Chronology of the Key Historical Events on the Western Seas of the Russian Arctic


Download 0.66 Mb.
Pdf ko'rish
bet1/10
Sana10.01.2019
Hajmi0.66 Mb.
  1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   10

Chronology of the Key Historical Events

on the Western Seas of the Russian Arctic

(the Barents Sea, the White Sea,

the Kara Sea)

Ninth century

870


–890

The travel of Otar, a Viking from the Norwegian province of Hologaland (now Helgeland),

who discovered the way to the White Sea. The story of this journey was recorded from his own

words by the English King, Alfred the Great.

9th

–10th century



The beginning of the Russian advance to the north and northeast and their appearance on the

shores of the White Sea and the Barents Sea.

Tenth century

920


The Viking Eirik Bloodaxe sailed in the mouth of the Northern Dvina (it was called

“Vina” in

the sagas).

965


The son of Eirik Bloodaxe, the Viking Harald Grey Cloak made a trip to the mouth of the

Northern Dvina.

Eleventh century

11th century

The people of Novgorod, coming out of the White Sea, won Biarmia, the country located on

the Pechora River and the Northern Dvina.

1026

The mouth of the Northern Dvina was visited by the Viking Torer Dog, who



first engaged in

peaceful trade but ended up plundering the temple of Iomala (supposedly located on the site of

the current Kholmogory).

Twelfth century

12th century (

first


half)

The mention in the annals of the Terskiy Shore (the White Sea Throat), among Novgorod

’s

possessions.



1110 or 1130

The archbishop of Novgorod, John, founded a monastery of the Archangel Michael (at the

mouth of the Northern Dvina), at which there was a settlement, an early precursor of the port

and the city of Arkhangelsk.

Thirteenth century

1222


Ivar Gacon, a warrior of the King of Norway from the Gulf, sailed at the mouth of the Northern

Dvina. On the way back his ship was wrecked at the entrance to the White Sea.

Fourteenth century

1302, 1320, 1323,

1349

The Belomorskiye armed forces performed sea voyages from the White Sea around the Kola



Peninsula to Norway.

Fifteenth century

1411

The sea campaign of the people from Dvina and Ustyug to Northern Norway, headed by



Posadnik (governor of medieval Russian city-state, appointed by prince or elected by citizens)

Yakov Stepanovich.

1412

The sea raid of Russian armed forces from the Dvina land to Northern Norway.



1419

The Norwegians sent to the White Sea a squad, which plundered and ravaged the villages in the

deltas of the Varzuga, the Onega, and the Northern Dvina. During the repulse of the attack two

Norwegian ships were captured.

The

first voyage of the White Sea industrialists to Novaya Zemlya.



(continued)

# Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2017

I.S. Zonn et al., The Western Arctic Seas Encyclopedia, Encyclopedia of Seas,

DOI 10.1007/978-3-319-25582-8

475


1427

The White Sea is depicted as the Gulf of the Arctic Ocean on the map of Claudius Klavusa.

1435

The monk Zosima founded the Solovetsky Monastery on the Solovetsky Islands.



1445

The attack of the Norwegian troops from the sea at the mouth of the Northern Dvina.

1491

In Varzuga, a large village of the Pomors, the temple of Nicholas of Myra (popularly called



Nicholas Pomor, the patron saint of seafarers) was built.

1494


The voyage of the Moscow Ambassadors D. Zaitsev and D. Grek from Denmark around the

Scandinavian Peninsula to the White Sea.

1496

The voyage of Moscow Ambassador G. Istoma on four ladyas (boats) from Novgorod to



Copenhagen via Velikiy Ustyug, the White Sea and the Arctic Ocean around the Scandinavian

Peninsula to the City of Trondheim (Norway), as a result of which the navigation (as de

fined by

Academician B. A. Rybakova) description



“Sailing in the Arctic Ocean” was made.

The sea campaign of the people from Dvina and Ustyug to Northern Norway under the

command of the governors of Moscow Ivan Lyapun and Peter Ushatyy.

1497


The voyage of the diplomats from Moscow, Dmitry Zaitsev and mates, from Copenhagen to

the mouth of the Northern Dvina.

1500

–1501


The voyage of the envoys of Ivan III, Tretyak Dalmatov, and Yuri Manuylov Grek, from the

Northern Dvina to Denmark.

Sixteenth century

1517


The farmers of Antonevo-Siysk Monastery in the lower reaches of the Northern Dvina,

Terentiy and Grigoriy Tsivil

ёvs, Fedor and Nazar Timofeyevs made a routine trip to the Ob on

their kocha (boat).

The map by S.Gerbershteyn was printed. It was the

first to include the Solovki (Solovetsky

Islands).

1532


The Bavarian scientist Jacob Ziegler compiled the

“Eighth Map, Containing the Skandinavsky

Peninsula and the Most Powerful Kingdom of Norway, Sweden, Gothia, Finland, as well as the

Area Inhabited by the Lapps.

1550


The construction of the Kola stockade town.

1553


The

first English expedition went into the Arctic Ocean to search for the Northeast Passage to

India. The expedition consisted of three ships under the command of H. Willoughby. Around

the coast of Norway the squad was divided. H. Willoughby with two ships went to the shores of

the islands of Novaya Zemlya, but he died at the Murmansk coast. The commander of the third

vessel, Edward Bonaventure, Richard Chancellor, passing along the Murmansk coast entered

the White Sea and reached the mouth of the Northern Dvina River, arriving at Arkhangelsk.

Then he went to Moscow, where he met with the Tsar of Russia, Ivan Vasilyevich IV the

Terrible.

1554


The agreement on the trade of the Moscow State with England, through the White Sea, was

signed.


1555

The


first Russian pilot assistance at the mouth of the Northern Dvina River was set up.

The English merchant Richard Gray built in Kholmogory a rope manufactory, which became

the

first Russian factory.



1556

According to the materials of the English navigator, the

first among the Western Arctic

explorers, S. Barrow, a map of the Barents Sea was compiled.

The

“Society of Merchants and Prospectors” organized an expedition in London, headed by



R. Chensler, visiting the White Sea for the second time.

The Englishman Stephen Burrough, on a small ship Searchthrift, searching for the Northeast

Passage to China and India, arrived in Kholmogory, where he wintered.

1555


–1557

The magnetic variation at the mouth of the Pechora River, the islands of Novaya Zemlya,

Vaygach Island and in the village of Kholmogory was de

fined.


1557

The English merchant and captain A. Jenkinson came to Novye Kholmogory.

1564

A Danish expedition tried to go to China via the Arctic from Iceland, went to the Novaya



Zemlya, but had to return due to the heavy ice. The description of it was given by Dietmar

Blefken, a member of the expedition.

1565

The Dutch established a trading station in Kola.



The Dutchman Oliver Brunel performed a voyage from Kola to Kholmogory, on a

Russian ship.

(continued)

476


Chronology of the Key Historical Events on the Western Seas of the Russian Arctic

1569

–1594


G. Mercator

’s map, which depicts the White Sea, but neither the Onega Bay nor the Kanin Nos

Peninsula, was published.

1570


The Dutch merchant Simon Van Salingen went through all the bays and harbors of the White

Sea coast and conducted the

first hydrographic surveys in Murman (between the Kola Bay and

Svyatoy Nos).

The beginning of the construction of ships in the Vologda Region for the White Sea and Baltic

Sea under the direction of the Moscow Tsar Ivan IV.

1572

The


first buildings of the Pomors appeared at the confluence of the Osetrovka and the Taz

Rivers.


1576

The Russian vessel under the direction of O. Brunel went from the Pechora Delta to the Ob via the

Yugorskiy Shar.

1577


The

first Dutch vessel came to the mouth of the Northern Dvina.

1578

A fortress was built in Kem.



1580

A British expedition of two small vessels, George (40 t) and William (20 t), under the command

of Arthur Pet and Charles Jackman, got into the Kara Sea (the

first British to do that). The ship

William vanished on the way back. The description of this voyage was found in 1875 in the Ice

Harbor on the Novaya Zemlya, in the form of a manuscript.

1583

Russian Tsar Ivan IV the Terrible issued a special charter ordering the magistrates Peter



Naschokov and Nikifor Zaleshanin to

find a port city “at the Dvina River,” near the Archangel

Monastery, 42 versts (an old Russian measure of distance equal to 3500 feet or 1.067 km) from

the White Sea.

1584

The voyage of the Dutch O. Brunel to the Novaya Zemlya. His ship was wrecked in the



Sangeyskiy Shar (Pechora).

The Dutch Simon Van Salingen arrived at Kola as a diplomatic representative of the Danish

King Frederick II, whom he promised to compile a sea map.

The


first Russian commercial Port of Novye Kholmogory was built (Novokholmogory – the

future Arkhangelsk).

1585

According to the Tsar



’s decree, Arkhangelsk became the only city where foreigners could buy

goods from the interior regions of the country.

1587

Frencis Cherry, an agent of the British trading company in Moscow, said that



“there is the

Warm Sea behind the Ob.

1590


–1592

The attack of the Swedish armed forces at Pomorje and Kola. Kola was burnt down.

1591

“Navigation Guidelines” by the Dutchman Luke Wagener was compiled, based on the data of



the Pomorian survey of the White and Barents Seas.

The Dutch merchant Simon Van Salingen published his essay

“On the Lopii Land,” in which

he described his journey in the White Sea in the 1570s.

1594

The


first Dutch expedition of W. Barents with the objective of finding a sea route to the Pacific

Ocean through the Arctic waters. The expedition of two ships under his command reached the

west coast of Novaya Zemlya. Five hundred kilometer of its coastline, Admiralteystva Island

and a group of small islands of Oranskiye were mapped for the

first time.

The Dutch merchant ship Swan, under the command of Cornelis Nay, came into the Kara Sea

(they called it the New North Sea then).

1595


The Tyavzinsky Agreement between Sweden and Russia was signed. Under the agreement,

Sweden took the obligation not to attack the Kola stockade; the collection of tribute from the

Lapps was prohibited until the

final demarcation of areas in Lapland.

The second Dutch expedition of W. Barents, who performed the duties of Chief Navigator and

Captain of one of the seven ships. The expedition managed to reach the Strait of Yugorskiy

Shar and get to the Kara Sea for a short distance. The

first description of Vaygach Island was

given.

1596


–1597

The third Dutch expedition of W. Barents, which reached Spitsbergen Island, where the traces of

frequent visits of Russian sailors to the Archipelago were discovered, as well as the Archipelago of

Novaya Zemlya, where in the Ice Harbor of the Kara Sea, on the west coast of the North Island of

Novaya Zemlya W. Barents wintered and later died.

The map of the Barents Sea from the North Cape to the Novaya Zemlya, composed by the

Dutchman Gerrit de Veer, a member of the expedition of W. Barents to Novaya Zemlya, was

published.

(continued)

Chronology of the Key Historical Events on the Western Seas of the Russian Arctic

477


1598

The map of the Arctic countries by W. Barents was published in Amsterdam.

The book by Gerrit de Veer Voyages of Barents was published (translated into Russian

in 1936).

1599

The Duma scribe (a government of



ficial in Russia in the fourteenth–seventeenth centuries)

Vlasyev brought to Arkhangelsk two ships with the crew (navigators, sailors, masters), built by

the order of Tsar Boris Godunov at the shipyards of Lubeck in Germany.

16th century (at the

end)

The appearance of the



first Pomorian handwritten navigation directions. The first “Big Plans”

“around the Muscovy, to all the surrounding states” were represented in the Razryadny Prikaz,

with the scale of about 1:1,850,000.

The Atlas of J. Van Keulen was published in Dutch in Amsterdam, it was known as the

“See-

torch.


” The atlas shows the first map of the White Sea, compiled from the words of the Russian

Pomorians. It was used until the middle of the eighteenth century. From this map in 1701 in

Moscow A. Schonebeck etched the

first maps of the White Sea in Russian.

Seventeenth century

1601


The Dutch Simon Van Salingen made a map of Scandinavia.

1602


The

first Russian shipyard was founded in Arkhangelsk.

1604

The


first vessel from Hamburg arrived at the mouth of the Northern Dvina.

1607


Mangazeysky service class people came to the mouth of the Yenisei.

1608


–1609

The expedition equipped by the East India Company, led by G. Hudson, which had the

objective of

finding a sea passage to China, reached the Novaya Zemlya.

1609

A map of the north of Russia and Siberia, which featured the deltas of the Yenisei, Pyasina, and



the coast of the Gydan Peninsula, was compiled in Moscow.

1610


A group of traders from Dvina, headed by Kondratiy Kurochkin and Osip Shepunov sailed on

kochas to the mouths of the Yenisei and Pyasina.

1612

The Dutch merchant Isaac Massa described the Russian march to the coast of Taymyr in 1605.



1613

Great Britain announced Spitsbergen (Svalbard) its own territory, giving it the name of

“The

New Earth of King James.



The marine campaign of Shestak Ivanov from Mezen who sailed from Mangazeya to

Arkhangelsk.

The units of Polish-Lithuanian invaders came to Kolmogory (Kholmogory), stayed there for

3 days, and then left for the Korelskiy Monastery of St. Nicholas (now the territory of

Severomorsk).

The country

’s first Pilot Service was organized in Arkhangelsk.

1616

–1619


Archers from Mangazeya surveyed the coastline between the rivers of Kara and Yenisei.

1619


The decree of Russian Tsar Mikhail Fedorovich banning the

“Mangazeysky voyage (from

Pomorje to Mangazeya) under penalty of death.

The Yenisei Province was created.



1627

The book To the Big Draft, which included

“The Sea Rivers, Painting the Shore of the Arctic

Ocean


” was compiled in Moscow.

1629


Erofei Khabarov Taymyr from Ustyug made a trip from Mangazeya to Taimyr.

1651


–1652

The expedition to search for silver ore on the Novaya Zemlya, headed by Roman Neplyuev.

1653

The royal decree allowing the farmer from the Arkhangelsk Province I. Khobarov pilot to



Arkhangelsk and take to sea

“trade ships of different lands,” which was the beginning of the

creation of the sea pilot service in Russia.

1667


The Tobolsk governor P. Godunov ordered to stop sailing to Mangazeya through the Gulfs of

Ob and Taz.

1671

Ivan Neklyudov sailed to the Novaya Zemlya in order to search for silver ores.



1672

The second attempt of Ivan Neklyudov to reach the Novaya Zemlya in order to search for

silver ores.

1676


The voyage of the English captain John Wood to the Novaya Zemlya.

1686


The tradesman from Turukhansk Ivan Tolstoukhov tried to sail on three kochas from the Yenisei

River along the western coast of Taymyr in order to reach the mouth of the Lena. He died near

Faddey Island.

(continued)

478

Chronology of the Key Historical Events on the Western Seas of the Russian Arctic



1690

The expedition ship of Rodion Ivanov was wrecked at the Sharapovy Koshki Islands off the

west coast of the Yamal Peninsula. The wintering of 15 manufacturers, four of which survived,

including R. Ivanov, who gave a description of the Sharapovy Koshki Islands.

1693

The


first trip to Arkhangelsk and the voyage of Russian Tsar Peter I in the White Sea on the

12-gun-boat Svyatoy Petr (Saint Peter). The

first Russian “new manner” marine vessel – the

12-gun ship Apostol Pavel (St. Paul), with the length of 26.2 m, the width of 6.7 m excluding

the sheathing, was laid in Arkhangelsk, thus initiating state shipbuilding in Russia.

F.M. Apraksin accompanied Peter I to Arkhangelsk, was appointed Voivode of Dvinsk and

Governor of Arkhangelsk, and supervised the construction of the

first merchant ship in

Solombala.

Peter I founded the

first Russian state-owned enterprise “Solombalskaya Shipyard.”

Peter I visited Kholmogory.

1694

The ship, ordered by Peter I with the assistance of the Dutch cartographer N. Witsen, was



delivered to Arkhangelsk.

The second trip to Arkhangelsk and a voyage of Peter I in the White Sea with a group of three

ships. The

first map of the Solovetsky Islands was presumably compiled at this time.

Peter I participated in the ceremonial launching of the

first Russian merchant ship Apostol

Pavel.

Eighteenth century



18th century, the

beginning

The

first in the northern seas beacon building – a wooden tower was built on Mudyug Island in



the White Sea.

1701


The Novodvinsk fortress was laid on the island of Linsky Priluk in the Berezov mouth of the

Northern Dvina.

The engraver from Holland Adriaan Schoonebeek etched:

“The Draft of the River of Dvina or

Arkhangelskaya,

” “The Dimensional Map, Starting from the Narrow Aisle Between the

Russian and White Seas,

” and “The Dimensional Map from Pyalitsa Even to Kovada

According to the Best Test.

A failed attempt of the Swedish squadron of Vice-Admiral Sheblat (seven two-mast ships) to



make a landing at the mouth of the Northern Dvina River near Novodvinskaya fortress with the

objective to destroy Arkhangelsk, its shipyards, and ships. The squadron was met by the

fire of

the battery under Colonel Zhivotovsky. Two ships were sunk.



1702

Vice-Admiral K.I. Kryuys was sent by Peter I to Arkhangelsk, where he led the construction of

the ships and forti

fications in Arkhangelsk. He was the creator of the military port.

The Russian squadron under his command took the Noteburg fortress.

The third trip of Peter I to Arkhangelsk and founding the Novodvinskaya fortress according to

his directions.

Peter I ordered to lay in Solombala two small frigates Svyatoy Dukh (Holy Spirit) and Kuryer

(Courier), which were launched in the presence of the Tsar. From Arkhangelsk the frigates

came to the Nyukhcha pier, Karelia at the White Sea, and then they were dragged 160 miles to

Lake Onega.

1703


–1704

The creation of marine animal and whale hunting company of Duke Menshikov and the

Sha

firov brothers.



1705

The


first warning marks (“pilot-barrels”) were set in the fairway of the Northern Dvina River.

1711


The Dutch traveler and painter Bruin published the book Cornelia de Bruin

’s Journey Through

Muscovy, 1701, 1708.

1714


F.S. Saltytkov, a well-known

figure of the Petrine Era, presented to Tsar Peter I the project “On

the Search for the Free Marine Path from the Dvina River, even to the Amur Mouth and

China.


Peter I approved of the proposal of F.S. Saltykov concerning the feasibility of the development

of the northern border regions of Russia.

1715


The termination of the military shipbuilding in Arkhangelsk.

1720


–1721

Setting up the expedition with the participation of P. Chichagov, a land surveyor and Miller, a

merchant, with the objective to

find a marine pass from the Ob mouth to the east.

(continued)

Chronology of the Key Historical Events on the Western Seas of the Russian Arctic

479


1722

By a decree of Peter I all the foreign trade was relocated from Arkhangelsk to the banks of the

Neva in St.-Petersburg.

1723


–1724

The foundation of the

“Kola whaling” company.

1723


–1725

Trade voyages of the Bazhenins

’ galiot from Arkhangelsk to the Pechora, headed by the

helmsman Andrei Shnyarov.

1727

Three vessels of



“Kola whaling” first hunted the whale in the waters of Spitsbergen (Svalbard).

The French astronomer Ludwig (Luis) De L

’Isle de la Croyère (De L’Isle Nikolay Iosifovich),

who was invited to Russia by St.-Petersburg Academy of Sciences, started the cartographic

work in the Arkhangelogorodskaya Province, which lasted for 3 years. He determined the

coordinates of Arkhangelsk. Due to the imperfection of the instruments and methods of

calculating of that time, the longitude was determined with an accuracy of 2



.



The publication of the decree for permission to conduct foreign trade through Arkhangelsk.

1727


–1798

A number of inspections and marine reconnaissance inventory of the White Sea were made by

the sailors of the Russian

fleet Deoper, Kazakov, Bestuzhev, Belyaev, M. Nemtinov,

Grigorkov, Domozhirov, Yarovtsev, I. Fedorov, Tokmachev.

1729


A handwritten copy of the map of the Solovetsky Islands was made from the original,

composed by an anonymous inventory and being the

first known Russian map of the White

Sea. The map showed the outlines of Solovetsky and Anzer Islands, the settlement of the

Solovetsky Monastery and, also, presented a rare coastal survey.



Download 0.66 Mb.

Do'stlaringiz bilan baham:
  1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   10




Ma'lumotlar bazasi mualliflik huquqi bilan himoyalangan ©fayllar.org 2020
ma'muriyatiga murojaat qiling