Contemporary approaches to classification of the countries and comparative analysis of the key macroeconomic indicators of the leading world economies


Download 62.94 Kb.
Pdf ko'rish
Sana30.09.2020
Hajmi62.94 Kb.

ACTUAL ECONOMY: LOCAL SOLUTIONS FOR GLOBAL CHALLENGES

 

 



www.conferace.com 

 254 


 

CONTEMPORARY APPROACHES TO CLASSIFICATION OF THE 

COUNTRIES AND  COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS OF THE KEY 

MACROECONOMIC INDICATORS OF THE LEADING WORLD ECONOMIES 

 

Nareenad Panbun 

 

Faculty of management science 

Suan Sunandha Rajabhat University  

Bangkok, Thailand 

e-mail: nareenad.pa@ssru.ac.th 

 

The  article  is  dedicated  to  the  analysis  of  approaches  to  classification  of  the  countries  in 



accordance  with  the  new  UN  report  “World  Economic  Situation  and  Prospects  2018”. 

Further,  the  authors  analyze  the  dynamics  of  the  key  macroeconomic  indicators  (such  as 

growth, inflation, unemployment) in the G7, G20 and BRICS countries. 

 

Keywords:  world  economy,  developed  countries,  developing  countries,  countries  with 

transitional economies, unemployment rate, inflation rate, economic growth. 

 

Introduction 

 

The  modern  world  economy  is  a  dynamic  mechanism  consisting  of  various 



categories of countries that are also undergoing permanent changes. 

At  the  end  of  2017,  the  United  Nations  prepared  the  report  “World  Economic 

Situation  and  Prospects  2018”  (WESP).  The  report  contains  3  chapters  and  statistical 

annexes. 

The first chapter presents an assessment of the prospects for the global economy for 

2018–2019. on indicators such as economic growth, investment, international trade, capital 

flows,  the  labor  market,  poverty  problems,  as  well  as  forecasts  of  changes  in  prices, 

interest rates, monetary and fiscal policies. 

The  second  chapter  is  devoted  to  risks  and  uncertainty  in  the  face  of  strengthening 

protectionist trends in trade policy, as well as changes in international politics, taking into 

account the need to ensure sustainable development. 

The  third  chapter  contains  information  on  the  economic  development  of  certain 

categories of countries and continents.  

Using  the  data  from  the  above-mentioned  report,  in  our  article  we  would  like  to 

dwell primarily on the following issues:  

-  analyze the new classification of  countries  of the world presented in  the report in 

2017;  

-  on  the  basis  of  the  data  presented  in  the  appendix  to  the  UN  report,  conduct  a 



comparative  analysis  of  individual  categories  of  countries  by  indicators  such  as  GDP 

growth, inflation, unemployment.  

Classification of countries of the world of the UN 2018 For the purposes of analysis, 

the UN divides all countries of the world into three broad categories: developed countries, 

transitional (transitive) economies and developing countries. 

Within  each  category,  subgroups  are  distinguished,  for  example,  by  geographical 

feature.  Geographic  regions  for  developing  countries  are  Africa,  East  Asia,  South  Asia, 

West  Asia  and  Latin  America  and  the  Caribbean.  Also,  a  separate  category  in  the  UN 

classifier  is  the  category  of  fuel  exporting  countries.  An  economy  is  classified  as  a  fuel 

exporter if the share of fuel exports in its total merchandise exports exceeds 20%, and the 

volume  of  fuel  exports  is  at  least  20%  higher  than  the  volume  of  fuel  imports  to  the 


ACTUAL ECONOMY: LOCAL SOLUTIONS FOR GLOBAL CHALLENGES

 

 



www.conferace.com 

 255 


 

country. This criterion is based on the share of fuel exports in the total value of world trade 

in goods. Coal, oil and natural gas act as fuel. 

Another  commonly  used  UN  classification  is  an  indicator  of  the  level  of 

development  of countries,  which is  measured by gross  national  income (GNI) per  capita. 

According to this criterion, 4 groups of countries are distinguished: countries with a high 

level of income, income above the average, income below the average, and low income. To 

ensure  compatibility  with  similar  classifications  used  in  other  countries,  per  capita  GNI 

thresholds are set by the World Bank (Wajeetongratana, 2019). 

The list of least developed countries is determined by the United Nations Economic 

and  Social  Council  and,  ultimately,  by  the  General  Assembly  based  on  the 

recommendations  of  the  Development  Policy  Committee.  The  main  inclusion  criteria 

require  compliance  with  certain  threshold  indicators  for  GNI  per  capita,  quality  of  life 

index  and  economic  vulnerability  index:  low  income  criterion  (average  annual  GDP  per 

capita  for  three  years  is  less  than  750  US  dollars  for  inclusion  in  the  list,  above  900  US 

dollars  for  delisting);  the  criterion  of  the  weakness  of  human  resources,  calculated  using 

the index of real quality of life based on indicators: a) nutrition; b) health; c) education; d) 

adult literacy;  economic  vulnerability  criteria  calculated using the economic vulnerability 

index. 

 

Analysis of the main macroeconomic indicators of leading world powers 

 

For analysis, we selected the countries of the G7, G20, the countries of the Eurasian 



Economic  Union  (EAEU),  as  well  as  the  BRICS  countries  (this  sample  is  determined 

primarily by the economic influence of the selected categories of countries and their role in 

world trade). 

The analysis of economic growth indicators "Big Seven" 

If we analyze the dynamics of economic growth in the G7 countries, it can be noted 

that 2009 was a crisis for all countries - in all economies there was a recession due to the 

consequences  of  the  global  financial  crisis  of  2008.  Moreover,  this  indicator  reached  its 

maximum in 2010 ( 4.1%). In group G7, Canada had the highest economic growth rate in 

2017  (3%).  The  economy  of  Canada  in  a  situation  caused  by  the  global  world  crisis  of 

2008-2009,  showed  good  stability.  After  the  country  emerged  from  the  recession,  its 

position in the list of world leaders in terms of investment attractiveness and GDP growth 

The lowest GDP growth rate in the G7 group in Italy (1.5%). Since 2014, there has 

been  an  increase  in  GDP.  However,  the  economy  of  this  country  is  recovering  after  the 

crisis  more  slowly  than  in  other  European  countries.  The  main  reason  is  the  decline  in 

productivity, which is why Italy has not kept pace with the fast changes in the world over 

the  past  quarter  century.  Part  of  the  problem  of  poor  productivity  in  Italy  is  caused  by 

government inefficiencies and deep-seated business habits. 

 

The Big Twenty 

 

The  analysis  of  economic  growth  rates  in  the  countries  of  the  “Big  Twenty  (G20) 



shows  that  the  most  dynamically  developing  economies  for  2009–2018.  steel  China  and 

India.  For  the  group  of  G20  countries,  we  can  distinguish  the  countries  with  the  highest 

average  rates  of  economic  growth:  China  (7.9%),  India  (14.78%).  The  average  G20 

economic growth rate for 9 years was 3.31%. 

In  2017,  the  G20  group  has  the  highest  economic  growth  rate  in  China  (6.8%). 

According  to  data  released  by  the  IMF,  the  contribution  of  China's  economy  to  global 

economic  growth  exceeds  25%,  and  the  country  remains  the  most  important  driver  of 


ACTUAL ECONOMY: LOCAL SOLUTIONS FOR GLOBAL CHALLENGES

 

 



www.conferace.com 

 256 


 

global economic growth. At the same time, extensive growth, based on scale and pace, has 

been replaced by intensive, focused on quality and profit. 

 

BRICS countries 

 

Analysis of the dynamics of economic growth in the BRICS countries in 2009–2018 



allows us to conclude that China and India show phenomenal growth rates. 

In  2017,  South  Africa  had  the  lowest  economic  growth  rates  (0.6%).  This  can  be 

explained by the political instability of the country. State-owned enterprises received loans 

worth $ 14 billion, although it is obvious that they will never be able to repay them. Rating 

agencies  simply  cannot  overlook  the  government’s  inability  to  solve  this  problem. 

According to Moody’s, the rating of this country at the last stage of the investment level is 

BBB–. But the rating outlook is negative. 

 

Analysis of inflation rates 

 

Analysis  of  inflation  indicators  of  the  G7  countries  in  2009–2018.  allows  us  to 



conclude that in all the economies under consideration it was at the level of 1–2%, and in 

some years deflation was noted (for example, in the USA in 2009, in Japan in 2009–2012 

and in 2016, in Italy in 2016). 

The average inflation rate for the study period for G7 countries as a whole was 1.3%. 

The highest average inflation rate was recorded in the UK - 2.3%, due to its relatively high 

rates  in  2010  (3.2%)  and  in  2011  (4.5%).  The  lowest  average  inflation  rate  is  in  Japan 

(0.31%), which is associated with deflationary trends in the country's economy. Among the 

G7  countries  in  2017,  the  lowest  inflation  rate  is  observed  in  Japan  (0.3%).  The  Central 

Bank of Japan has been trying to raise inflation to 2% since 2013, in order to accelerate the 

country's economic growth, this indicator could not be achieved. The highest inflation rate 

in  2017  is  in  the  UK  (2.8%).  In  2017,  consumer  prices  jumped.  Mostly,  the  pressure  on 

inflation was  exerted by the prices  of computer  games  and airline tickets,  as  well as  fuel 

prices. 

Inflation  rates  in  the  G20  countries  differ  quite  significantly,  since  in  addition  to 

developed countries,  this  group includes  a number of developing  economies, such as,  for 

example, Argentina with galloping inflation in the range from 15% to 42.5% per year. The 

average  value  of  G20  inflation  over  9  years  was  4.6%,  which  is  slightly  higher  than  the 

values recommended by the European Union. Moreover, Argentina has the highest average 

inflation rate (and this is not surprising) (25.06%). 

The  situation  with  the  inflation  rate  in  the  BRICS  countries  looks  generally  stable 

enough: only Russia and India in some years went beyond 10% of the inflation rate. 

Over the study period, the lowest average inflation rate among the BRICS countries 

was recorded in China - 2.27%. The highest average inflation rate in Russia (7.76%). The 

average value of inflation in the BRICS countries for the study period is 5.9%. Among the 

BRICS countries, the highest inflation rate in 2017 was in South Africa (5.6%), which was 

due to an increase in consumer prices. 

The  lowest  inflation  rate  reached  in  China  (1.5%).  As  for  inflation  in  China,  after 

1995 its average annual level (in terms of the GDP deflator) has never exceeded 6%, and in 

1998,  1999  and  2002,  the  Chinese  economy  also  grew  under  deflationary  conditions. 

According  to  experts,  this  was  largely  facilitated  by  increased  competition  caused  by  an 

active  antitrust  policy  and  a  gradual  decrease  in  trade  barriers  (from  42.9%  in  1992  to 

12.3%  in  2002);  reform  of  state-owned  enterprises  and  the  growth  of  private  enterprise; 

decrease  in  external  demand  due  to  the  financial  crisis  of  1997-1998  and  a  small  budget 

deficit (1% of GDP in 1996 and 2.5% in 2003). 



ACTUAL ECONOMY: LOCAL SOLUTIONS FOR GLOBAL CHALLENGES

 

 



www.conferace.com 

 257 


 

The decrease in price dynamics was also supported by a moderate monetary policy: 

the growth rate of the money supply in 1993–2003. decreased from 47 to 20%. However, 

the  steadily  high  investment  rate  is  considered  a  distinctive  feature  of  the  Chinese 

economy,  which  allows  combining  low  price  dynamics  with  record  growth  rates.  Its 

average  value  over  the  past  ten  years  has  been  40%  of  GDP.  In  2003,  the  weight  of 

investments in the gross product exceeded 44%. 

The  latter,  in  the  context  of  their  growth,  increases,  automatically  expanding  the 

supply of goods and services and reducing their price dynamics. This ensures an increase 

in  labor  productivity.  According  to  a  number  of  experts,  it  is  it  that  is  the  second  most 

important factor in China for slowing inflation (after an inertial price increase). Consumer 

expenses  do  not  possess  such  properties.  Their  increase  is  inevitably  accompanied  by 

inflation,  accelerating  as  cash  capacities  become  available.  Therefore,  economic  policy, 

based  on  the  predominant  stimulation  of  consumer  demand,  is  in  some  respects  a 

stalemate:  either  an  increase  in  economic  and  price  dynamics,  or  low  inflation  and  a 

slurred increase in production. 

 

Analysis of unemployment rates 

 

If  we  analyze  the  unemployment  rate  in  the  G7  countries,  we  can  note  that  not  all 



countries  satisfy  the  threshold  level  of  unemployment  set  by  the  International  Labor 

Organization  (8-10%).  For  the  analyzed  period,  the  lowest  unemployment  rates  were  in 

Japan (did not exceed 5.1%), and the highest - in Italy (more than 12% in some years). A 

similar  trend  is  observed  in  the  average  level  of  unemployment  over  a  nine-year  period. 

The average unemployment rate for G7 countries over 9  years is  7.15%. In 2017, the G7 

group had the lowest  unemployment rate in  Japan (2.8%). This  is  the lowest  figure since 

1993. 

An analysis of the unemployment rate for the G20 countries shows negative trends in 



the economy of South Africa - here the unemployment rate for the analyzed period did not 

fall below 23.5%. Also, countries such as France, Turkey, Italy, Brazil did not fit into the 

ILO standards in some years. 

The  average  unemployment  rate  in  the  G20  in  2009–2017  -  7.32%.  High  average 

unemployment rates were observed in South Africa (24.94%), Italy (10.84%). The lowest 

average unemployment rates were noted in countries such as Japan (3.89%), India (3.54%), 

South Korea (3.46%). 

In 2017, Japan had the lowest unemployment rate among G20 countries (2.8%). The 

highest  rate  in  South  Africa  (26%).  This  is  because  African  countries  are  the  poorest 

countries  in  the  world.  This  means  that  the  population  does  not  have  enough  income  to 

show demand in the consumer market, which, in turn, does not contribute to the increase in 

production. It is worth noting that unemployment among young women is especially high 

due  to  some  national  characteristics.  A  weak  legislative  framework  does  not  protect 

African  citizens  and  repels  potential  investors.  An  important  fact  is  the  unstable  political 

situation in the country. 

In  the  BRICS  countries,  the  situation  with  unemployment  is  as  follows.  Low 

unemployment rates for the reporting period are observed in China and India (from 3.5% 

to  4.6%),  while  Brazil  and  South  Africa  do  not  fit  into  ILO  standards.  The  average 

unemployment rate for the BRICS countries over 9 years is 9.43%. In 2017, in the BRICS 

countries,  India  had  the  lowest  unemployment  rate  (3.4%).  Indian  authorities  pay  close 

attention  to  the  problem  of  imbalances  in  the  labor  market.  Despite  the  high  population, 

government measures can alleviate the problem of unemployment. 

 The fight against unemployment in India is mainly carried out through professional 

retraining  of  workers.  It  also  considers  the  introduction  of  credit  mechanisms  for  young 



ACTUAL ECONOMY: LOCAL SOLUTIONS FOR GLOBAL CHALLENGES

 

 



www.conferace.com 

 258 


 

people  to  obtain  skills  relevant  to  the  labor  market.  In  addition,  Indian  authorities  are 

stimulating demand for labor. 

The  country  has  a  scheme  according  to  which  the  state  assumes  the  costs  of 

employers  for  payments  to  various  funds  when  hiring  workers  with  physical  disabilities. 

The highest unemployment rate in 2017 was observed in South Africa. 

 

Conclusion 

 

Among the trends characterizing the main macroeconomic indicators of the countries 



under consideration, the following can be distinguished:  

-  in  all  the  economies  under  consideration  in  2017  (and  in  accordance  with  the 

forecast  for  2018)  there  are  no  stagnation  trends,  all  economies  show  GDP  growth.  The 

largest economic growth is traditionally demonstrated by China and India (6.5% and 7.2% 

respectively), as well as Indonesia and Kyrgyzstan (5.3% and 5.8%);  

- In the field of inflation, the situation is also generally favorable. 

In 2017 and the forecasted 2018, an excess of 10% of the level is observed only in 

Argentina  and  Turkey.  In  the  United  Arab  Emirates,  deflation  was  generally  observed  in 

2017;  With regard to unemployment, in 2017 and 2018, a 10% ILO threshold is exceeded 

in  countries  such  as  Italy,  Turkey,  Brazil,  South  Africa,  and  Armenia.  Summing  up,  I 

would  like  to  note  that  the  world  economic  situation  is  traditionally  characterized  by  a 

situation far from stability. A huge number of economic and political factors influence the 

state of the economies of the world (these are oil prices, technological breakthroughs and 

discoveries, aggravation of political conflicts, and much more). 

The analysis of macroeconomic indicators allows you to get a comprehensive picture 

of  what  is  happening  in  the  world's  leading  economies,  highlight  positive  and  negative 

trend 

 

References: 



 

Drobot  E.V.  (2015).   Managing  the  competitiveness  of  the  national  economy  in  the  context  of 

globalization. Saint Petersburg: Troitskiy most.  

Drobot  E.V.  (2016). Study  of  economic  potential  of  the  Eurasian  Economic  Union:  factors  of 

competitiveness and threats to economic security.  Journal of Entrepreneurship. 17 (12). 1407-1428.  

Kraft Y., Zaytsev A.V. (2015). The role of the state in the development of a competitive environment under 

the influence of global change on the world socio-economic space structure. Creative economy. 9 (4).   

Wajeetongratana,  P.  (2019).  Economic  Liberalization  Philosophy:  Principles  For  Modern  Understanding

Actual Economy: European discourse on  global challenges, proceedings of International  conference, 

Geneva, March. P.123-128. 

World 

Economic 



Situation 

and 


Prospects 

(2018). 


World. 

Retrieved 

April 

08, 


2018, 

from https://www.un.org/development/desa/dpad/document_gem/globaleconomic-monitoring-



unit/world-economic-situation-and-prospects-wesp-report/ 

 

 

Download 62.94 Kb.

Do'stlaringiz bilan baham:




Ma'lumotlar bazasi mualliflik huquqi bilan himoyalangan ©fayllar.org 2020
ma'muriyatiga murojaat qiling