), [X] is the molar concentration  

Equilibrium Calculations yield values in better agreement with 

experimental results than those using molar concentration 

Thermodynamic Equilibrium Constant: 

Consider the general reaction: 

𝑎𝐴 + 𝑏𝐵 ↔ 𝑐𝐶 + 𝑑𝐷

𝐾

+f



𝑎

,



𝑎

Š

/



𝑎

e

'



𝑎

W



𝐾

+f



[𝐶

,

]𝛾



,

[𝐴



'

]𝛾

e



'

[𝐷



/

]𝛾

Š



/

[𝐵

W



]𝛾

W



=

[𝐶

,



][𝐷

/

]



[𝐴

'

][𝐵



W

]



𝛾

,



𝛾

Š

/



𝛾

W



𝛾

e

'



As c

i

 → 0, 



ì→0, ã

i

→1, and a



i

→[i] , Therefore K

eq

 is in terms 



of concentration only in very dilute solutions 

e.g. 


𝑋

=

𝑌



2

= 𝑚𝑋


2m

+ 𝑛𝑌


=m

 


𝐾

+f

=   𝑎



L

Υ

=



𝑎

Ž

••



2

𝐾

+f



=   [𝑋

2m

]



=

[𝑌

=m



]

2

𝛾



L

Υ

=



𝛾

Ž

••



2

=   𝛾


L

Υ

=



𝛾

Ž

••



2

∙ 𝐾′


(X

Where K’


sp

 is the concentration soluble product and K

sp

 is the 


thermodynamic equilibrium constant 

Debye-Huckel Equation – can calculate the 

ã theoretically 

− 𝑙𝑜𝑔 𝑙𝑜𝑔 (𝛾

3

) =



0.51𝑍

3

}



√𝜇

1 + 3.3𝑎


3

√𝜇

 



Where 

ã

x



 is the activity coefficient of X, Z

x

 the charge of x, 



ì 

the ionic strength of the solution and a

x

 the effective diameter 



of hydrated ion X in nanometers (10

-9

M) 



Equilibrium Calculations to Complex Systems: 

▪  Systematic approach for solving multiple-equilibrium 

problems 

▪  Used to illustrate effect of pH ad complex formation on 

solubility where equilibria are involved 

3 Types of Algebraic Equations used in solving multiple-

equilibrium problems: 

1.  Keq expressions – develop n independent  algebraic 

equations 

2.  Mass Balance Equations – containing n unknowns 

3.  A single charge-balance equation - & solve 

simultaneously 



A Systematic Method for solving Multiple-Equilibrium 

Problems: 

1.  Write the balance chemical equation (for all pertinent 

equilibria) 

2.  Set-up equation for unknown quantity ( in terms of 

equilibrium concentrations) 

3.  Write Keq expressions for all equilibria in step 1 

4.  Write mass-balance expressions for the system 

5.  Write charge-balance expressions for the system if 

possible 

6.  Count the number of equations and the number of 

unknowns; if the number of equations 

≥unknowns, then 

go to step 7; if not STOP, problem unsolvable 

a.  Make suitable approximations (to simplify 

algebra) and decide the number of unknowns 

7.  Solve equations for the unknown values 

8.  Check the validity using provisional answers→if valid, 

problem solved, if not try again and approximately 

recalculate 

*approx. can only be made in charge-balance and mass-

balance equations can assume some terms negligible or use 

computer – several software packages available for solving 

multiple, nonlinear, simultaneous equations 

Mass balance Equation 

Mass Balance Equation: relate equilibrium concentration of 

various species in a solution to 1 another and analytical 

concentrations of various solutes 

Total or analytical concentration of a substance is equal to the 

equilibrium concentrations of its various species in a solution 

e.g. HNO


2

 Solution 

𝐻𝑁𝑂

}

+  𝐻



}

𝑂  ↔   𝐻


𝑂

m



+ 𝑁𝑂

}

n



𝐶

•–—


˜

=   [𝐻𝑁𝑂


}

] + 𝑁𝑂


}

n

⋮ [𝐻



𝑂

m



]

Charge-Balance Equation – apply Electroneutrality Principle 

(electrolyte solutions are electrically neutral) 

Total Concentration of (+) ions = total concentration of (-) ions 

Molar concentrations →molar charge concentration → 

multiply molar charge concentration of ion by it charge = molar 

charge concentration 



VOLUMETRIC ANALYSIS: 

Standard Solution (Titrant) – reagent of known concentration 

used in the titration 



Equivalence Point – point in titration when amount of the 

titrant is chemically equivalent to amount of analyte in sample: 



For any titration at equivalence point: 

#𝑒𝑞𝑢𝑖𝑣 𝑎𝑛𝑎𝑙𝑦𝑡𝑒 = #𝑒𝑞𝑢𝑖𝑣 𝑡𝑖𝑡𝑟𝑎𝑛𝑡



End Point – point in titration which estimates the equivalence 

point by observing some physical changes associated with the 

equivalence point 

▪  Most common endpoint – color change due to titrant, 

analyte or indicator 

▪  Can use instruments to detect endpoints, e.g. if physical 

property is potential or conductivity 

Back Titration – process in which an excess of standard 

solution is added to the analyte and excess amount of 

standard determined by titration with a 2

nd

 standard solution; 



required when rate of reaction between analyte and standard 

reagent is slow or when standard reagent lacks stability 



Requirements for Volumetric Chemical Reaction: 

▪  Reaction must proceed according to a definite chemical 

reaction 

▪  Reaction must be complete (K

eq

 

≥ 10



7

▪  Availability of a method to detect endpoint 



▪  The reaction must be rapid 

Primary Standard – an ultrapure scompound that serves as the 

reference material for a titrimetric method of analysis 

Requirements for a Primary Standard: 

▪  High purity (~99.5% pure) 

▪  Stability toward air 

▪  Absence of hydrated H

2



▪  Readily available at a reasonable cost 



▪  Reasonable solubility in titration medium 

▪  Reasonably large molar mass or FW (minimize relative 

error in weighing) with required inc’s directly with FW 

Desired Properties of Standard Solutions: 

▪  Sufficiently stable 

▪  Reacts rapidly with analyte 

▪  Reacts completely with analyte 

▪  Undergo selective reaction with analyte that can be 

described by a simple balanced equation 



Methods to establish concentration of standard solutions:  

1.  Direct Method – weighed quantity of a primary standard 

dissolved in suitable solvent and diluted to an exactly 

known volume 

2.  Standardization – titrant to be standardized is used to 

titrate: 

a.  A weighed quantity of a primary standard 

b.  Weighed quantity of a secondary standard 

(compound whose purity was determined by chemical 

analysis and serves as reference material for titration) 

c.  Measured volume of another standard solution 



Secondary Standard Solution – titrant standardized against 

a 2” standard or against another standard solution 



Neutralization Titrations: 

Analytes – acids or bases that can be converted to such 

species by chemical treatment 



Standard Solutions – strong acids or strong bases (react 

more completely than their weaker counterparts 



Titration Curve:  

Plot some function of analyte or titrant concentration vs. V

titrant

 

or instrument reading 



Stages of Titration: 

▪  Initial point 

▪  Pre-equivalence region 

▪  Equivalence point  

●  Equivalence Point Region – large ÄpH for small 

ÄV  


▪  Post equivalence region 

Effect of Concentration on Titration Curve: 

ÄpH at equivalence point region decreases as concentration 

of analyte or titrant decreases 

Acid-Base Indicators – week, organic acid/base whose 

undissociated form differs in color from its conjugate base/acid 

form.  

Typical Equilibrium Reaction: 

Acidic Indicator: 

𝐻𝐼𝑛 + 𝐻


}

𝑂  ↔   𝐼𝑛

n

+  𝐻


𝑂

m



(acid color)  

(base color) 



Basic Indicator: 

𝐼𝑛 + 𝐻


}

𝑂  ↔   𝐼𝑛𝐻

m

+ 𝑂𝐻


n

(base color)  

(acid color) 

For HIn: 

𝐾

'



[𝐻



𝑂

m

][𝐼𝑛



n

]

[𝐻𝐼𝑛]



 

[𝐻



𝑂

m

] =   𝐾



'

[•š2]


[š2

]



 

When [HIn]/[In

-



≥ 10: HIn exhibits its pure acid color 



When [HIn]/[In

-



≤ 0.1: HIn exhibits its true base color 

[H

3



O

+



≥ 10 K

a

 for full acid color 



[H

3

O



+

≤ 0.1 K



a

 for full base color 



Indicator pH Range: 

𝑝𝐻 (𝑎𝑐𝑖𝑑 𝑐𝑜𝑙𝑜𝑟) =   − 𝑙𝑜𝑔 𝑙𝑜𝑔 (10 𝐾

'

) = 𝑝𝐾


'

− 1


 

𝑝𝐻 (𝑏𝑎𝑠𝑖𝑐 𝑐𝑜𝑙𝑜𝑟) =   − 𝑙𝑜𝑔 𝑙𝑜𝑔 (0.1 𝐾

'

) = 𝑝𝐾


'

+ 1


 

𝐼𝑛𝑑𝑖𝑐𝑎𝑡𝑜𝑟 𝑝𝐻 𝑅𝑎𝑛𝑔𝑒 =   𝑝𝐾

'

± 1


(approximate pH transition range of most acid-base indicators) 

Indicator Choice: 

▪  Can use any indicator which could change color at the 

equivalence point of the titration 

▪  Equivalence point region: pH 4-10; can use any indicator 

changing color in this region 

▪  Smaller equivalence point region with dilution lessens 

choice of indicator 

BUFFER SOLUTIONS: 

Buffer Solutions – a solution of a weak acid and its conjugate 

base or a weak base and its conjugate acid that resists 

changes in pH of a solution as a result of either dilution or 

small addition of acids or bases 

HA + A

-



𝐻𝐴 + 𝐻

}

𝑂  ↔   𝐻



𝑂

m



+  𝐴

n

𝐻



𝑂

m



= 𝐾

'

[𝐻𝐴]



[𝐴

n

]



𝐾

'



[𝐻

𝑂



m

][𝐴


n

]

[𝐻𝐴]



Henderson – Hasselbalch Equation: 

𝑝𝐻 = 𝑝𝐾


'

+ 𝑙𝑜𝑔 𝑙𝑜𝑔

[𝐴

n

]



[𝐻𝐴]

 

Properties of Buffer Solutions: 

▪  Essentially independent of dilution 

▪  Resist pH change after addition of small amounts of 

strong acids or bases  

Addition of Strong Acid or Base to Buffer solutions:  

▪  Addition of a strong base converts the acid into its 

conjugate base thus increasing the base and decreasing 

the acid leading to a small change in the ratio and a small 

ÄpH 

▪  Addition of a strong acid converts the base into its 



conjugate acid thus increasing the acid and decreasing 

the base leading to a small change in the ratio and a small 

ÄpH 

Buffer Capacity: 

▪  number of moles of a strong acid or strong base that 

causes 1.00L of the buffer to undergo a 1.00 unit change 

in pH 


▪  depends on the total concentration of its components and 

also on their concentration ratio  

▪  at max when ratio = 1 


Preparation of Buffers – a buffer solution of any derived pH 

can be prepared by combining calculated quantities of a 

suitable conjugate acid/base pair 

Composition of Buffer Solutions as a Function of pH ( use 

of á-values): 

Consider acidic buffer with HA + A

-

:  


𝐶

ž

= [𝐻𝐴] + [𝐴



n

]

𝛼



 



[𝐻𝐴]

𝐶

ž



[𝐻



𝑂

m

]



[𝐻

𝑂



m

] + 𝐾


'

𝛼



[𝐴

n



]

𝐶

ž



𝐾

'



[𝐻

𝑂



m

] +  𝐾


'

𝛼

 



+ 𝛼

= 1



Titration Curve for Weak Acids: 

Consider the reaction of 50.00 mL 0.1000M HOAc (K

a

 = 1.75 x 



10

5

) with 0.1000m NaOH  



𝐻𝑂𝐴𝑐 + 𝑁𝑎𝑂𝐻  →   𝐻

}

𝑂 + 𝑁𝑎𝑂𝐴𝑐



1.  Initial pH (V

NaOH


 = 0.00 mL) 

𝐻𝑂𝐴𝑐 + 𝐻


}

𝑂  ↔   𝐻


𝑂

m



+ 𝑂𝐴𝑐

n

𝐾



'



[𝐻

𝑂



m

][𝑂𝐴𝑐


n

]

[𝐻𝑂𝐴𝑐]



=   ¡𝐾

'

[𝐻𝑂𝐴𝑐]



pH = 2.88 

2.  Pre-equivalence Point 

[𝐻𝑂𝐴𝑐] = 

#𝑚𝑜𝑙𝑒𝑠


'; +f:-.. X;

− # 𝑚𝑜𝑙𝑒𝑠

;-;*'2;

𝑉

ž1;'9



Use either K

a

 expression or Henderson-Hasselbalch Equation to 



find pH 

pH = 4.16 

3.  Equivalence Point (all HOAc converted to OAc

-

 



𝑂𝐴𝑐

n

+  𝐻



}

𝑂  ↔  𝐻𝑂𝐴𝑐 + 𝑂𝐻

n

𝐾

'



[𝐻𝑂𝐴𝑐][𝑂𝐻

n

]

[𝑂𝐴𝑐



n

]

=   ¡𝐾



W

[𝑂𝐴𝑐


n

]

pOH = 5.27    



pH = 8.73 

4.  Post Equivalence Point (excess NaOH) 

[𝑂𝐻

n

] = 



# 𝑚𝑜𝑙𝑒𝑠

;-;*'2;


−#𝑚𝑜𝑙𝑒𝑠

'; +f:-.. X;

𝑉

ž1;'9


pOH = 4.00   

pH = 10.00 



Determination of K



or K

b

 for weak acids or bases using 

potentiometric titration (pH meter + glass pH electrode) 

▪  For weak acid, at half-neutralization: pH = pK

a

 

▪  For weak base, at half-neutralization: pOH = pK



b

 

Effect of Concentration on Titration Curves for Weak 



Acids: 

▪  Initial pH values are higher and equivalence point. pH is 

lower for more dilute concentrations of acid or titrant  

▪  At intermediate titrant volumes, pH values differ only 

slightly due to buffering action 

Effect of Reaction Completeness: 

▪  The more complete a reaction between acid and base, the 

larger the 

ÄpH at equivalence point region 

▪  The smaller K

a

 is, the higher the pH at equivalence point 



and the smaller the 

ÄpH 


Titration Curve for Weak Base: 

Derivation is analogous to that of a weak acid 

 

 


COMPLEX ACID-BASE SYSTEMS 

Complex Acid-Base Systems – mixture of a strong acid and 

weak acid (K

a

 



≤ 10

-4



Concentration of approximately same order of magnitude 

In early stages of titration (before 1

st

 equivalence point); 



titration curve identical to strong acid 

After 1


st

 equivalence point, remainder of titration curve identical 

to that of dilute solution of weak acid 

Polyfunctional Acids and Bases: 

pH of Polyfunctional Systems – determined using systematic 

approach to multiple equilibrium problem (solve simultaneous 

equations) 

Buffer Solutions involving Polyprotic Acids: 

2 buffers can be prepared from weak acid H

2

A and its salts: 



1.  H

2

A + NaHA 



2.  NaHA + Na

2



pH of (2) > pH of (1) 

estimate pH by assuming a single principal equilibrium and 

using the Henderson-Hasselbalch Equation 

Salts with both acidic and basic properties – formed during 

neutralization titration of polyfunctional acids and bases 

If Ka1>Kb2, solution is acidic, otherwise basic 

Titration curves for Polyfunctional Acids: 

Multiple endpoints observed 

For titration step to be distinct K

a1

/K



a2

 > 10


3

 

Titration Curve for a Diprotic Acid: 



Initial pH – consider only 1

st

 dissociation step 



Before 1

st

 equivalence point – 1



st

 Buffer region  

1

st

 Equivalence Point (with solution of salt of HM



-

After 1



st

 equivalence point but before 2

nd

 equivalence point 



(second buffer region) 

2

nd



 equivalence point (with solution of Na2M) 

pH beyond equivalence point (with excess base/ NaOH) 

Titration Curves for Polyfunctional Acids and Bases: 

Titration of H3PO4 – with 2 well-defined endpoints like 

H2PO42-: Kb2>Kb1; can be titrated with standard acid but not 

with standard base 

Ttration of Carbonates and Alkali mixtures: 

Substance 

Relation between 

volumes 


Mmoles 

substance 

present 

NaOH 


V

2

 = 0 



M x V

1

 



Na

2

CO



3

 

V



1

 = V


2

 

M x V



1

 

NaHCO



3

 

V



1

 = 0 


M x V

2

 



NaOH + Na

2

CO



3

 

V



1

>V

2



 

NaOH: 


Na

2

CO



3

V



1

2

 



NaHCO

3



NaHCO

3

 + 



Na

2

CO



3

 

Na



2

CO

3



 

 



Download 383.93 Kb.

Do'stlaringiz bilan baham:
1   2   3   4




Ma'lumotlar bazasi mualliflik huquqi bilan himoyalangan ©fayllar.org 2020
ma'muriyatiga murojaat qiling