Chronology of the Key Historical Events on the Western Seas of the Russian Arctic


Download 0.66 Mb.
Pdf ko'rish
bet3/10
Sana10.01.2019
Hajmi0.66 Mb.
1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   10

The expedition performed a great set of works

– on zoology, botany, geology, meteorology,

ethnography. In late September, they returned to Arkhangelsk.

1834

–1835


The second hydrographic expedition on the ships Krotov and Kazakov to Novaya Zemlya,

headed by P.K. Pahtusov and involving A.K. Tsivolka, to continue the inventory of the east

coast. The expedition wintered near the Matochkin Shar, which was mapped.

1837


The expedition on the ship Krotov, led by

К.M. Baer and involving A.K. Tsivolka, collected

zoological and botanical samples on the Novaya Zemlya.

1838


The expedition, led by August Karlovich Tsivolka, departed from Arkhangelsk on the newly

built there schooners Novaya Zemlya and Spitsbergen. The purpose of the expedition was to

study and map the northwest, northern, and northeast coasts of the Novaya Zemlya.

Spitsbergen was commanded by S.A. Moiseev, who became the

first assistant of

A.K. Tsivolka. In March 1839, Tsivolka died of scurvy. On 8 September 1839 the expedition

returned to Arkhangelsk. Its research results were transferred to the Academy of Sciences and

used to develop a new map of the islands.

1840

Alexander Fedorovich Middendorf traveled from Kola to Kandalaksha as a member of Baer



’s

expedition. The researcher examined the Ponoyskiy Coast, Kildin Island, the Vayda Bay, Kola,

from where he passed to Kandalaksha through Lapland; he also collected the data on

ornithology and malacology, as well as on the geology of Lapland.

The

first on the northern seas of Russia major stone lighthouse on Mudyug Island



(Mudyugskiy) was set in operation.

The expedition of R. Murchison, an English geologist, with the participation of the Russian

geologist A. A. Keyzerlig, surveyed the southern coast of the White Sea, the rivers of Pinega,

Northern Dvina, and others.

1841

The naval of



ficer Savelyev conducted the first three-component survey of the Earth’s magnetic

field on the White Sea.

1842

The trade campaign of I. Gvozdarev to the Novaya Zemlya (Barents Island).



The naval school in Arkhangelsk was converted into skippers

’ courses.

The

first of the built lighthouses, Tersko-Orlovskiy, Mordovetskiy, and Zhizhginskiy were set



in operation.

(continued)

Chronology of the Key Historical Events on the Western Seas of the Russian Arctic

485


1843

The


first Russian sailing directions along the Murmansk coast – “Hydrographic Description of

the Northern Coast of Russia, Volume II, Lapland coast,

” composed by M.F. Reinecke, were

issued. Reprinted in 1878.

The hydrographic expedition of P.I. Kruzenshtern to the Pechora River.

The position of Manager of the White Sea lighthouses was established in Port Arkhangelsk.

F.P. Litke published the maps of tides of the North Paci

fic Ocean, the Barents, and White Seas.

1848

The German meteorologist Dove suggested that the branch of the Atlantic Current enters the



Barents Sea and extends to the coast of the Novaya Zemlya.

1849


Commanding his own schooner Yermak, P.I. Kruzenshtern tried to pass from the White Sea to

the Kara Sea.

1850

The work by M.F. Reinecke



“Hydrographic description of the North Coast of Russia; Volume

I; The White Sea

” was published.

1851


The sailing of I. Gvozdarev on the schooner Gregoriy Bogoslov to the Blokbay Bay

(Spitsbergen) and his tragic death.

The creator of the

first general works on the history of Russian seafaring, A.P. Sokolov

published the paper

“Northern Expedition of 1733–1743.”

The Russian Academy of Sciences awarded M.F. Reinecke the full Demidov Prize for

“Atlas


of the White Sea

” and “Hydrographic description of the North Coast of Russia. Volume I and

II.



1853



The German scientist A. Petermann united the Murmansk and the Pechora Sea into a single

sea, called the Barents Sea in memory of the navigator W. Barents.

1854

Three British steam ships, which had a total of 57 guns and 560 crew members, entered the



White Sea. The vessels engaged in the production of measurements near the mouth of the

Dvina, in the robbery of the merchant ships and barges on their way, collecting food supplies,

small landings in those areas where there were no Russian troops and setting

fires there.

The attempt of an Anglo-French squadron of 10 ships to capture the Solovetsky Monastery.

For almost the whole day they bombed the monastery, but there were no killed or wounded in

the monastery as the result; the only building which was severely damaged was a guest house,

located outside the monastery.

Two French ships arrived in the White Sea in order to give an opportunity to their allies to

establish a though late, but actual blockade of the Russian shores.

1855

The


flagship of the English fleet, the 44-gun frigate Meander landed troops (about 60 people)

near the Kuzomen village of the Kola district. A squad of peasants, about 350 residents of

several villages, offered armed confrontation, resulting in the British retreating to their ship and

leaving for Arkhangelsk. In September of the same year the Morskoy Sbornik journal reported

the event under the heading

“Ports’ News.”

The attempt of the British to capture Kandalaksha was successfully repelled.

1856


Director of the Hydrographic Department Vice Admiral M.F. Reinecke prepared

“A report on

installing port meteorological observatories in Nikolaev, Arkhangelsk, and Kamchatka and

conducting meteorological observations on all the lighthouses of the seas.

1857


The essay of G. Kolmogorov

“On Maritime Trade of Siberia Directly with Western Europe”

was published.

The discussion of the draft by G. Kolmogorov on the construction of a port in the Strait of

Yugorskiy Shar.

1858


The Swedish polar explorer N. Nordenskjold discovered rich deposits of coal on Spistbergen

(Svalbard).

The Russian Emperor signed the charter of the

“Northern Dvina Steamship Company” – the

first steamship company on the Northern Dvina.

1859


The Siberian merchant M.K. Sidorov

filed a note to the Yenisei Governor on the possibility of

navigation from Europe to Siberia through the mouths of the Yenisei and the Ob.

1859


–1861

N.Ya. Danilevskiy and his party conducted comprehensive research in

fishery in the White

Sea, the Pechora River, and the Murman.

(continued)

486


Chronology of the Key Historical Events on the Western Seas of the Russian Arctic

1860

The law was adopted, according to which the Norwegians were allowed to settle in the former

Kola district with the adoption of the Russian citizenship and exemption from payment of state

taxes and conscription.

Lieutenant P.P. Kruzenshtern (a grandson of a prominent Russian explorer) on a sailing

schooner Yermak went from the Kara Strait into the Kara Sea in September to

find it free of ice.

1861


The

first steamship line Arkhangelsk-Solovki was opened. The voyages of the first steamship

Vera lasted for 20

–24 h.


1862

Lieutenant P.P. Kruzenshtern sailed on two ships, the schooner Yermak and the yacht Embryo,

from the mouth of the Pechora River to the Kara Sea. Yermak was crushed in the ice and sank.

The military Port of Arkhangelsk was demolished. The only facilities left were a part of the

hydrographic unit and the required number of military vessels to maintain lighthouses and

buoy-inspection.

1862

–1865


Yu.I. Koshelevsky sailed from the mouth of the Pechora River to the mouth of the Yenisei.

1863


A steamship company was founded on the Yenisei River.

1866


The journal

“Marine Collection” published “Navigation Timetable or the White Sea Coast-

Dwellers

’ Navigation Directions” (these sailing directions are known in three

versions

– Kemskiye, Sorokskiye, and Sumskiye).

1867

M.K. Sidorov



filed a note to the Heir (the future Emperor Alexander III) “On the Means to Pull

the Russian North out of Plight.

1868


M.K. Sidorov visited Norway where he met with the Swedish scientist and polar explorer

N.A.E. Nordenskjold and gained the scientist

’s interest in his plans for the development of the

Kara Sea Route.

1869

The sailing of the Norwegian



fisherman E. Iogannesen. He crossed the Kara Sea from the

eastern mouth of the Matochkin Shar to Vaygach Island and then to the Yamal and further to

Belyi Island. He was awarded a Silver Medal by the Stockholm Academy of Sciences for

hydrological observations.

Twenty-four Norwegian

fishing vessels went along and across the southwestern part of the

Kara Sea.

M.K. Sidorov was allowed to equip naval expeditions

“to discover the routes through the

Arctic Ocean at the mouth of the Ob and Yenisei Rivers,

” followed up by the right for duty-free

import of foreign goods to Siberia (on a speci

fic list).

The expedition on the exploration of the White Sea departed from Arkhangelsk. It visited

Solovki, the Onezhskiy, Terskiy, Pomorskiy, and Karelian coasts of the White Sea.

1870


The

“First Murmansk Whaling and Fisheries Partnership” was set up on Shalim Island.

Academician A.F. Middendorf sailed into the Barents Sea near the Novaya Zemlya and made

the


first attempt to trace the penetration of warm Atlantic waters to the east in the Barents Sea.

“The White Sea-Murmansk Express Shipping Company” was set up in order to provide for the

commercial trading stations of the coast-dwellers on the Kola Peninsula, regular lines were

opened.


The Committee of the Russian Geographic Society developed a project of an expedition to the

northern seas (the report of P.A. Kropotkin).

I.P. Belavenets, Head of the Compass Observatory, led a magnetic survey along the river way

from Schlüsselburg to Arkhangelsk, and then in the White Sea and on the Murmansk coast.

“Fellowship of the White Sea-Murmansk Express Shipping Company” was established.

The Grand Duke Alexei Alexandrovich made a trip in the White Sea and to the Novaya

Zemlya, he was accompanied by Academician A.F. Middendorf.

1872


“Map of the Arctic Ocean and the Kara Sea including the Novaya Zemlya. Compiled from the

Russian inventories of 1734

–1870. Published by the Hydrographic Department of the Ministry

of Marine in 1872. Scale 1:21,000,000, or 30 miles in one English inch

” was published.

A. Petermann compiled and published the map of the northern coast of the Novaya Zemlya

(scale 1:720,000).

The meteorological station near Arkhangelsk started monitoring the temperature of the water

in the Northern Dvina River.

(continued)

Chronology of the Key Historical Events on the Western Seas of the Russian Arctic

487


1873

The Austrian expedition of K. Weyprecht and J. Payer on board of Tegetthoff discovered the

land, named Franz Josef Land after the Austrian Emperor.

1874


The English captain Joseph Wiggins made the

first voyage in the Kara Sea on the steamship

Diana (later he sailed in 1876, 1878, 1884, 1887, 1888, 1889, 1890, 1893, and 1894).

1875


The partnership

“Arkhangelsk-Murmansk Express Shipping Company” was established.

The Swedish polar explorer N.A.E. Nordenskjold,

financed by the Swedish industrialist Oscar

Dixon, sailed on the sailing vessel Pröven (displacement of 43 t) from Tromso, Norway, along the

west coast of the Novaya Zemlya, went into the Kara Sea through the Yugorskiy Shar and near the

mouth Yenisei discovered an island, which he named Dikson, and then returned to his homeland

overland through Russia.

The fundamental work of S.F. Ogorodnikov

“History of Port Arkhangelsk” (from 1693 to

1862) was published in St.-Petersburg.

1876


N.A.E. Nordenskjold organized an expedition to the Kara Sea on the transport steamer Ymer

(displacement of 400 t),

financed by the Russian gold-miner A. Sibiryakov. A large island,

which Nordenskjöld named Sibiryakova Island, was discovered in the northern part of the

Yenisei Bay.

J. Wiggins on the boat Themse delivered the cargo to the Yenisei (Kureika). Suggestions were

made to consider this year the beginning of the steamship trade voyages through the Kara Sea

to the mouth of the Yenisei.

1876

–1877


The expeditions of the Society for the Promotion of the Russian Merchant Shipping, under the

leadership of H. Dal

’, examined the Gulf of Ob and determined its accessibility for small

draught ships.

The expedition, led by Professor N.P. Vagner from St.-Petersburg, worked in the White Sea.

1876


–1878

The Norwegian North Atlantic expedition on Vöringen conducted considerable research in the

Barents Sea.

1877


By the resolution of the Governor of Arkhangelsk, 90 Nenets were resettled to the Novaya

Zemlya, where they formed three encampments

– Malye Karmakuly and Beluzhskaya Guba

on the west coast of the South Island and the Matochkin Shar

– at the eastern exit of the

eponymous strait.

The sailing ship Zarya transported the

first cargo from the Yenisei (graphite, fish, furs, etc.) to

St.-Petersburg, under the command of Captain D.I. Shvanenberg.

1878


The Norwegian E. Iogannesen on the schooner Nordland sailed into the Kara Sea and opened

Solitude Island at its extreme northeast.

The Swedish polar expedition on the ship Vega, under the leadership of N.A.E. Nordenskjold,

conducted partial inventory and survey off the shores of Taymyr Island.

1878

–1879


N. Nordenskjold on the ship Vega went from Tromso, Norway, to Nagasaki, Japan, along the

Northern Sea Route from one wintering in the Kolyuchinskaya Bay, near the Bering Strait.

This was the

first voyage through the Northeast Passage.

1878

–1884


The Dutch ship Willem Barents sailed annually in the Barents Sea, gathering a wealth of

material.

1879

The Dutch research vessel Willem Barents approached the southern shores of the Franz Josef



Land. They discovered a new island there, which was later called Hooker.

1880


The Scottish yachtsman Lee Smith on the steam yacht Eira cruised off the south coast of Franz

Josef Land and opened the islands of Northbrook, Bruce, George Land, Alexandra Land, and

several smaller islands.

1880


–1881

The owner of the New York Herald newspaper, James Gordon Bennett sent the search-and-

rescue ship Oscar Dixon in search of the schooner Jeanette, but the ship did not

find De Long’s

schooner and was crushed by the ice in the Yenisei delta, having lost of its crew.

(continued)

488

Chronology of the Key Historical Events on the Western Seas of the Russian Arctic



1881

The second expedition of Lee Smith on the steam yacht Eira to the Franz Josef Land.

Anchoring at Cape Flora on Northbrook Island, the yacht sank. The members of the expedition

were rescued and wintered on the cape. The following year, they made it to the Novaya Zemlya

on the boat, where they were met by the ships, sent to the rescue.

The hydrographic expedition, led by S.A. Moiseev, conducted an inventory of the Gulf of Ob

of the Kara Sea.

St.-Petersburg Society of Naturalists, with the participation of Professor N.P. Vagner organized

Russia

’s first marine biological station on the Solovetsky Islands to explore the flora and fauna



of the White Sea, initially often referred to as the biological station of the Solovetsky

Monastery.

1882

The winterer of the polar station



“Malye Karmakuly” Dr. L.F. Grinevetskiy was first to cross

the southern island of the Novaya Zemlya from the coast of the Barents Sea to the Kara Sea

and back.

The Dutch, with the permission of the Russian Government, decided to build a polar station on

Dikson Island to carry out the observations under the program of the First International Polar

Year. A small Norwegian ship Varna (250 m) was chartered for the Dutch expedition, headed

by the scientist M. Snellen. Trying to get into the Kara Sea, Varna was carried into the sea by

the ice, where it was met by the steamer Dymphna of the Danish expedition, drifting in the Kara

Sea in order to implement the plan of building a station at Cape Chelyuskin. Having freed itself

from the ice, the vessel Dymphna of the Danish expedition, arrived in Norway.

The

first floating North Dvina lighthouse was set in its regular place and operated for 25 years.



1882

–1883


Holding the First International Polar Year, with the participation of 12 countries (Russia,

Denmark, Sweden, Norway, Finland, Holland, England, the USA, Canada, Germany, Austria-

Hungary, and France).

A geophysical station was set up at the mouth of the Lena River.

1883

The Norwegian ship Varna sank, the members of the Dutch expedition switched to Dymphna,



as a preliminary and then made a decision to reach the Yugorskiy Shar across Vaygach Island

on foot and boats, where they met the steamer Louise, which took them to Norway.

“Hydrographic Description of the Northern Coast of Russia, Compiled by Lieutenant

Commander M.Reinecke. Part 1: The White Sea

” was published.

1885


The

fishing encampment Eretiki was founded in the northern part of the Ura Bay of the Barents

Sea, where one of the

first companies on whale hunting and processing was set up. The

settlement was renamed Port Vladimir in honor of Grand Duke Vladimir Alexandrovich, a

brother of Emperor Alexander III, who had visited it.

The fundamental work

“The White Sea Invertebrate” by N.P. Vagner was published.

1886

Norwegian walrus hunters began to sail to the Franz Josef Land Archipelago.



1887

The Independent White Sea Survey was established for conducting hydrographic operations.

A.I. Vilkitskiy and F.F. Vitram determined via telegraph the difference in the longitudes in the

area of Pulkovo-Arkhangelsk.

The Russian ethnographer and statistician E.K. Ogorodnikov published his research

“Coastal


Areas of the Arctic and White Seas and their Tributaries according to the Big Draft Book.

1887



–1889

The expedition, led A.I. Vilkitskiy, was

first to carry out the work on determining the

acceleration of gravity (on the Novaya Zemlya, in Arkhangelsk and Malye Karmakuly) in the

Arctic sector of Russia.

1887


–1914

A series of reconnaissance surveys and detailed marine inventories of the most important areas

of the White Sea were made under the leadership of: E.V. Maidel (1887

–1891), M.E. Zhdanko

(1891

–1897), A.A. Maltsov (1898–1904), F.K. Drizhenko (1905–1907), K.I. Prestin (1908),



I.S. Sergeyev (1909

–1910), and N.N. Matusevich (1911–1914).

1889

The Anglo-Siberian Trading Company was set up for navigation on the Kara Route.



A hydrographic expedition was organized to explore the southern part of the Kara Sea and the

mouths of the rivers of Ob and Yenisei.

1889

–1899


The Solovetskaya Biological Station of St.-Petersburg Society of Naturalists operated in the

White Sea.

(continued)

Chronology of the Key Historical Events on the Western Seas of the Russian Arctic

489


1890

“The General Statute on Sea Pilots” was published, being the most comprehensive legal act

regulating the activities of pilots in Russia until 1917. The statue provided for the

establishment of six pilotage districts: the Belomorian, Baltic, Kronstadt, Black Sea, Caspian

and Eastern districts; the basic organizational unit of it was the Pilots

’ Society. The

management of pilots in all the seas of Russia was carried out by the Marine Department of the

Main Hydrographic Of

fice.

1890


–1891

N.N. Kolomeytsev on the longboat Kuznechikha and the schooner Bakan conducted

hydrographic operations as part of the Separate Survey of the White Sea.

1890


–1910

A large set of hydrographic operations were performed in the Barents Sea, on the ships

Naezdnik, Murman, Dzhigit, Vestnik, Bakan, Samoyed, and Pakhtusov, under the leadership of

A.I. Vilkitskiy, N.V. Morozov, M.E. Zhdanko, A.M. Bukhteev, and F.K. Drizhenko.

1891

–1893


Hydrographic works were completed at the mouth of the Northern Dvina River for the

construction of the railway to Arkhangelsk.

1893

The cruiser of the second rank Nayezdnik was sent from the Baltic to the Barents Sea to patrol



territorial waters (all the bays, inlets, and raids of the Russian coast of the Arctic Ocean and

around the White Sea).

In England, by the order of the Ministry of Marine, three vessels were built: the twin-screw

steamer Lieutenant Ovtsyn, the paddle steamer Lieutenant Malygin, and the sailing barge

Lieutenant Skuratov. All three ships, under the general direction of the commander of the

steamer Lieutenant Ovtsyn Lieutenant L.F. Dobrotvorskiy, arrived safely from England

through the Kara Sea to the Yenisei in the same year. The steamer Lieutenant Malygin was

commanded by Lieutenant E.L. Shvede, the sailing barge Lieutenant Skuratov

– by Lieutenant

P. Tunderman. The sea ships delivered a consignment of cargo for construction of the Siberian

railway.

The project of hydrographic research of the Siberian coast, adjacent to the mouths of the

Yenisei and Ob, as well as parts of the Kara Sea, was approved.

Passing soundings in the Kara Sea were taken and the visual survey of the Yenisei from

Krasnoyarsk to Turukhansk was conducted, under the direction of L.F. Dobrotvorskiy,

E.L. Shvede et al.

The beginning of the outstanding Norwegian Arctic Expedition, led by Fridtjof Nansen, on the



Download 0.66 Mb.

Do'stlaringiz bilan baham:
1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   10




Ma'lumotlar bazasi mualliflik huquqi bilan himoyalangan ©fayllar.org 2020
ma'muriyatiga murojaat qiling