Contents lists available at ScienceDirect


Download 173.37 Kb.
Pdf ko'rish
Sana14.02.2020
Hajmi173.37 Kb.

Contents lists available at

ScienceDirect

Technological Forecasting & Social Change

journal homepage:

www.elsevier.com/locate/techfore

50 years of TF&SC

Fred Phillips

University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, United States of America



Stony Brook

– State University of New York, United States of America

A R T I C L E I N F O

Keywords:

Technology assessment

Technology forecasting

Technology management

Arti


ficial intelligence

Complexity

Operations research

Technology di

ffusion

Multiple perspectives



Technology transitions

A B S T R A C T

On Technological Forecasting & Social Change's 50th birthday, the journal's second and current Editor-in-Chief

remarks on TF&SC's progress, the changes in the technological, cultural, and geopolitical environments in which

the journal operates, TF&SC articles' changing topics and origins, and where future TF&SC volumes may lead.

1. TF&SC's 50th birthday

We celebrate 50 years of a journal that has had an impact in nearly

every corner of the world. In this anniversary essay I update

Linstone

(1989)


and

Phillips (2014)

by remarking on our journal's further pro-

gress, the immense changes in the technological and geopolitical en-

vironments in which the journal operates, the changing topic areas (and

geographical origins) of the articles that

fill our pages, and where future

TF&SC volumes may take us.

When I succeeded Founding Editor-in-Chief Hal Linstone as EIC in

2011, I was proud that TF&SC articles were downloaded 375,000 times

per year. By 2018, annual downloads were 1.2 million. I seem to re-

member the journal receiving 450 manuscript submissions in 2011 (up

from 200-some during my earlier years as editorial board member). In

2018 we received nearly 1900.

Concomitant with the rise in individual article downloads has been

the near-disappearance of subscriptions to the paper journal. Other

changes since 2011 were our move from numerical reference callouts to

Harvard style, 1-column to 2-column pages, and nine issues per year to

twelve.

Oddly for a journal that was started in the USA, manuscript sub-



missions from Europe and Asia (which are similar in number) now

outnumber submissions from the USA about

five to one.

1

One may



speculate that it is due to the falling out of fashion of industrial policy in

the US since 1980, the defunding of the O

ffice of Technology Assess-

ment in 1990, and the fact that Asian and European university de-

partments of technology management far outnumber those in the US.

Following seven years living in Asia, I returned to the USA last year,

and I hope to increase the journal's stature in my home country. I am

grateful to the University of New Mexico for welcoming me and for

hosting the HQ of TF&SC.

TF&SC's birth year fell in the middle of the Cold War. The post-

WWII balance of economic power fell nearly exclusively to the United

States. War was raging in Vietnam, purportedly against communism,

and the contrast between communism and capitalism seemed simple,

with each philosophy appearing monolithic. Now we see diverse vari-

eties of communism in China, Vietnam, Cuba and North Korea. It

quickly became clear that there is more than one brand of capitalism,

too, manifesting in various countries, much of the di

fferences among

them having to do with policies and approaches to technological in-

novation.

Thanks largely to new communication and transport technologies, a

visitor from 1969 would hardly recognize our 2019 private-sector or-

ganizations and industrial structure. Bricks have gone to clicks. Service

https://doi.org/10.1016/j.techfore.2019.03.004

Received 15 October 2018; Received in revised form 9 March 2019; Accepted 11 March 2019

University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, United States of America



E-mail address:

fred.phillips@stonybrook.edu

.

1

Submissions from the USA are fewer, however, than those from the UK and China, and exceed (in descending order) of those from Italy, France, Korea, Spain,



Germany, Netherlands, and Australia. These counts are based on location of corresponding author, and as most of our papers currently have multi-national authorial

teams, should not be taken too literally. Happily we are starting to receive papers from Central Asian, African, and Latin American countries not represented in TF&SC

in the past.

Technological Forecasting & Social Change 143 (2019) 125–131

Available online 28 March 2019

0040-1625/ © 2019 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.



firms and new technology startups dominate the scene. US manu-

facturing has o

ffshored. Mass customization has put paid to economies

of scale. Small and large companies enjoy equally low transaction costs.

The Coasian model and

“Schumpeter II” are on their last legs.

Further, as Peter Drucker foresaw, capitalist society has segued to-

ward a knowledge society. Resistance to this shift, coming from people

with much capital and little knowledge, will likely remain prominent

for decades to come. Yet it is the knowledge society that has the greater

potential to back us away from terminal ecological crisis.

In another shift, the US government's postwar deal with American

scientists

– virtually unlimited research grants as thanks for the suc-

cessful Manhattan Project

– has given way to shrunken sci-tech budgets

and the government's

“Yes, but what have you done for us lately?”

stance toward researchers

– and even worse, the outright suppression of

science, for instance at the Environmental Protection Agency.

The American century has given way to the Asian century. The

Chinese economy has equaled that of the US on many dimensions. More

and more TF&SC manuscripts come from Asia. Patent activity and

world manufacturing capacity have shifted Eastward.

Our journal has constantly adjusted.

2. Technology: Promises and pitfalls

Those a


ffiliated with TF&SC often have to explain that the journal

addresses all kinds of technology, not just information technology. That

said, the journal was born at the start of the modern information age,

and grew up with it. In 1969, when men

first landed on the Moon and

TF&SC's


first issue was printed, computing was done on mainframes. No

personal computers. No cellular telephones, much less smartphones. No

compact discs

– music, like almost everything else in ‘69, was analog.

Text-based computer-to-computer communication was e

ffected through

ARPAnet, an Internet precursor available only to the US military and

selected university researchers.

The journal has grown alongside the information age,

2

while



chronicling the start of the molecular and biological age, and illumi-

nating the interplay of social change with advances in med-tech, bio-

tech, nanotech, space tech, environmental tech, telecomm, agri-tech,

and other socio-technical areas including disaster response and pre-

paredness. Our authors have researched the environmental situation,

then a fringe issue (the

first Earth Day was in 1970), and now a front-

page, contentious and dangerous problem.

Social trends enabled by information/communication technology,

e.g., crowdsourcing and crowdfunding (

Brem et al., 2018

), are chan-

ging the very ways in which innovation happens. Though we do not

now live like the Jetsons after all, life in 2019 would seem like science

fiction to a time-traveler from 1969. In that year, the word “tech-

nology


” was not in the common vocabulary of anyone not deeply in-

volved with the military-industrial complex. Since, we have experi-

enced the dawn, growth, and glitter of Silicon Valley, with its promise

of new technologies that would bene

fit us all. More recently, we have

seen a growing public skepticism about the bene

fits of continued

technological innovation

– and less tolerance for the side-effects of

admittedly bene

ficial technologies.

Akio Morita (Sony Walkman) and Steve Jobs (Macintosh, iPhone)

divined and

filled true latent consumer desires. No one begrudged them

the resulting riches. Today's tech unicorns seek to scale prematurely, in

order to chase a possibly illusory

first-mover advantage. Purveyors of

autonomous vehicles, for example, seek to dominate new markets by

force majeure, regardless of consumer wants, and sometimes, regardless

of the law. Income inequality has worsened, and is no longer seen by

the majority as fair or acceptable.

The tech


firms' growing employee base overruns traditional and

ethnic neighborhoods, notably in San Francisco, Seattle, and Austin.

The

“success” of AirBnB drives Amsterdam natives, exasperated by



crowds of tourists, out of their city each summer.

Environmental degradation, due to the e

ffluents of both traditional

and new industries, a

ffects the livelihoods, homes, and health of more

people than ever before. As does increasingly violent weather due to

climate change.

Recent years have seen the introduction of technology platforms

that purport to be for the public good, but prove to have more nefarious

intent. 2018's (leaking of users' personal information) scandal is a case

in point. Another is a face-recognition system touted for being able to

know, for instance, when a person under an outstanding arrest warrant

passes through a train station. The Big Brother potential of the latter is

obvious.


Since the days of snake oil hawkers, vendors have claimed phony

bene


fits, for profit. Now, though, we see phony benefit claims with

underlying motives of social control and political maneuvering. We

need a name for this kind of technological malfeasance, and we need

research that addresses it.

We do have a name for fraud. The past 50 years have brought so

many technological wonders that people will now believe anything. As

a result, the founders of Theranos enjoyed brief fame and riches. Later

in this essay I will return to this phenomenon of

“automation bias.”

We do have names for anti-intellectualism and deliberate mis-

direction. Fifty years after the amazing and inspiring Moon landing, the

occupant of the White House wants a US Space Force

– while he si-

multaneously denigrates and defunds the scienti

fic research that would

make it possible

– and while what we more urgently need is an ex-

panded Cyber Force.

Far more subtle is the

“nudge” idea of

Thaler and Sunstein (2009)

,

which steers people to the



“right” decision by influencing the decision

environment. Somewhat benign applications of nudge include giving

the little boy in all of us a

fly decal to aim at in the urinal, and opt-out

rather than opt-in for processes like voter registration. This too has the

potential for misuse, for example, candidates jockeying to be

first on

ballot because undecided voters tend to tick the



first box. Could pro-

fessional society standards, e.g., those of the American Psychological

Association, provide ethical guidelines for nudges?

Our technological future is being designed by engineers and pro-

grammers who are badly in need of socialization. The situation is made

worse by the death of lifetime employment, motivating techies to de-

sign things that will impress their next employer (who is also a techie),

rather than products that serve a market or bene

fit society. These

forces, as much as Trumpian anti-intellectualism, do much to explain

the public's declining opinion of the tech industry.

3. TF&SC's focuses

3.1. Technology as an economic driver

Technological Forecasting & Social Change has long recognized that

technological change and socio-economic change drive each other re-

ciprocally. Unlike most economics journals, our journal has been a

congenial home for papers exploring this interaction. Prominent among

these are articles addressing the long wave, a phenomenon originally

documented by Kondratie

ff and embraced later, with modifications, by

Schumpeter and Kuznets.

It is likely that because we welcomed such papers (e.g.,

Coccia,

2017


;

Linstone and Devezas, 2012

;

Modis, 2017



), the Russian Academy

of Sciences and the Kondratie

ff Foundation have awarded the N.D.

Kondratie

ff Medal to a number of current and former TF&SC board

members, namely Brian Berry, Tessaleno Devezas, George Modelski,

2

In those decades, the cost of transmission bandwidth decreased even as



Moore's Law marched on, but the two trends were not always in lockstep.

Accordingly, we lived through waves of centralized and decentralized com-

puting: Mainframes with local I/O, dumb terminals, stand-alone PCs,

“thin


clients,

” more powerful PCs, client-server computing, and now the cloud. I'm

very surprised no one has tried to model this with a Lotka-Volterra.

F. Phillips



Technological Forecasting & Social Change 143 (2019) 125–131

126


and myself, as well as to repeat TF&SC contributors Andrey Korotayev

and Leonid Grinin. These names do in fact comprise a very large frac-

tion of the total number of Kondratie

ff Medals ever awarded.

It is to be hoped that the Nobel Memorial Prizes in Economic

Sciences awarded to Solow (in 1987), Ostrom (in 2009), and Romer (in

2018) will, cumulatively, persuade the rest of the economics profession

to embrace technology and sustainability as central concerns.

3.2. S-curves and innovation di

ffusion


We have published no end of variations on s-shaped di

ffusion


curves, and, from our marketing-oriented authors, market penetration

curves that use the same equations but di

fferent terminology. The

mirrored, dual s-shapes of the Fisher-Pry curve,

first published here,

and the Bass model,

first published elsewhere but often elaborated here,

have been particularly important. Applications of system dynamics and

the Lotka-Volterra model generated still more sinusoidal patterns in

tech-tech and socio-tech interactions.

Such papers will continue, not in order to beat a dead horse, but as

counterpoints to the popular literature touting

“exponential” this and

“exponential” that.

3

We remind readers that Earthly life involves



asymptotes. We'll save

“exponential” for the future age of space ex-

ploration, in which resources will be e

ffectively unlimited.

The curves also show us that uptake of newest tech seems to have

been accelerating; See

Fig. 1

.

4



This is doubtless due to a combination of

network e

ffects, generally better communication and distribution

(perhaps including Amazon's overnight delivery), greater general

wealth, and wider blanketing of more appealing advertising.

In the same manner, we now see faster translation of scienti

fic

discovery into engineering achievement. Examples come from crypto-



graphy, quantum computing, and genetics. I conjecture that the

Leapfrog Theory of Scienti

fic Progress (

Learner and Phillips, 1993

;

Phillips and Linstone, 2016



) explains this. In the ongoing game of

leapfrog among the four aspects of scienti

fic advance, the Data frog (see

the section below) and the Methodology frog are, at this moment, in

front of the Theory and Problems frogs. Methodology has jumped ahead

due to terri

fic recent advances in instrumentation, precision machining,

memory and computing cycles, and such advances as CRISPR. Unlike

the situation in Babbage's time, when computing Theory could not be

instantiated in a mechanical computer due to imprecise machining

(Methodology), the advanced methodologies mentioned above are now

ready and waiting to instantiate new theories and discoveries.

3.3. Arti

ficial intelligence

“The appeal of the algorithm overshadowed its lack of efficacy.”

This sentence from

Fry (2018)

, though directed at a British police

agency that bought a ridiculously nonfunctional AI surveillance system,

applies more broadly to the current hype concerning arti

ficial in-

telligence.

“Despite a lack of scientific evidence to support such claims,”

Fry continues,

“companies are selling algorithms to police forces and

governments that can supposedly

‘predict’ whether someone is a ter-

rorist or a pedophile based on his or her facial characteristics alone.

Hutson (2018)



documents the ways in which AIs are easy to mislead

and to hack.

AIs operating on retail

“big data” fare little better than the police

system. They solicit me to book air tickets for itineraries I have already

purchased. Social media urge me to

“friend” people who have been

dead for years. Thus the news that child welfare agencies are using

predictive algorithms to decide when kids might not be safe with their

own parents

5

is, to say the least, scary.



Yet companies as well as public agencies are embracing, selling,

buying, and touting purported business AI capabilities. The psychology

that drives this behavior, according to

Gaulkin (2018)

, is

“automation



bias,

” a general belief that robots are inherently smarter than humans.

The bias probably stems from highly visible triumphs of narrow AI like

the Jeopardy win, and from the public's hazy grasp of the di

fference

between narrow and general AI.



Shane (2018)

writes that several companies that tout their AI cap-

abilities are faking it.

“Pseudo-AI” or “hybrid AI” has humans standing

by to

fill the gaps in interactions between machines and the public. This



is no surprise; as Hal and I have said on several occasions, computer-

aided is often a better bet than computerized.

Marr (2018)

echoes this:

“Collaboration with human workers may be the most productive and

cost-e


fficient [AI] model for the medium and even long term.” That

implies much for calculations of AI-related job losses, which may be

overstated if hybrid AI becomes the norm.

Gaulkin (2018)

quotes

Harari's (2018)



fear that

“we invest too much

in AI and too little in developing the human mind.

” Forgive me for

reminding you that you read that warning in

Phillips (2008)

. In this

vein, we ignore at our peril the environmental hazards that impair

human cognitive function.

Ives (2018)

writes in the New York Times that

“prolonged exposure to air pollution in China is causing significant

cognitive de

ficits…. The evidence is reflected in performance on math

and word recognition tests, so the impact is on practical work-related

skills. And it especially impacts men.

Because robots and IoT devices are networked and thus capable, in



principle, of authoritarian surveillance and control, Harari (again ac-

cording to Gaulkin)

“thinks we can avoid the worst outcomes by en-

couraging decentralization of data.

” This echoes system principles of

centralization/decentralization put forth in

Linstone and Phillips

(2013)


and in years past by system theorist Sta

fford Beer and philoso-

pher Karl Popper.

These threats of AI have appeared, and more will appear in the

future. Programmers, accustomed to denotative meaning, have started

to see that connotation, nuance and context are important for AI

– but

have no idea whatsoever of the depth and subtlety of nuance and



context. Our journal, with one foot in engineering and one foot in social

science, does its best to bridge this gap, even adding ventures into the

humanities, viz., Mitro

ff's and Coates' contributions on ethics.

I have given up my hobby of collecting trend crossovers,

6

because as



I myself have written (

Phillips, 2008

), almost every aspect of life is now

multi-faceted. We will no longer see clear-cut instances of

“A has sur-

passed B.

” Instead, we see that a particular aspect of A is doing better

than a certain aspect of B. Some measures of the Chinese economy have

surpassed the same measure of the US economy; the Methodology frog

has carried many but not all methodologies ahead of Theory; an AI

specialized for task X now does task X better than humans.

Narrow AI will outshine humans on more and more particular tasks

as time passes. Its bene

ficial use in data and text mining, bibliometrics

and literature-based discovery has been prominent in Technological

Forecasting & Social Change, notably in the works of board members

Porter, Kajikawa, Cunningham, and Kosto

ff.

7



General AI, and thus the

“singularity,” are not in sight.

3

E.g.,


Diamandis and Kotler (2012)

. Those authors may be right about

electronic and DNA-based stored data, the growth of which may remain ex-

ponential for some time to come. The intellectual capabilities of arti

ficial in-

telligences may also grow without foreseeable bound

– though we cannot call it

exponential, as we have no way to measure intelligence levels much higher than

our own.

4

Sanwal (2017)



attributes this graph to Michael Felton of the New York Times.

5

http://www.thelowdownblog.com/2018/09/states-are-using-predictive-



algorithms.html

.

6



The entire collection is at

www.generalinformatics.com/crossovers.html

.

7

We now receive, from other authors, too many bibliometrics-based manu-



scripts, due to writers eager to apply a new technique rather than eager to

answer a substantive research question or, as in this special issue, to trace the

development of a

field of inquiry on a significant anniversary.

F. Phillips

Technological Forecasting & Social Change 143 (2019) 125–131

127


3.4. Multiple perspectives

Hal Linstone pushed the multiple-perspectives idea in many spee-

ches and articles. The upper-right quadrant of

Fig. 2


implies multiple

legitimate perspectives will arise in any modern complex-complex

problem. What to do with them?

These paragraphs from

Linstone and Mitro

ff (1994)


, two of the most

brilliant I've ever read, highlight the problem.

Consider

… the problem of drug use and addiction…. [To an edu-

cator] the problem is one of educating young people and their fa-

milies to the dangers of drug use

…. In the language of economics,

the problem is the huge pro

fits associated with the production and

consumption of illegal substances

…. In the language of social work,

the problem is the breakdown of the family, the lack of male role

models, and so on. In medical terms, the problem is one of treating

the physiology of drug addiction. For the criminal justice system, the

problem is

… money for policing. For psychology, [it] is the despair

of people in inner cities and the associated problems of low self-

esteem


…. Each [discipline] uses different variables to structure the

‘problem,’ and consequently collects very different kinds of data.

Action taken to advance one group's success metrics will exacerbate

the problems as they are seen by the other groups. The social

worker's free meal center for street addicts will, from the perspective

of the city planner, make an already undesirable neighborhood even

less attractive to business investment, and, to the economist, create

a disincentive to gainful employment.

Our challenge now is to

find ways to get diverse participants to

agree ab initio on what would constitute improvement, and what would

constitute solution

– and then take action to attack the problem. This

will be preferable to one of the professions in the above paragraphs

imposing a solution that will be met with recrimination from the others,

afterward.

3.5. Scenarios

Scenario methods for forecasting and foresight were a particular

love of Hal's. Numerous papers and special issues on scenario methods,

which are key to decision making in the upper right quadrant of

Fig. 2

,

have appeared throughout our 50-year history, and continue to do so.



Recognition goes to George Wright and his colleagues, and to Murray

Turo


ff and his, who have driven the recent scenario-related special is-

sues.


3.6. Innovation systems and transitions

We have and continue to be a prime (and highly cited) outlet for

work on technological transitions (e.g.

Geels, 2005

;

Verbong and Geels,



2010

;

Brem and Radziwon, 2017



;

Rogge et al., 2018

). This idea, ori-

ginating in Europe, informed EU policy-making (

EU, 2009

) and more

recently crossed the Atlantic to appear in the pages of Science (

Geels


et al., 2017

). The underlying idea of socio-technical innovation systems

and their development in technological areas was a key topic in TF&SC

in recent years and will remain so in the future.

Recent special issues on transitions were guest-edited by Berkhout,

Hof, and van Vuuren, and by Frantzeskaki. Advisory Board member

Rob Raven, expert in transitions, stepped up to an Associate Editor role

in 2018, in order to help keep TF&SC on the forefront of this

field.

3.7. Complexity



Linstone and Phillips (2013)

urged that management attention be

directed to forestalling complexity rather than managing it. Yet clearly

this is not always possible. What has not received enough attention in

TF&SC is the fact (e.g.,

Prigogine and Nicolis, 1985

) that complex

systems can be self-organizing. They are not always catastrophic. At-

tractors can be periodic as well as static or chaotic, viz. the long waves

mentioned elsewhere in this essay.

Obviously human society has organized spontaneously (if not al-

ways successfully), as has the business

firm that publishes this journal. I

await papers that use complexity theory, rigorously, to look at self-or-

ganization in the context of technological and social change.

3.8. Environment and energy

Our stream of articles on these topics has ranged from predictions of

electricity demand to (often controversial) takes on the integrated as-

sessment models of climate. With nuclear and biological warfare and

environmental degradation constituting the most pressing challenges to

human survival, it is urgent that a high-quality stream of energy/en-

vironment research continues to appear in this journal.

Fig. 1. Penetration of new technology products is faster than in earlier decades. (Source:

Sanwal, 2017

).

yti

xel

p

mo

Cl

an

oit

azi

na

gr

O

High


Leadership

Multiple 

perspectives, dialog 

methods augment 

mathematics.

Low


“Just do it”

Mathematics

Fig. 2. A classi

fication of decision problems and constructive responses.

This version of the Figure is adapted from the Strategic Decision Group's.

F. Phillips

Technological Forecasting & Social Change 143 (2019) 125–131

128


3.9. Systems, forecasting, and operations research

Many scholars of technology management came to the

field from

operations research, as did Hal and I. The two

fields seldom reference

each other these days. (Hal once pointed out a Management Science

article that mentioned

“a journal called Technological Forecasting &

Social Change

” – as if Management Science readers had never heard of

us.) The split is unfortunate, and I hope for reconciliation. The link

between the two, clearly, is decision science.

A simple example will demonstrate. Operations researchers

figured


out how to draw and solve decision trees. In these trees, chance nodes

generate branches with probabilities (of various partial outcomes) at-

tached to them. Where do the probabilities come from? O.R. texts hand-

wave this question away, appearing to assume the numbers are

“given.”

But obviously it is forecasters like us who must generate these prob-

abilities. With probability p the resource will be found, or not (1-p). The

needed technology will be developed on time (p), or not (1-p).

Let's bring O.R. and technology forecasting together again.

TF&SC papers have migrated toward

Fig. 2

's upper right quadrant,



as the problems we face and address have become more cross-cultural,

systemic and global. In order to reconcile our

fields of study, our O.R.

colleagues will have to step outside the comfortable lower right quad-

rant

– even as O.R. drifts more and more in the direction of “analytics” –



and join us, at least sometimes, in the upper right.

Applause goes to Gerald Midgley,

8

who with his colleagues Angela



Espinosa and Giles Hindle organized systems thinking sessions at the

2018 Operational Research Society Conference. He writes,

We

…want to establish systemic approaches to stakeholder engage-



ment, problem structuring and modeling as core elements of main-

stream OR practice. Here is why:

…. In 2017, the United Nations (UN), the World Health

Organization (WHO) and the Organization for Economic Co-opera-

tion and Development (OECD) all publically declared systems

thinking to be a key leadership skill that is necessary to deal with the

fundamental interconnectedness of complex, local-to-global eco-

nomic, social and environmental issues.

…. Practitioners must think seriously about how they can transform

OR practice to better address the complexities of an increasingly

interconnected world, where stakeholders with di

fferent priorities

often collide. If OR practitioners fail in this regard, they will

find


themselves largely excluded from dealing with the most serious

challenges in today's societies.

I frequently read assertions that facts are readily available on the

Internet, and that therefore educators should downplay the teaching of

facts, in favor of teaching systems, i.e., how to connect disparate facts

together. This somewhat meritorious argument overlooks two key

points,

first, that we still need people with in-depth understanding of a



particular

field (i.e., one consisting of closely related facts), and second,

that 90% of so-called facts on the Internet are ill-informed, nonsensical,

or outright fake.

9

A professor's principal value will be to sift online



content and steer students to the solid and worthwhile portions

– and


then to help students draw connections.

3.10. Gurus

The journal also informs readers about the pioneers and leaders of

forecasting and assessment in the

fields mentioned above. In 2016 we

celebrated the life of Hal Linstone (

Phillips, 2016

) and issued a mem-

orial volume of reprints of the TF&SC contributions of Joe Coates

(Volume 113, 2016). Hal had earlier memorialized Buckminster Fuller,

and Hal's RAND Corp. colleague Herman Kahn. In 2018 we published a

special issue honoring the contributions of Robert Ayres, on the occa-

sion of his 80th birthday. The present issue contains a retrospective on

the work of Seabury Colum Gil

fillan.

3.11. The developing world



TF&SC has encouraged foresight and innovation system activity and

publication in the BRICs and in emerging economies, for example, with

special issues on technology di

ffusion and national innovation systems

in India, Iran, and African countries and regions. It has been a pleasant

duty to bring brilliant authors from those regions into the TF&SC circle.

4. Submissions to TF&SC

Baumberg (2018)

complains that journals o

ffer “too much band-

wagon science and not enough diversity of ideas.

” Another editor has

urged authors to show him, via their manuscripts, where their

field is


and should be going

– rather (he implies) than showing him how adding

a moderating variable to a model will yield another half percent of

explanatory power.

I embrace these remarks. Technological Forecasting & Social Change

has and will continue to publish articles of importance. I say this not

from snobbishness but from necessity. We receive more than 1900

manuscript submissions per year and can publish but a few.

10

The


chosen articles' contribution to knowledge must be substantial, not in-

cremental.

11

Moreover, more important articles are cited more frequently.



Table 1

lists the most cited articles published in 2013

–2018:

Hal Linstone maintained we are moving from the information age to



the molecular age. While TF&SC papers must continue to address

growth pains of the information age (cyber-hoaxes, security, privacy,

automation bias, etc.), other TF&SC papers must look ahead to describe

what society will look like, under advancement and di

ffusion of bio-

logical technologies, nano-tech, and quantum tech

12

– and their con-



vergence with info tech and AI.

5. TF&SC's next challenges

Unlike in 1969, the word

‘technology,’ and arguments about tech-

nology's impacts, are now on everyone's tongue-tip, daily. A number of

other technology management journals have appeared, and more re-

cently journals in traditional areas of strategy, economics, and mar-

keting are publishing more technology-oriented articles. Technological

Forecasting & Social Change has brought scholarly and policy attention

to the interplay of technological and social change. We must not con-

tinue to

fight a battle that has already been won.

Though Elsevier has enabled TF&SC articles to be published online

immediately upon acceptance, the peer-review process leaves us with a

clock-speed disadvantage, relative to the daily output of Wired and its

ilk. Online publications like Digital Tonto, The Verge, Re/code, and many

more, quickly bring tech trends to the public eye, even as the major

business magazines (Forbes, The Economist) and the remaining major

newspapers have evolved to do likewise.

What battle should TF&SC engage now, and what can we bring to

the battle

field that is unique? The Board and I will continue to ponder.

8

https://www.jiscmail.ac.uk/cgi-bin/webadmin?A2=ornet;a7d6f1de.1803



9

This is a manifestation of Sturgeon's Law:

“90% of everything [in any field of

endeavor] is crap.

10

To adjust to the huge increase in submission rate, I have augmented the



number of Associate Editors and changed a number of work

flow procedures.

Thanks to Associate Editor Yu-Shan Su for suggesting some of these changes,

and thanks also to the Elsevier sta

ff for facilitating them.

11

Articles with implications of more restricted scope should be very short,



and submitted as Research Notes.

12

Subject to the usual cautions, we can say it will look quite exciting. See e.g.



Tangermann (2018)

and


Bub and Bub (2018)

.

F. Phillips



Technological Forecasting & Social Change 143 (2019) 125–131

129


Preliminary thoughts:

Our articles on methodologies remain signi



ficant contributions to

the dialog.

Our impact assessment articles typically show more imagination and



rigor, if less immediacy, than those in the aforementioned maga-

zines.


Short-form journalism allows exploration of trends; TF&SC authors

are able to research interactions among trends.

13



Our well-considered approaches to the future give us wide cred-

ibility. Our readers know we are here to inform them rather than

entertain them.

Our standard of readability nonetheless makes our articles easily



accessible to policy makers.

Our informal partnerships with a number of conference series give



our authors access to ideas that are ahead of the curve.

Our Video Abstracts and Research Highlights, though little-used by



authors so far, are bridges between TF&SC and the popular and

trade presses.

A funded institute of TF&SC (its current status just a gleam in the



editor's eye) would enable full-time researchers to produce in-depth

studies quickly.

If the term

“technology” was rarely heard in ‘69, “technology

management

” was even less so. By 2018, according to

Crisp (2018)

,

technology management had become the second most demanded MBA



concentration worldwide. We have made an impact.

Will TF&SC's future be

“like its past, only more so”? Frankly, I ex-

pect the future to be di

fferent.

Acknowledgments



Appreciation goes to the FITE Department of the University of New

Mexico's Anderson School of Management for providing a research as-

sistant to support the preparation of this special anniversary issue. The

Editor-in-Chief is grateful also to Professor U.N. Umesh for taking on

guest editor responsibilities attending to this issue.

References

Baumberg, J.J., 2018. The Secret Life of Science: How It Really Works and Why It Matters.

Princeton University Press, Princeton, NJ

.

Brem, A., Radziwon, A., 2017. E



fficient Triple Helix collaboration fostering local niche

innovation projects

–A case from Denmark. Technol. Forecast. Soc. Chang. 123,

130


–141

.

Brem, A., Bilgram, V., Marchuk, A., 2018. How crowdfunding platforms change the



nature of user innovation

–from problem solving to entrepreneurship. Technol.

Forecast. Soc. Chang.

https://doi.org/10.1016/j.techfore.2017.11.020.

(In Press,

Corrected Proof).

Bub, T., Bub, J., 2018. Totally Random: Why Nobody Understands Quantum Mechanics.

Princeton University Press

.

Coccia, M., 2017. A theory of the general causes of long waves: war, general purpose



technologies, and economic change. Technol. Forecast. Soc. Chang. 128, 287

–295


(March 2018)

.

Crisp, A., 2018. Is technology the new entrepreneurship for MBAs? EMFD Global



Network, September 7.

https://blog.efmdglobal.org/2018/09/07/is-technology-the-

new-entrepreneurship-for-mbas/

.

Diamandis, P.H., Kotler, S., 2012. Abundance: The Future Is Better Than You Think. Free



Press

.

European Commission Directorate-General for Research, 2009. The World in 2025: Rising



Asia and Socio-ecological Transition. EUR 23921EN

.

Fry, H., 2018. Don't believe the algorithm. Wall Street J. Sept. 5.



https://www.wsj.com/

articles/dont-believe-the-algorithm-1536157620

.

Gaulkin, T., 2018. Arti



ficial stupidity. Bull. At. Sci. September 11.

https://thebulletin.

org/2018/09/arti

ficial-stupidity/

.

Geels, F.W., 2005. Processes and patterns in transitions and system innovations: re



fining

the co-evolutionary multi-level perspective. Technol. Forecast. Soc. Chang. 72 (6),

681

–696


.

Geels, F.W., Sovacool, B.K., Schwanen, T., Sorrell, S., 2017. Sociotechnical transitions for

deep decarbonization. Science 357 (6357), 1242

–1244 (22 September)

.

Harari, Y.N., 2018. 21 Lessons for the 21st Century. Spiegel & Grau



.

Hutson, M., 2018. Hackers easily fool arti

ficial intelligences. Science 361 (6399), 215. LP-

215. Retrieved from.

http://science.sciencemag.org/content/361/6399/215.

abstract


.

Ives, M., 2018. Pollution may dim thinking skills, study in China suggests. N.Y. Times

Aug. 29.

https://www.nytimes.com/2018/08/29/world/asia/pollution-health-

china.html

.

Kortenkamp, A., Faust, M., 2018. Regulate to reduce chemical mixture risk. Science 361



(6399), 224. LP-226. Retrieved from.

http://science.sciencemag.org/content/361/

6399/224.abstract

.

Learner, D.B., Phillips, F., 1993. Method and Progress in management science. Socio



Econ. Plan. Sci. 27 (1), 9

–24


.

Linstone, H.A., 1989. Twenty years of TF&SC. Technol. Forecast. Soc. Chang. 13, 1

–13

.

Linstone, H.A., Devezas, T., 2012. Technological innovation and the long wave theory



revisited. Technol. Forecast. Soc. Chang. 79 (2), 414

–416


.

Linstone, H.A., Mitro

ff, I.I., 1994. The Challenge of the 21st Century: Managing

Technology and Ourselves in a Shrinking World. State University of New York Press

.

Linstone, H.A., Phillips, F., 2013. The simultaneous localization-globalization impact of



information/communication technology. Technol. Forecast. Soc. Chang. 80 (7).

https://doi.org/10.1016/j.techfore.2013.04.011

.

Marr, B., 2018. Is your organization ready for smart Cobots? Forbes Aug 29.



https://

www.forbes.com/sites/bernardmarr/2018/08/29/the-future-of-work-are-you-ready-

for-smart-cobots/#361e1371522b

.

Modis, T., 2017. A hard-science approach to Kondratie



ff's economic cycle. Technol.

Forecast. Soc. Chang. 122, 63

–70

.

Phillips, F., 2008. Change in socio-technical systems: researching the multis, the biggers,



and the more connecteds. Technol. Forecast. Soc. Chang. 75 (5), 721

–734 June

.

Phillips, F., 2014. Editorial: state and direction of the journal, 2013. Technol. Forecast.



Soc. Chang. 82, 1

–5

.



Phillips, F., 2016. Hal Linstone (1924

–2016): remembrance. Technol. Forecast. Soc.

Chang. 111, 1

.

Phillips, F., Linstone, H., 2016. Key ideas from a 25-year collaboration at TFSC. Technol.



Forecast. Soc. Chang. 105, 158

–166 (April)

.

Table 1


TF&SC most-cited articles, 2013

–18.


The future of employment: How susceptible are jobs to computerisation?

Frey C.B.,Osborne M.A.

Locked into Copenhagen pledges - Implications of short-term emission targets

for the cost and feasibility of long-term climate goals

Riahi K.,Kriegler E.,Johnson N.,Bertram C.,den Elzen M.,Eom J.,Schae

ffer M.,Edmonds J.,Isaac

M.,Krey V.,Longden T.,Luderer G.,Mejean A.,McCollum D.L.,Mima S.,Turton H.,van Vuuren

D.P.,Wada K.,Bosetti V.,Capros P.,Criqui P.,Hamdi-Cherif M.,Kainuma M.,Edenhofer O.

The choice of innovation policy instruments

Borras S.,Edquist C.

Toward an e

ffective framework for building smart cities: Lessons from Seoul

and San Francisco

Lee J.H.,Hancock M.G.,Hu M.-C.

The cost of additive manufacturing: Machine productivity, economies of scale

and technology-push

Baumers M.,Dickens P.,Tuck C.,Hague R.

The role of social support on relationship quality and social commerce

Hajli M.N.

From rapid prototyping to home fabrication: How 3D printing is changing

business model innovation

Rayna T.,Striukova L.

Social innovation: Moving the

field forward. A conceptual framework

Cajaiba-Santana G.

Exploratory Modeling and Analysis, an approach for model-based foresight

under deep uncertainty

Kwakkel J.H.,Pruyt E.

Unlocking value for a circular economy through 3D printing: A research agenda

Despeisse M.,Baumers M.,Brown P.,Charnley F.,Ford S.J.,Garmulewicz A.,Knowles S.,Minshall

T.H.W.,Mortara L.,Reed-Tsochas F.P.,Rowley J.

13

Kortenkamp and Faust (2018)



show the falsity of earlier consensus that it is

only the amounts of individual industrial chemicals in our environment that

have health impacts. Rather, they demonstrate, it is the combinations of che-

micals that determine health hazards. Their work implies that other threats,

too, may have roots in unseen or unacknowledged complexity.

F. Phillips



Technological Forecasting & Social Change 143 (2019) 125–131

130


Prigogine, I., Nicolis, G., 1985. Self-organisation in nonequilibrium systems: towards a

dynamics of complexity. In: Hazewinkel, M., Jurkovich, R., Paelinck, J.H.P. (Eds.),

Bifurcation Analysis. Springer, Dordrecht

.

Rogge, K.S., P



fluger, B., Geels, F.W., 2018. Transformative policy mixes in socio-technical

scenarios: The case of the low-carbon transition of the German electricity system

(2010

–2050). Technol. Forecast. Soc. Chang.



https://doi.org/10.1016/j.techfore.

2018.04.002.

(In Press, Corrected Proof).

Sanwal, A., 2017. Gradually then suddenly. CB Insights

www.cbinsights.com/reports/A-

ha-2017_Keynote.pdf

.

Shane, J., 2018. The way to tell if a bot is actually a human. Slate Retrieved September



10, 2018, from.

https://slate.com/technology/2018/09/how-to-tell-whether-a-bot-

is-really-a-human.html

.

Tangermann, V., 2018. A CRISPR future. In: Futurism, January 30.



https://futurism.

com/crispr-genetic-engineering-change-world/

.

Thaler, R.H., Sunstein, C.R., 2009. Nudge: Improving Decisions About Health, Wealth,



and Happiness. Penguin Books

.

Verbong, G.P., Geels, F.W., 2010. Exploring sustainability transitions in the electricity



sector with socio-technical pathways. Technol. Forecast. Soc. Chang. 77 (8),

1214


–1221

.

Fred Phillips is Editor-in-Chief of Technological Forecasting & Social Change, Professor at



University of New Mexico, Visiting Professor at SUNY Stony Brook, and Visiting Scientist

at the Chinese Academy of Sciences.



F. Phillips

Technological Forecasting & Social Change 143 (2019) 125–131

131

Document Outline

  • 50 years of TF​&​SC
    • TF​&​SC's 50th birthday
    • Technology: Promises and pitfalls
    • TF​&​SC's focuses
    • Submissions to TF​&​SC
    • TF​&​SC's next challenges
    • Acknowledgments
    • References

Download 173.37 Kb.

Do'stlaringiz bilan baham:




Ma'lumotlar bazasi mualliflik huquqi bilan himoyalangan ©fayllar.org 2020
ma'muriyatiga murojaat qiling