Doctor of theology


Download 4.8 Kb.
Pdf ko'rish
bet1/28
Sana01.04.2018
Hajmi4.8 Kb.
  1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   ...   28

 
 
GENDERED CONSCIOUSNESS AS WATERSHED OF MASCULINITY:  
MEN’S JOURNEYS WITH MANHOOD IN LESOTHO 
 
        by 
 
        Tlali Abel Phohlo 
 
Submitted in accordance with the requirements for the degree of 
 
DOCTOR OF THEOLOGY 
 
         in  
 
PRACTICAL THEOLOGY - WITH SPECIALISATION IN PASTORAL THERAPY  
 
      at the 
 
 
                                       UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH AFRICA 
 
 
                                             SUPERVISOR: Dr. D.J. KOTZÉ 
                                        CO-SUPERVISOR: Prof. A.P. PHILLIPS 
 
 
                                      
                                                            February 2011 
 
 


 
Declaration 
I,  Tlali  Abel  Phohlo  declare  that  „Gendered  Consciousness  as  Watershed  of  Masculinity: 
Men‟s Journeys with Manhood in Lesotho‟ is my own work and that all the sources that I have 
used or quoted have been indicated and acknowledged by means of complete references. 
 
 
Tlali Abel Phohlo 
  
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

ii 
 
Acknowledgements 
I can hardly begin to credit by name all the people and life experiences that have helped me to 
achieve what I have achieved in this study. I would like to pay a tribute to a few of them. 
There  is  Paul  Leshota,  whom  I  deeply  value  as  a  friend.  He  encouraged  me  to  enroll  with  the 
Institute  for  Therapeutic  Development  (ITD).  The  approach  of  the  institute  in  the  training  of 
therapists and counselors has challenged me to get in touch with my own ways of thinking and 
being  and  their  effects  on  the  people  I  interact  with  on  the  everyday  life,  especially  those  who 
seek my assistance as  they travel  the road of life with  its,  sometimes, sharp corners.  It  assisted 
me to see which ways to discard and which ones to reinforce, as much as it has enabled me to 
acquire  new  ones.  The  role  Dr.  Bridgid  Hess  played  during  that  training,  is  worthy  of 
acknowledgement. 
I  am  very  thankful  to  my  supervisor  Dr.  Dirk  Kotzé  for  his  wise  and  often  perceptive   
comments. He always challenged and invited me to critically assess the implications of the ideas 
and positions I held, as I grappled with this study. He beckoned and invited me to read my own 
reading of the ideas and positions of others. I admire this as it happens in life that, what people 
say about things, may not be what things are in reality.  I am also  grateful to my co-supervisor, 
Prof.  A.P.  Phillips.  I  equally  appreciate  his  thorough  reading  of  this  text  and  constructive 
comments on it. 
I am very grateful to each and every member of the Reflecting Team for engaging in this work. I 
am  indebted  to  them  for  all  they  have  taught  me  about  men‟s  ways  of  being  and  thinking  in 
Lesotho during the process of this study of mutual benefit. 
I am thankful for all the hard lessons I have learned from my life experiences as a priest in the 
Catholic Church of Lesotho. The history of masculinity in this country and the Church, teaches 
me  that  it  is  easy  for  males  to  use  others,  especially  women,  for  their  purposes,  as  in  all 
institutions,  which  value  them  to  the  extent  to  which  they  are  ready  to  do  the  jobs  that  men 
would not do without their sense of being men, social status and dignity demeaned. 
I dedicate this study to all women and men of Lesotho, who are engaged in the transformation of 
gender relations, and advocate for the wellbeing of women and children in this country.  

iii 
 
Summary 
This study explores the operations of Sesotho masculinity: its dominant ideas and practices and 
their  effects  on  Basotho  women  and  men  and  this  latter‟s  resistance  to  a  gender-ethical 
consciousness  gaining  momentum  in  Lesotho.  It  challenges  a  deep  running  belief  among  the 
Basotho  that  being  born  male  necessarily  means  being  born  into  a  superior  social  position  and 
status  that  is  naturally  and  divinely  sanctioned.  It  investigates  how  the  dominant  postcolonial 
discourse called sekoele  (a return to the traditions of the ancestors) and the Christian churches‟ 
discourses  of  the  “true”/“authentic”  Christian  life,  framed  by  the  classical  biblical  and 
confessional  dogmatic  traditions,  actually  support  and  sustain  this  belief  and  so  reinforce  the 
imbalance  of  power  in  favour  of  men  in  the  order  of  gender  relations  in  Lesotho.  On  the 
contrary,  through  the  principles  of  the  contextual  theologies  of  liberating  praxis,  social 
construction  theory,  a  narrative  approach  to  therapy,  gender-ethical  consciousness  and  
participatory approach, the study argues that masculinity and ways of being and thinking about 
men are socially constructed through historical and cultural processes and practices. It is in these 
processes  and  practices  that  Basotho  men  have  been  and  continue  to  be  advantaged  and 
privileged over women
.   
This study has challenged this situation by tracing the existence of alternative, more ethical ways 
of  being  and  thinking  about  men  in  those  historical  and  cultural  processes  and  practices;  ways 
which are more open to women and children and their wellbeing in the everyday life interactions. 
In  this  way,  the  study  argues  for  a  gender-ethical  consciousness,  which,  in  particular,  invites 
Basotho  men  to  engage  in  a  reflection  on  their  participation  in  a  culture  and  practices  which 
oppress the other,  especially women and children. It invites Basotho men to accountability and 
responsibility.  In  this  sense  a  gender-ethical  consciousness  is  understood  as  watershed  of 
masculinity in  Lesotho.  The participation of a  group of Basotho men who offered to  reflect  on 
their relationship with the dominant masculinities, demonstrates how Basotho men are struggling 
to transform yet they fill us with the hope that change is possible. 
 
 
 

iv 
 
 
Key words  
History, Sesotho masculinity, Sekoele, Bosotho/Sesotho, The Christian life discourses in 
Lesotho, Contextual theologies, Social constructionism, Narrative approach to therapy, Gender-
ethical consciousness, The Reflecting Team, Pastoral Care of Men. 
 
         
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 


 
TABLE OF CONTENTS 
Declaration…………….……………………………………………………………………... i 
Acknowledgment ………………………………………………………………………….… ii 
Summary……………………………………………………………………………..…….… iii 
Key words…………………………………………………………………………….…….... iv 
CHAPTER 1: BASOTHO MEN AT THE CROSSROADS ……….…….……………….. 1  
1.1 Introduction and the Background………………………………….….……………....... 1  
1.2 Research Questions and Aims……………………………………..…………….............. 2 
1.2.1 Research questions……………………………………………..……………………..... 2 
1.2.2 Aims of the research……………………………………….…….,…………………….. 3 
1.3 Literature Review…………………………………………….………..………………..... 5 
1.4 Theoretical Framework and Methodological Considerations…….…..……………….. 8 
1.4.1 Contextual theologies of liberation…………………………………...………............... 8 
1.4.2 Positioning pastoral therapy in a contextual approach………………………………. 10 
1.4.3 Social constructionism…………………………………………………………….......... 11 
1.4.4 Narrative therapy……………………………………………….,….……………….….. 14 
1.5 Organisation of Chapters………………………………………..…….…….……….…... 15 
1.6 An Important Remark about the Text…………………………….………….. …….….. 16  
CHPTER 2: A HISTORY OF SESOTHO MASCULINITY……….….…….….…............. 17  
 2.1 Introduction…………………………………………………………..………................... 17 
 2.2 History and Method……………………………………………….….……….................. 18  
 2.3 Organisational Remark...................................................................................................... 20 
Part One: Basotho Men and War............................................................................................. 21 
2.4 Basotho Men as Hunters and Cattle Raiders.................................................................... 21 
2.4.1 Cattle raiding: a means of accumulating wealth for chiefs, bonding 

vi 
 
           with and controlling subjects under the mafisa system.............................................. 21 
  2.4.2 The mafisa system: a means of control, consolidation of chieftain 
            masculinity and subjugation of common masculinity............................................... 23 
  4.4.3 The lifaqane wars as a condition for the emergence of Basotho men 
          as makaota and cannibals: the consolidation of the chieftain masculinity................ 26 
  2.4.4 The lifaqane wars and a woman leader........................................................................ 26 
  2.4.5 Wars over land: the emergence of Sesotho nationalistic masculinity 
           and the colonial/imperial masculinity.......................................................................... 27 
 2.4.6 The so called Moorosi war as a war of masculinities: who has the  
           last word?........................................................................................................................ 28 
2.4.7 Basotho men‟s resistance to the colonial/imperial masculinity further 
        strengthened....................................................................................................................... 32 
2.4.8 (a) The gun war: a test and opportunity for chieftain masculinity.............................. 36 
2.4.8 (b) The bull as a symbol of the strength of a man.......................................................... 37 
2.4.8 (c) The aftermath of the gun war: a boost of the nationalistic 
              masculinity.................................................................................................................... 39 
2.4.9 The pitso and the imperial masculinity: a subversion of the chieftain and 
          traditional general Sesotho masculinities....................................................................... 40 
2.4.9.1 The traditional Sesotho masculinity and women......................................................... 42 
2.4.9.1 (a) Senate: a challenge to the traditional Sesotho masculinity................................... 43 
2.4.9.1 (b) Chieftain masculinity and women chiefs against the imperial 
                 masculinity................................................................................................................. 44 
2.4.9.1 (c) Women chiefs and women emancipation................................................................ 46 
2.4.9.1 (d) „Mants‟ebo: a challenge to chieftain masculinity................................................... 47 
2.4.10 Feminine manhood.......................................................................................................... 47 

vii 
 
2.5 Summary.............................................................................................................................. 48 
Part Two: The Decline of Chieftain and Imperial Masculinities.......................................... 50 
2.6 The Emergence of the Sesotho Political Masculinity........................................................ 50 
2.6.1 The Basutoland National Council as the platform and matrix of the  
         Sesotho masculinity: a challenge to the chieftain and imperial  
        masculinities....................................................................................................................... 51 
2.6.2 The Basutoland Progressive Association and the political masculinity....................... 51 
2.6.3 The Lekhotla la Bafo and the formation of the radical and partisan  
         masculinity: a challenge to the authority of chiefs......................................................... 53 
2.6.4 The Lekhotla la Bafo and women.................................................................................... 54 
2.6.5 Mokhehle, Leabua and Matji as the representatives of the different faces 
        of the different faces of the Sesotho political masculinity.............................................. 56 
2.7 Summary............................................................................................................................... 58 
Part Three: Labour Migrancy.................................................................................................. 60 
2.8 Introduction.......................................................................................................................... 60 
2.8.1 Basotho men as miners..................................................................................................... 60 
2.8.2 Mines and the subordination of Basotho men................................................................ 62 
2.8.3 Basotho men as “Likoata”................................................................................................ 65 
2.8.4 The compound as a device of control: men under control............................................. 66  
2.8.5 Leisure as a contested political terrain in the mines....................................................... 67 
2.8.6 Lesotho as a holiday rest camp for Basotho men............................................................ 67 
2.8.7 The Reflecting Team.......................................................................................................... 68 
2.9 Summary................................................................................................................................ 68 
2.10 General summary................................................................................................................ 69 
 

viii 
 
CHAPTER 3: EXPLORING SEKOELE.................................................................................. 71 
3.1 Introduction........................................................................................................................... 71 
3.2 Theoretical Framework........................................................................................................ 73 
3.3 The Notion of Sekoele: A Memory of Danger and Resistance.......................................... 74 
3.4 Sekoele and Sesotho Language and Social Cultural Identity........................................... 76  
3.5 Sekoele and Masculinity: Basotho Men and Diversion, a Threat to  
      Bosotho................................................................................................................................... 80 
3.5.1 Sport and music as gendered political tools.................................................................... 82 
3.5.2 The Basotho games: Mohobelo and Mokorotlo as repositories of a  
historical consciousness of the attitudes of the traditional Sesotho  
masculinity................................................................................................................................... 83 
3.5.3 Sekoele and the construction of Basotho men as powerful.............................................86 
3.6 Lebollo: A Traditional Rite of the Construction of Men.................................................. 87 
3.6.1 Lebollo practice under attack.......................................................................................... 88 
3.6.2. Sekoele and lebollo........................................................................................................... 89 
3.7 The Theoretical Framework of Sekoele and the Challenges it Faces.............................. 91 
3.7.1 Men as an essential collective idea................................................................................... 91 
3.7.2 Sekoele as an organisational discourse in the interests of men..................................... 92 
3.7.3 Sekoele and the „Human rights‟ of men.......................................................................... 93 
3.7.4 Sekoele and the decolonisation of the mind.................................................................... 96 
3.8 Sekoele and An Alternative More Ethical Masculinity.................................................... 97 
3.8.1 A gender ethical-consciousness and Basotho men‟s social spaces: 
        khotla and pitso................................................................................................................... 98 
3.8.2 The  Khotla open for women and children: a challenge to male power....................... 99 
3.8.3 Sekoele: Basotho men and childcare............................................................................. 103 

ix 
 
3.8.4 Sekoele and the administration of justice for women................................................... 103 
3.9 Summary.............................................................................................................................. 104  
CHAPTER 4: THE INTERFACE OF NATIONALISM AND  
MASCULINITY IN LESOTHO.............................................................................................. 106 
4.1 Introduction......................................................................................................................... 106 
4.2 Nationalism, Ethnicity and Identity.................................................................................. 107 
4.2.1 Characteristics of Sesotho nationalism.......................................................................... 109 
4.2.2 A nationalist search for identity as a collective imagining........................................... 113 
4.2.3 Bosotho as a negotiated understanding.......................................................................... 114 
4.2.4 Bosotho and politics of identity....................................................................................... 117 
4.3 Sesotho Nationalism and Gender...................................................................................... 122 
4.3.1 The conspiracy of Sesotho nationalism and masculinity against a  
         meaningful  talk about social inequalities in Lesotho................................................... 125 
4.3.2 The manifestation of cultural nationalism and the disempowerment and 
          marginalisation of women.............................................................................................. 129 
4.4 The Challenge of Cultural Identity: A Need for Cultural Relational Turn.................. 135 
4.4.1 Cultural relational turn and gender............................................................................... 138 
4.5 Summary.............................................................................................................................. 141 
CHAPTER 5: CONTEXTUAL THEOLOGIES OF LIBERATION 
AND MALE DOMINATION IN LESOTHO........................................................................ 143 
5.1 Introduction........................................................................................................................ 143 
Part One: A history of the Encounter of Basotho Men with the European  
               Christian Missionaries.............................................................................................. 145 
5.2. A Competition of Discourses............................................................................................ 145 
5.2.1 Bohali and Lebollo under the missionary attack.......................................................... 146 


 
5.2.2 The lebollo institution as a religious symbol of resistance to Christian  
         religion.............................................................................................................................. 148 
5.2.3 Marriage by cattle (bohali) as a religious symbol of resistance to  
        Christian religion.............................................................................................................. 150 
5.3 Power Struggle in the Encounter between Christian Missionaries and  
      Basotho Men........................................................................................................................ 150 
5.3.1 A woman in a male resistance movement...................................................................... 156 
5.3.2 The Reflecting Team........................................................................................................ 162 
5.3.3 „Mantsopa caught up in the dynamics of male power.................................................. 164  
5.4 The Ambiguity of Religion: A Force of Domination or Resistance?.............................. 165 
5.5 The Encounter between the Christian Missionaries and the Basotho:  
      A historical condition for understanding debates on gender relations  
      in Lesotho............................................................................................................................. 168 
5.6 Summary.............................................................................................................................. 171 


Download 4.8 Kb.

Do'stlaringiz bilan baham:
  1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   ...   28




Ma'lumotlar bazasi mualliflik huquqi bilan himoyalangan ©fayllar.org 2020
ma'muriyatiga murojaat qiling