Chronology of the Key Historical Events on the Western Seas of the Russian Arctic


Download 0.66 Mb.
Pdf ko'rish
bet2/10
Sana10.01.2019
Hajmi0.66 Mb.
1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   10

Training sailing of vessels to Arkhangelsk and back under the command of D.I. Kalmykov. It

was attended by the future Admiral, A.I. Nagaev.

1732


Empress Anna Ivanovna signed a decree on the administration of the second Kamchatka

expedition, led by Captain-Commander Vitus Bering (the First Academic or the Great

Northern Expedition)

1733


The

first Dvina-Ob party of the Great Northern Expedition (1733–1743), with the objective to

develop a sea route from the Northern Dvina to Ob, departed from Arkhangelsk. The northern

sailors of the Kormakulovs built for the party two koches, Expeditsion and Ob. The

detachment, led by Lieutenant S.V. Muravyev and M.S. Pavlov, and (since 1736)

S. G. Malygin (1700

–1764), the latter received for the expedition two more boats, built in

Arkhangelsk.

The Admiralty established in the Admiralty Nautical School in Arkhangelsk.

1733


–1743

The research of the Great Northern Expedition.

1734

The beginning of the observations of the opening and freezing of the Northern Dvina River.



Two koches, Expeditsion and Ob, under the command of lieutenants and S.V. Muravyev and

M.S. Pavlov, left the mouth of the Northern Dvina to make the inventory of the coastline from

Arkhangelsk to the mouth of the Ob River.

1734


–1736

The unsuccessful operation of the

first party of the Kara-Ob Great Northern Expedition, under

the command of lieutenants S.V. Muravyev and M.S. Pavlov, on special vessels Expeditsion

and Ob into the Kara Sea. Wintering in the area of the Pechora. A survey of Vaygach Island was

carried out. The second wintering at the mouth of the Pechora River. Both of the lieutenants

were recalled to St.-Petersburg, tried and demoted to sailors due to

“numerous lazy and silly

acts.



1736



–1737

The Dvina-Ob party of the Great Northern Expedition, under the command of S.G. Malygin

and A. Skuratov,

finished the inventory of the coastline from the White Sea to the

Northernmost point of Yamal and found a passage from the sea in the Gulf of Ob.

1736


Lieutenant S.G. Malygin was appointed the new head of the Kara-Ob party.

1737


The expedition ship of the Ob and Yenisei party, under the command of D. M. Ovtsyn, after

4-year-long attempts passed from the Gulf of Ob to the Yenisei.

S.G. Malygin carried out the inventory of the Yamal Peninsula and the Gulf of Ob.

1738


–1739

The vessels of the Dvina-Ob party, under the command of S.G. Malygin made (with one

enforced wintering) the return voyage from Berezov, at the Ob, to Arkhangelsk.

1738


–1740

The voyage of Obi-Pochtalyon boat, commanded by F.A. Minin and overland trips of

Sterlegov to the east of the Yenisei.

(continued)

480

Chronology of the Key Historical Events on the Western Seas of the Russian Arctic



1740

The gukor Kronshlot, under the command of V. Vinkov, made the transition from Kronstadt to

Arkhangelsk, delivering artillery equipment.

F.I. Soymonov compiled the General Map of the White Sea (not published).

1741

–1742


The Lena-Khatanga party of the Great Northern Expedition carried out the overland work on

the inventory of the coast of the Taymyr Peninsula. During these operations the navigator

Chelyuskin reached the northernmost point of the Eurasian continent

– Cape Chelyuskin.

1741

Lieutenant V. Vinkov was sent to Kola to make an inventory of the Kola Bay.



The chief navigator E. Bestuzhev described the west coast of the Kanin Peninsula, Lieutenant

Sukhotin surveyed the White Sea coast from Arkhangelsk to Mezen and the coast of the Kanin

Nos Peninsula to Cape Kanin Nos.

1741


–1742

Lieutenant V. Vinkov conducted the

first Russian reconnaissance inventory of the Murmansk

coast in the vicinity of the Kola Bay from Kildin Island.

The Russian military squadron sailed on the cruiser along the coasts of the Kola Peninsula and

Northern Norway.

Ekaterininskaya (Catherine) harbor was founded in the Kola Bay.

1743


Admiral S.I. Mordvinov was appointed Captain of the Port of Arkhangelsk.

1743


–1749

The 6-year-wintering on Spitsbergen (Svalbard) of four

fishermen from Mezen: Ivan and

Alexey Khimkovs, Stepan Shchipachev, and Fedor Verigin.

1744

S.I. Mordvinov, who commanded Poltava battleship, built in Arkhangelsk for the Baltic Fleet,



transferred it to Kronstadt.

1745


The Academy of Sciences published a map of the Russian Lapland, the

first map of the Kola

Peninsula, compiled on a mathematical basis. It was included in the Atlas of the Russian

Empire.


1746

–1747


Surveys in the White Sea, under the leadership of Zhidovinov and Ivanov.

1749


The ship Varahail capsized and sank in the White Sea while exiting the mouth of the Northern

Dvina. Twenty-eight members of the crew died (the commander M.P. Shpanberg).

1750

The guard ship service for Customs inspection and maintenance of foreign ships to Kola was



organized in the Kola Bay.

1753


The Senate lifted the ban of 1704 thus allowing free navigation from Pomorje to the rivers of

Ob and Taz.

1756

–1757


The navigators Belyaev and Tolmachev, within the expedition of the Admiralty Board,

conducted the survey of the Winter Coast from Arkhangelsk to Mezen and the east coast

of the Mezensky Peninsula to Cape Kopushin.

1760


S. Lozhkin, a helmsman from Olonetsk, went to the eastern shores of Novaya Zemlya through

the Strait of Karskiye Vorota (Kara Gate). After two winterings he rounded it from the north

and arrived back in Arkhangelsk from the western side. Thus, S. Lozhkin was

first to prove that

Novaya Zemlya is an island

1761


The

first information about private pilots from the Onega Bay who steered vessels to sawmills

in the village of Soroka and the towns of Onega and Mezen.

1763


Mikhail Lomonosov presented to the Swedish Academy of Sciences his work

“Thoughts on

the Origin of Icy Mountains in the Northern Seas.

1764



A map of the Gulf of Klokbay on Spitsbergen (Svalbard) was compiled.

A squad of polar explorers, under the command of Lieutenant M. S. Nemtinov, went from

Arkhangelsk to the Spitsbergen Archipelago on the

“pinka”-boat Slon and “gukor”-boats St.

John, St. Dionysius, St. Nikolai, and Natalia with the objective to organize the base for the

expedition of V.Ya. Chichagov. According to the results of the voyage, a map of the

archipelago was made.

1765


On the initiative of M.V. Lomonosov, supported by the Admiralty Board, the

first high polar

expedition (the ships Chichagov, Panov, and Babaev), under the command of V.Ya.

Chichagov, was sent with the task of

finding a sea route to the west of Arkhangelsk, across the

Arctic Ocean to the shores of North America. Due to the severe ice conditions two attempts of

the ship to go beyond the Svalbard Archipelago failed and it returned to Arkhangelsk in 1766.

1765


–1769

The


first Russian sea expedition to the Barents Sea, financed by the Russian Government.

(continued)

Chronology of the Key Historical Events on the Western Seas of the Russian Arctic

481


1766

The helmsmen from Arkhangelsk Ya. Chirakin allegedly

“again” rediscovered the strait,

known as the Matochkin Shar nowadays (has been known since the sixteenth century). He

went through the Matochkin Shar Strait from the west to the east, to the Kara Sea and made a

plan of the strait.

A small book Adventure of Four Russian Sailors to the Island of Ost-Spitsbergen, Who Were

Brought by a Storm, written by Peter Ludwig-Leroy, was published.

1768

–1769


The expedition to Novaya Zemlya, headed by Fedor Rozmyslov, surveyed and mapped the

Strait of Matochkin Shar.

1769

The


first at the White Sea capital lighthouse (wooden), Zhizhgin was built.

Lieutenant M. Nemtinov continued work of Belyaev and Tolmachev, surveying the coast of

Letniy up to the Onega.

1770


The

first realistic map of the White Sea, created based on the Russian inventories by E. Bestuzhev,

Belyaev, M. Nemtinov, and Dutch maps was produced. It was used in manuscript form until 1778.

The map was

“flat,” the scale of about 1: 640,000.

1772


The member of St.-Petersburg Academy of Sciences, I.I. Lepekhin toured various provinces of

Russia, including a visit to the Arkhangelsk Province within the expedition of the Academy of

Sciences on the study and scienti

fic description of the little-known outlying areas of Russian

Empire.

1773


Surveys and inventories in the White Sea and the coast of Lapland under the guidance of

D. A. Domozhirov and P. I. Grigorkov.

1774

“Mercator Map, Which Contains the White Sea and Part of the Arctic Ocean from Arkhangelsk



to Cape Skagen in Jutland, with Parts of Novaya Zemlya, Greenland, Iceland and Scotland,

Made Exactly Against the Ordinary Dutch Map, Hitherto Consumed by Navigators

” was

engraved in the Marine Cadet Corps for the Gentry. Despite the enormous disadvantages, it



was the only map of North coast of Russia, engraved in Russian, for more than 20 years,

although there also were more accurate data, obtained by Russian sailors, at that time.

1777

Lieutenant Commander V.E. Pustorzhevtsev performed reconnaissance marine inventory of



the Onega Bay of the White Sea, detailing the rivers

flowing into the bay from the west, and the

offshore islands.

1778


–1779

Lieutenants P.I. Grigorkov and D.A. Domozhirov conducted the reconnaissance and maritime

inventory of the Terskiy Coast of the White Sea.

1779


The campaign of the military squadron, under the command of Rear Admiral Khmetevskiy,

from Arkhangelsk to the Norwegian Sea. Hydrographic work in the Barents and Norwegian

Seas was carried out.

1781


The decree of the Senate on the establishment of the

first Russian Naval School for training

navigators in Kholmogory.

1783


Lieutenants Babushkin and Neledinsky surveyed and measured the mouth of the Northern

Dvina.


1785

By the order of Empress Catherine II, an expedition, under the command of Lieutenant-

Commander I. Billings, was organized, with the objective to inventory the northern seas and

their coasts.

1786

The Naval School was transferred from Kholmogory to Arkhangelsk.



1787

V.V. Krestinin, a historian from Arkhangelsk, wrote

“News of the White Sea Herring Fishery.”

1797


The researcher from Arkhangelsk A.I. Fomin published

“Description of the White Sea,” to

which a map of the central part of the sea and the plan of the Solovetsky Monastery were

enclosed.

L.I. Golenischev-Kutuzov led an expedition on the inventory of the White Sea.

1798


Inventory and measurements in the Kandalaksha Bay under the leadership L.I. Golenischev-

Kutuzov were conducted.

(continued)

482


Chronology of the Key Historical Events on the Western Seas of the Russian Arctic

1798

–1801


The

first Russian naval reconnaissance inventory of the White Sea, under the leadership of

L.I. Golenischev-Kutuzov, was made. Upon the completion of the works L.I. Golenischev-

Kutuzov compiled a general map of the sea, which was engraved in 1806. Following the

issuance of the map, signi

ficant discrepancies were detected, mainly due to the errors in

determining the coordinates of points, up to 1



. As a result, the eastern shore was relocated one



degree to the east, and the sea was shown much wider than it really is, but the card was used up

to 1823.


1800

The beginning of meteorological observations in Arkhangelsk.

L.I. Golenischev-Kutuzov published the

first atlas for sailing from the White Sea to the Baltic

Sea.

Nineteenth century



1805

L.I. Golenischev-Kutuzov compiled

“Atlas of the White Sea.”

1806


–1807

The expedition, led by V. Ludlov, on the tender-ship Pchela (Bee) to the Novaya Zemlya in

search of silver ores. The navigator of the expedition, G. Pospelov made a map of the Novaya

Zemlya coast from the Kostin Shar to the Matochkin Shar.

1806

The map of the White Sea, compiled in the Mercator projection with the poles compression,



under the direction of of L.I. Golenischev-Kutuzov following the research of 1798

–1801 was

published.

1807


By the Decree of Alexander I in response to the request of the Danish Government, the

exception was made from the Decree of 1806 on the export of grain from the ports of the

Arkhangelsk Region for the residents of Norway.

1809


English warships attacked Pomorje, the base of the White Sea Fishing Company in

Ekaterininskaya (Catherine

’s) Harbor and burned the town of Kola on the Barents Sea coast of

the Kola Peninsula. An English frigate destroyed

fisheries near Kola and captured several

trading schooners. The warships of Port Arkhangelsk failed to detect the invaders and resist the

attack.

1810


The English captured the navigator Gerasimov

’s ship at sea near the North Cape. On the way to

England Russian sailors disarmed the guards, seized the ship back and returned to Kola.

1811


The classic research of Academician P.S. Pallas

“Zoogeographia Russo-Asiatica” was

published. The list of all known species of

fish at the time in Russia, including the fish of the

White Sea, was given in the third volume of it.

1817


The Atlas of the White Sea, compiled under the direction of L.I. Golenischev-Kutuzov was

issued.


The Senate granted the Russian manufacturer K.N. Berd, who initiated the construction of

steamships in Russia, the right for monopolistic organization of steam navigation on the White,

Baltic, Black, Caspian, and Azov Seas.

1818


An unlit leading lighthouse was built on Mudyug Island.

1819


The Russian Minister of Marine I.I. De Traverse sent a letter to the Commander of Port

Arkhangelsk, Rear Admiral A.F. Klokachev about his intention of sending a ship to explore

Novaya Zemlya.

The attempt of the expedition on the brig Novaya Zemlya, under the command of A.P. Lazarev,

to bypass Novaya Zemlya from the north failed due to severe ice conditions.

The Emperor Alexander I visited Arkhangelsk and visited the Novodvinskaya fortress on

Kegostrov. In his presence in the Solombalskaya shipyard, the 74-gun ship Tri Svyatitelya and

the 44-gun frigate Patrikiy were launched, and the new frigate Mercuriy was laid.

1820

Lieutenant F.P. Litke departed from Arkhangelsk on the brig Novaya Zemlya to the expedition



to Novaya Zemlya Island. It lasted until mid-1821.

1821


I.N. Ivanov led an expedition to study the possibility of transporting ship timber from the Pechora

River to Arkhangelsk. He explored and described the eastern bank of the Pechora River from

Pustozersk to its mouth and then the coastline to the mouth of the Chernaya River.

An identi

fication tower was built on Cape Pulongsky Nose.

1821


–1824

A 4-year expedition to Novaya Zemlya headed by F.P. Litke on the brig Novaya Zemlya

compiled the maps of the western and southern coasts of Novaya Zemlya and the Matochkin

Shar Strait.

(continued)

Chronology of the Key Historical Events on the Western Seas of the Russian Arctic

483


1822

The second expedition to Novaya Zemlya by F.P. Litke. The observations of part of the White

and Barents Seas

– the Lapland and the Murmansk coasts from Cape Svyatoy Nos to the mouth

of the Kola River and the raids and the harbor were described.

The Kola expedition, led by M.F. Reinecke, departed from Arkhangelsk. During the

navigation, it carried out a detailed survey of the Murmansk coast from Kola to the border with

Norway, Kildin Island, the Kola Bay, the Rybachy Peninsula, the Tuloma, and Kola Rivers. It

also de

fined the bays and coves, where anchorages for military and commercial vessels could



be made.

An identi

fication base was built on Cape Orlov-Tersky.

1823


The work by F.P. Litke

“Fourfold Journey into the Arctic Ocean” was published.

1824

One of the units of F.P. Litke



’s expedition, under the command of Lieutenant D.A. Demidov,

was assigned to carry out depth soundings and reconnaissance marine inventory in the White

Sea, which was implemented.

Lieutenant M.F. Reinecke on the brig Kathy made a survey of the northeastern part of the

White Sea.

1824


–1828

The navigators I.N. Ivanov and N.M. Ragozin conducted the inventory of the Kara Sea coast

from the Pechora to Yamal.

1825


The

first steamboat Legkiy with the machine of 60 hp was built in Arkhangelsk.

1825

–1827


The assistant navigator I.A. Berezhnykh conducted the maritime reconnaissance inventory of

the White Sea coast between the Pechora River and Kanin Nos.

1826

The general map of the Murmansk coast, based on the works of F.P. Litke, M.F. Reinecke et al.,



was published.

The atlas of the maps of the White Sea together with the Onega and Kandalaksha Bays,

compiled under the direction of L.I. Golenischev-Kutuzov, was published.

The linear 74-gun ship Azov was launched in Arkhangelsk. Later it fought heroically in the

Turkish fortress of Navarin and was

first in the history of the Russian Navy to receive St

George

’s stern flag and a pennant.



1825

–1905


A series of marine reconnaissance inventories of the Murmansk coast were carried out, under

the leadership of M.F. Reinecke (1825, 1832), N.M. Deploranskiy (1888

–1889),

M.E. Zhdanko (1893



–1894), A.I. Vilkitskiy (1899–1901), A.M. Bukhteev, and

G.S. Maksimov (1903

–1904).

1826


–1829

The hydrographic expedition, led by I.N. Ivanov, described and mapped the coast of the

Pechora and Kanin Nos to the Ob.

1827


The navigator I.N. Ivanov sailed from Obdorsk to the northeast cape of the Yamal Peninsula,

de

fining its astronomical position.



A.L. Yunker, on the schooner

№2, conducted an inventory of the White Sea.

M.F. Reinecke was

first in Russia to carry out the observations of the sea level fluctuations in

the open part of the Gorlo Strait and the Voronka area of the White Sea.

The member of the Decembrist movement A.M. Ivanchin-Pisarev participated in the inventory

of the islands of Morzhovets and Sosnovets, the Tri Islands, and the Iokangskiye Islands.

1827


–1832

The Belomorskaya (White Sea) expedition, led by M.F. Reinecke, on the brig Lapominka and

two schooners, carried out the reconnaissance survey of the White Sea in order to verify and

update the maps and atlas by L.I. Golenischev-Kutuzov. Observations of tides and currents

were conducted in many places; meteorological observations were carried out; the gravity was

determined in Arkhangelsk and Kandalaksha. The surveys resulted in a new atlas of the White

Sea and its detailed hydrographic description.

1828


M.F. Reinecke built an unlit tower on Cape Svyatoy Nos.

1830


M.F. Reinecke carried out the

first pendulum determinations of the acceleration of gravity in

the village of Kandalaksha on the White Sea shore.

1831


The Atlas of the White Sea, containing the data of the research of M.F. Reinecke

’s expedition

(1827

–1831), as well as the data, collected earlier. The new atlas of the sea consisted of two



sheets of the general map with the scale of approx. 1:650,000, 10 paticular maps with the scale

of 1:200,000, and a number of plans. All the maps were made in the Mercator projection.

(continued)

484


Chronology of the Key Historical Events on the Western Seas of the Russian Arctic

1832

The expedition, led by Peter Kuzmich Pakhtusov (1800

–1835), left from Arkhangelsk to the

Novaya Zemlya on the boat Novaya Zemlya. The boat had been built by the draft of

P.K. Pakhtusov, with the participation of the shipmaster V.L. Ershov. The expedition ended in

1833, having produced the description of the eastern and southern coasts of the southern island

of the Novaya Zemlya.

The second expedition, led by P.K. Pakhtusov, departed from Arkhangelsk to the Novaya

Zemlya on the schooner Krotov and the karbass Kazakov. The karbase Kazakov was

commanded by A.K. Tsivolka, who subsequently continued the work of Pakhtusov. On

7 October 1835 P.K. Pakhtusov returned to Arkhangelsk, got seriously ill and died on

19 November 1835.

1832

–1833


The expedition to the Novaya Zemlya on the ship Novaya Zemlya under the command of

P.K. Pakhtusov and the schooner Yenisei under the command Krotov undertook a voyage from

the Kara Gate to the north along the east coast and through the Matochkin Shar Strait went to

the western shore. The schooner Yenisei sank with all the crew. For the

first time in history

South Island had been completely bypassed.

1832

–1887


A number of reconnaissance marine surveys were conducted in some areas of the White Sea,

including the annual measurements of the main bar of the Northern Dvina River.

1833

–1834


“Atlas of the White Sea and the Coast of Lapland,” compiled by M.F. Reinecke, was published.

1834


The

first scientific expedition of St.-Petersburg’s Academy of Sciences, under the leadership of

the Academician K.M. Baer (1792

–1876), set off from the piers of Port Arkhangelsk. The

purpose of the expedition was a historical study of the island (by no means, comprehensive).



Download 0.66 Mb.

Do'stlaringiz bilan baham:
1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   10




Ma'lumotlar bazasi mualliflik huquqi bilan himoyalangan ©fayllar.org 2020
ma'muriyatiga murojaat qiling