Chem 28 – analytical chemistry


Download 383.93 Kb.
Pdf ko'rish
bet3/4
Sana22.09.2020
Hajmi383.93 Kb.
1   2   3   4

PRECIPITATION TITRATION 

Effect of Concentration on Titration Curves – increase in 

concentration enhances 

ÄpX at equivalence point region 

(same trend as in acid-base titration)  

Effect of Reaction Completion on Titration Curves – greatest 

ÄpX I titration of ion which forms the least soluble Ag+ salt 

(represents most nearly complete reaction) 

𝐴𝑔

m

+ 𝑋



n

↔ 𝐴𝑔𝑋


𝐾 = 

1

[𝐴𝑔



m

][𝑋


n

]



1

𝐾

(X



The smaller the K

sp

, the larger the K for titration 



Endpoints of Argentometric Titrations: 

Chemical - indicators 

Potentiometric – pH meter; voltage converted to pH (Potential) 

Amperometric – current measured by ammeter 

Chemical Indicators for Precipitation Titrations: 

Analyte A, Titrant B and Indicator In 

Titration Reaction: 

𝐴 + 𝐵 → 𝐴𝐵

Endpoint Reaction: 

𝐼𝑛 + 𝐵 → 𝐼𝑛𝐵

In B – with significant difference in appearance in solution than 

In at end point; color change  

Types of Argentometric titrations: 

1.  The Mohr Method – formation of a 2

nd

 precipitate) – 



widely applied for the titration of Cl, Br, or Cn with 

standard AgNO

3

 

Indicator Na



2

CrO


4

 

Titration Reaction: (White Precipitate) 



𝐴𝑔

m

+ 𝐶𝑙



n

↔   𝐴𝑔𝐶𝑙


(()

Endpoint Reaction: (Red Precipitate) 

2𝐴𝑔

m

+  𝐶𝑟𝑂



ƒ

}n

↔   𝐴𝑔2𝐶𝑟𝑂



ƒ(()

K

sp



 AgCl  = 1.8 x 10

-10 


K

sp

 Ag



2

CrO


4

 = 1.2 x 10

-12

 

Mohr Titration at pH 7-10; pH < 7 [CrO



4

2-

] protonates; pH >10 



Ag

2

O precipitates 



Solubility – Ag

2

CrO



4

 is more soluble than AgCl so all x- 

precipitate as Ag

2

CrO



4

 with correct pH  

2.  Volhard Method – formation of a colored complex; 

Ag

+



 titrated with standard KSCN; titration in acidic 

solution to prevent precipitation of Fe

3+

 as hydrated 



oxide; most important application – indirect 

determination of X

-

( add excess Ag



+

 and back titration 

with standard SCN

-



Titration Reaction: 

𝐴𝑔

m



+  𝑆𝐶𝑁

n

↔  𝐴𝑔𝑆𝐶𝑁



(()

Endpoint Reaction: (blood red complex wherein Fe

2+

 is the 


indicator) 

𝐹𝑒

}m



+  𝑆𝐶𝑁

n

↔  𝐹𝑒𝑆𝐶𝑁



}m

K

f



 = 1.05 x 10

5

 



3.  Fajan’s Method – make use of adsorption indicators 

Adsorption Indicators – an organic compound that tends to be 

absorbed unto the surface of the solid in precipitation 

titration e.g fluorescein 

e.g Titration of Cl

-

 with AgNO



3

 which will form a colloidal 

precipitate 

𝐴𝑔

m



+ 𝐶𝑙

n

↔   𝐴𝑔𝐶𝑙



(()

Before Equivalence Point (with excess Cl

-

):  


(AgCl) | Cl

| M



+

  

After Equivalence Point (with excess Ag



+

):  


(AgCl) | Ag

+

 | x



-

 / FI


-

 (pinkish red) (can be NO

3

-

, the indicator or 



any anion) 

Fluorescein - adsorption indicator (HFI) 

Color Change – yellow green to pinkish red; due to adsorption 

process and not precipitation 

Ion Product Q > K

eq

, precipitation 



 

 


COMPLEX FORMATION TITRATION/ COMPLEXOMETRIC 

TITRATION: 

Coordination Compounds/ Complexes – formed by the 

reaction of a metal ion with ligands via a Lewis Acid and Base 

Reaction wherein the metal acts as the Lewis Acid (e- pair 

acceptor) and the ligands act as the Lewis Base (e- pair donor) 

Chelate – complex produced when metal ions coordinates with 

2 or more donor groups of a single ligand to form a 

heterocyclic ring 

EDTA – hexadentate ligand with 6 donor atoms (2N and 4O) 

with 4 acidic Hs with 4 K

a



Total Molar Concentration of Uncomplexed EDTA 



𝐶

ž

= [𝑌



ƒn

] +  [𝐻𝑌


•n

] +  [𝐻


}

𝑌

}n



] + [𝐻

𝑌



n

] + [𝐻


ƒ

𝑌]


𝛼

 



[𝐻

ƒ

𝑌]



𝐶

ž

𝛼





[𝐻

𝑌



n

]

𝐶



ž

𝛼

}



[𝐻

}



𝑌

}n

]



𝐶

ž

𝛼





[𝐻𝑌

•n

]



𝐶

ž

𝛼



ƒ



[𝑌

ƒn

]



𝐶

ž

Plot of 



á values vs. pH;  

K’ - conditional & effective formation constant (pH dependent 

K

eq

, applicable at a single pH only); used to calculate the 



equilibrium concentration of a metal ion and complex at any 

point in the titration curve  

𝑀

2m

+ 𝑌



ƒn

 ↔   𝑀𝑌


(2nƒ)

𝐾

¢Ž



=   𝐾

'W(


[𝑀𝑌


(2nƒ)

]

[𝑀



2m

][𝑌


ƒn

]

𝐾′



¢Ž



[𝑀𝑌

(2nƒ)


]

[𝑀

2m



]𝐶

ž

=   𝛼



ƒ

𝐾

¢Ž



EDTA Titration: 

pM vs V EDTA 

1.  Initial pM (V EDTA = 0ml) : pM = -log [M

n+



2.  Preequivalence Point (V EDTA = xml) 

𝑝𝑀 =   − 𝑙𝑜𝑔 𝑙𝑜𝑔

𝑚𝑜𝑙𝑠

¢

− 𝑚𝑜𝑙𝑠



£Šže

𝑉

ž1;'9



 

3.  Equivalence Point (V EDTA = yml) 

¤𝑀𝑌

(2nƒ)


¥ = 

𝑚𝑜𝑙𝑠


¢

𝑉

+f:-9.



[𝑀

2m

] =   𝐶



ž

𝐾′

¢Ž



[𝑀𝑌


(2nƒ)

]

[𝑀



2m

]𝐶

ž



[𝑀

2m

]



}



[𝑀𝑌

(2nƒ)


]

𝐾′

¢Ž



4.  Post Equivalence Point (with excess EDTA) 

¤𝑀𝑌


(2nƒ)

¥ = 


𝑚𝑜𝑙𝑠

¢

𝑉



;1;'9

[𝑌

ƒn



] =   𝐶

ž



𝑚𝑜𝑙𝑠

£Šže


− 𝑚𝑜𝑙𝑠

¢

𝑉



ž1;'9

𝐾′

¢Ž



[𝑀𝑌


(2nƒ)

]

[𝑀



2m

]𝐶

ž



[𝑀

2m

]



}



[𝑀𝑌

(2nƒ)


]

𝐾′

¢Ž



Cations with larger K

f

 provide good end points even in acidic 



solutions Fe

3+

 and In



3+

 can be ti trated even at strongly acidic 

solutions (pH = 2) 

Ca

2+



, Zn

2+

, Al



3+

. Fe


2+

 in moderately acidic pH only 

Auxillary Complexing Agent – sometimes added to keep metal 

ion in the solution at pH required for the titration; decreases the 

sharpness of the endpoints e.g. Zn

2+

 titration in NH



3

-NH


4

Cl 


buffer – NH

3

 prevents formation of Zn(OH)



2

 by forming NH

complexes with the Zn



2+

 

Titration Reaction: 



𝑍𝑛(𝑁𝐻

)



ƒ

}m

+ 𝐻𝑌



•n

 → 𝑍𝑛𝑌


}n

+ 3𝑁𝐻


+ 𝑁𝐻


ƒ

m

Metallochromic Indicators – colored organic compounds (dyes) 



that form colored chelates with metal ions; chelates of different 

color for free indicator; widely used Eriochrome Black T (EBT) 

𝐻

}

𝐼𝑛



n

(𝑟𝑒𝑑) + 𝐻

}

𝑂  ↔ 𝐻𝐼𝑛


}n

(𝑏𝑙𝑢𝑒) + 𝐻

𝑂

m



𝐻𝐼𝑛

}n

(𝑏𝑙𝑢𝑒)



+ 𝐻

}

𝑂  ↔ 𝐼𝑛



•n

(𝑜𝑟𝑎𝑛𝑔𝑒) + 𝐻

𝑂

m



At pH >7, blue HIn

2-

 predominate if there are no metal ions 



Endpoint Reaction: 

𝑀𝐼𝑛


n

(𝑟𝑒𝑑) + 𝐻𝑌

•n

↔   𝐻𝐼𝑛


}n

(𝑏𝑙𝑢𝑒) +  𝑀𝑌

}n

K

f metal-indicator <.



1  

K

f metal-EDTA Complex



 otherwise premature endpoint is observed 

Titration Methods Employing EDTA: 

1.  Direct 

2.  Back  

3.  Displacement 

Determination of Water Hardness – determination of water 

quality through the titration of EDTA  

Hardness – total concentration of alkaline earth ions in water 

[Ca

2+

] & [Mg



2+

] > concentration of other alkaline earth ions 

Hardness  = [Ca

2+

] + [Mg



2+

] expressed in CaCO

3

/Li 


Water Hardness Category 

CaCO

3

/Li 

Soft 

<17.1 

Moderately Soft 

17.1-60 


Moderately Hard 

60-120 


Hard 

120-180 


Very Hard 

>180 


Liebig Titration – titration involving unidentate ligand; endpoint 

is marked by appearance of turbidity (precipitation of AgCN) 

𝐴𝑔

m

+ 2𝐶𝑁



n

↔ 𝐴𝑔(𝐶𝑁)


}

n

𝐴𝑔



m

+ 𝐴𝑔(𝐶𝑁)


}

n

↔   𝐴𝑔



m

[𝐴𝑔(𝐶𝑁)


}

]

𝑜𝑟 𝐴𝑔𝐶𝑁



Deniyes Modification: 

𝐾𝐼 + 𝑁𝐻


→ 𝐴𝑔𝐼 (𝑝𝑎𝑙𝑒 𝑦𝑒𝑙𝑙𝑜𝑤)

Generalized Equation for Redox Reaction: 

𝐴

*+/



+ 𝐵

13

 ↔ 𝐴



13

+  𝐵


*+/

Red: 


𝐵

13

+  𝑛𝑒



n

 ↔ 𝐵


*+/

 


Ox: 

𝐴

*+/



 ↔ 𝐴

13

+  𝑛𝑒



n

 

Redox Reactions are typically carried out in an electrochemical 



cell in which the reactants (OA and RA) are not in direct 

contact with one another; connected via salt bridge 

Electrochemical Cell – 2 conductors (electrodes) each of which 

is immersed in an electrolyte solution 

Cathode – electrode where reduction occurs 

Anode – electrode where oxidation occurs 

Electrodes – can be metal electrodes directly involved in the 

reaction or an inert electrode like Pt 

Cathodic Reaction when there is no easily reduced species: 

2𝐻

m



+ 2𝑒

n

↔ 𝐻



}(K)

Anodic Reaction when there is no easily oxidized species: 

2𝐻

}

𝑂  ↔ 𝑂



}(K)

+  4𝐻


m

+  4𝑒


n

Types of Electrochemical Cells: 

Galvanic or Voltaic Cells – with spontaneous redox reaction 

Electrolytic Cell – with nonspontaneous redox reaction and 

requires an external source of electrical energy for operation 

Schematic Representation of Cells: 

Anode | Electrolyte Solution of Anode || Electrolyte Solution of 

Cathode | Cathode 

Electrons from the anode to the cathode 

If some cell is connected to a battery, the electron flow is 

reversed thus producing an electrolytic cell 

Reversible Cell – in which the direction of the electrochemical 

reaction is reversed when the direction of the current (electron 

flow is reversed) 

Irreversible Cell – cell wherein the reversing of the current 

causes an entirely different half-reaction to occur at either one 

or both the electrodes 

Electrode potential – measure of the tendency for the reaction 

to proceed from a nonequilibrium state to equilibrium. 

∆𝐺 =   −𝑛𝐹𝐸°

,+99

=   −𝑅𝑇 𝑙𝑛 𝑙𝑛 𝐾



+f

 

Cell Potential: 



Saturated Calomel Electrode – E

SCE


 = 0.244V 

𝐻𝑔

}



𝐶𝑙

}

+ 2𝑒



n

 ↔ 2𝐻𝑔


(9)

+ 2𝐶𝑙


('f)

n

Standard Hydrogen Electrode (SHE) – basis of oxidation-



reduction potentials E

° = 0.00V  

2𝐻

m

+ 2𝑒



n

↔ 𝐻


}(K)

Strongest Reducing Element – Li metal 

Strongest Oxidizing Element – Fluorine 

IUPAC Convention – electronic potential is reversed 

exclusively for half-reactions written as reductions  

Reverse reactions are spontaneous when standard state 

conditions apply 

Sign of the electrode potential indicates whether the reaction is 

spontaneous  

Nernst Equation: 

𝐸 = 𝐸° −

𝑅𝑇

𝑛𝐹



𝑙𝑛 𝑙𝑛

𝑎



,

𝑎

Š



/

𝑎



e

'

𝑎



W



 

𝐸 = 𝐸° − 

0.0592

𝑛

𝑙𝑜𝑔 𝑙𝑜𝑔



𝑎

,



𝑎

Š

/



𝑎

e



'

𝑎



W

 



If x = solute, a

x

 ~ [x] 



If x = gas, a

x

 ~ Px, atm 



If x = pure liquid, solvent or solid, a

x

 ~ 1  



Formal Potential – electrode potential when analytical 

concentrations are used in the place of molar concentrations 

Thermodynamic Potential of an Electrochemical Cell (E

cell


): 

𝐸

,+99



= 𝐸

,';k1/+


− 𝐸

'21/+


Calculation of Redox Equilibrium Constants from Standard 

Potentials: 

𝐵

13

+  𝑏𝑒



n

 ↔ 𝐵


*+/

𝐴

13



 + 𝑎𝑒

n

↔ 𝐴



*+/

Cathode: 

𝑎𝐵

13

+ 𝑎𝑒



n

 ↔ 𝑎𝐵


*+/

 

Anode: 



𝑏𝐴

*+/


 ↔ 𝑏𝐴

13

+  𝑏𝑒



n

 

Balanced Reaction: 



𝑏𝐴

*+/


+ 𝑎𝐵

13

 ↔ 𝑏𝐴



13

+  𝑎𝐵


*+/

 

At equilibrium 



ÄG = 0, ÄG = -nFE 

𝐸

,+99



= 0 = 𝐸

,';k1/+


− 𝐸

'21/+


𝐸

,';k1/+


= 𝐸

'21/+


𝐸°



0.0592

𝑎𝑏

 = 𝐸°



e

0.0592



𝑎𝑏

𝑙𝑜𝑔 𝑙𝑜𝑔


[𝐴

*+/


]

W

[𝐴



13

]

W



 

𝐸°



−𝐸°

e



0.0592

𝑎𝑏

 = 



0.0592

𝑎𝑏

𝑙𝑜𝑔 𝑙𝑜𝑔 𝐾



+f

𝑙𝑜𝑔 𝑙𝑜𝑔 𝐾

+f

 = 


𝑎𝑏(𝐸°

−𝐸°



e

)

0.0592



Redox Titration Curve: electrode potential for the redox system 

vs. V


Titrant 

Indicators Used: OA or RA that responds to the change in 

potential of the system rather than changes in concentration of 

any particular product or reactant 

Electrode Potential System – equilibrium attained after each 

addition of titrant; system at equilibrium at all times throughout 

the titration 

Example: 

𝐶𝑒

ƒm

+ 𝐹𝑒



}m

↔ 𝐶𝑒


•m

+ 𝐹𝑒


•m

𝐸

(y(;+=



= 𝐸

‰+

¥



− 𝐸

j+

-•



If indicator is present: (concentrations vary as titration 

proceeds; E

system

 varies as well)



𝐸

š2

= 𝐸



(y(;+=

= 𝐸


‰+

¥



𝐸

j+

-•



Hypothetical Cell of the Titration Mixture: 

SHE||Ce

4+

,Ce



3+

,Fe


3+

, Fe


2+

|Pt 


Apply Nernst Equation: 

1.  Before equivalence point: 

𝐸

‰+

¥



 

2.  Equivalence Point:

𝐸

‰+

¥



& 𝐸

j+

-•



 

3.  After Equivalence Point:

𝐸

j+

-•



 

Effect of Completeness of Reaction in Redox Titration Curves: 

The larger the Keq, the larger the 

ÄE at the equivalence point 

region 

Effect of Concentration of redox Titration Curves: 



Titration Curves are independent of concentration of reactants 

and are independent of dilution over a considerable range 

Types of Redox Indicators: 

1.  General Redox Indicators – respond to the potential 

of a system; substance that changes color upon being 

oxidized or reduced; change in color depends only 

upon potential of the system  

𝐼𝑛

13



↔ 𝐼𝑛

*+/


𝐸 = 𝐸°

š2



0.0592

𝑛

𝑙𝑜𝑔 𝑙𝑜𝑔



[𝐼𝑛

*+/


]

[𝐼𝑛


13

]

 



Color change occurs when there is a change in the ratio of the 

reactants of about 100  

[𝐼𝑛

*+/


]

[𝐼𝑛


13

]

<

1

10

𝑐ℎ𝑎𝑛𝑔𝑒𝑠 𝑡𝑜



[𝐼𝑛

*+/


]

[𝐼𝑛


13

]

≥ 10



Full color change when 

𝐸 = 𝐸°


š2

± 


0.0592

𝑛

Choose indicator which would change color near the 



equivalence point 

e.g Ferroin (Phen)

3

Fe

2+



 

𝑃ℎ



𝐹𝑒

•m

+ 𝑒



n

 ↔ 𝑃ℎ


𝐹𝑒

}m



𝐹𝑒𝑟𝑟𝑖𝑖𝑛 (𝑏𝑙𝑢𝑒)(𝑜𝑥) ↔ 𝐹𝑒𝑟𝑟𝑜𝑖𝑛(𝑟𝑒𝑑)(𝑟𝑒𝑑)

2.  Specific Indicator – reacts in a specific manner with 

one of the reactants in titration to produce a color e.g. 

Starch forms a dark blue complex with I

3

-

 which is the 



end point of titrations with I

2

 or KSCN (blood red 



complex)  

Iodometry – indirect; I

3

-

 is more soluble and it keeps the I



2

 in 


the solution 

Iodimetry – direct 

Redox Titration: 

Redox Titration – widely used in titrimetric analysis; analyte 

can be present in the sample in more than 1 oxidation state 

and must be converted to a single oxidation state prior to its 

titration; auxillary OA (e.g. H

2

O



2

) or RA (Zn, Cd, Hg) may be 

added to accomplish this 

Standard Oxidants: 

Reagent 

Reduction 

Product 

Standard 

Potential (V) 

1

° Standard 



Used 

KMnO


4

 

Mn



2+

 

1.51 



Na

2

C



2

O

4



, Fe, 

As

2



O

3

 



KBrO

3

 



Br

-

 



1.44 

KBrO


3

 

Ce



4+

 

Ce



3-

 

1.44 



Na

2

C



2

O

4



, Fe, 

As

2



O

3

,  



K

2

Cr



2

O

7



 

Cr

3+



 

1.33 


K

2

Cr



2

O

7



, Fe 

I

2



 

I

-



 

0.536 


BaS

2

O



3

∙H

2



O, 

Na

2



S

2

O



3

 

 KMnO



– most widely used of all standard oxidizing agents; 

readily available; inexpensive, requires no indicator 

𝑀𝑛𝑂


ƒ

n

+ 8𝐻



m

+ 5𝑒


n

↔ 𝑀𝑛


}m

+ 4𝐻


}

𝑂 E° = 1.51V 

In Acidic Solution: 

𝐻

}



𝐶

}

𝑂



ƒ

↔ 2𝐶𝑂


}

+ 2𝐻


m

+ 2𝑒


n

 E

° = 



0.48V 

Reaction with KMnO4: 

 

2𝑀𝑛𝑂


ƒ

n

+ 5𝐻



}

𝐶

}



𝑂

ƒ

+ 6𝐻



m

+ 5𝑒


n

↔ 2𝑀𝑛


}m

+

10𝐶𝑂



}

+ 8𝐻


}

𝑂 

Ce



4+

 in H


2

SO

4



 – powerful oxidizing agent; yellow-orange; 

stoichiometry of reaction is simple; indefinitely stable but 

relatively high cost of Ce

4+

 compounds; indicator ferroin 



I

2

 – solutions are weak oxidizing agents; used for the 



determination of strong reductants; lack stability; must be 

restandardized regularly; I

2

 is not very soluble in water; 



dissolved moderately in concentrated KI 

𝐼



n

+ 2𝑒


n

↔ 3𝐼


n

Iodimetry – I

2

 used as OA 



Iodometry – I

2

 used as RA; standard Na



2

S

2



O

3

 used to titrate I



2

 

liberated by reaction of analyte in measured excess KI in 



slightly acidic solution 

𝐼

}



+ 2𝑆

}

𝑂



}n

↔ 2𝐼



n

+ 𝑆


ƒ

𝑂

Y



}n

𝐼𝑂



n

+ 5𝐼


n

+ 6𝐻


m

↔ 3𝐼


}

+ 3𝐻


}

𝑂

3𝐼



}

+ 6𝑒


n

↔ 6𝐼


n

1 𝑚𝑜𝑙 𝐼𝑂


n

≡ 3 𝑚𝑜𝑙𝑠 𝐼



}

≡ 6 𝑚𝑜𝑙𝑠 𝑆

}

𝑂



}n

𝐸𝑊

µš—



-

=

𝐹𝑊



µš—

-

6



Indicator: Starch (specific indicator) – deep blue complex with 

I

2



 

Standard Reductants – standard solutions of reducing agents 

tend to react with atomic O2; titrations carried out in reagents 

under an inert atom; Indirect method used – aliquot containing 

excess reductant added to the sample and the excess is 

quickly back titrated with standard oxidant 



Download 383.93 Kb.

Do'stlaringiz bilan baham:
1   2   3   4




Ma'lumotlar bazasi mualliflik huquqi bilan himoyalangan ©fayllar.org 2020
ma'muriyatiga murojaat qiling