Domaine le roc des anges, roussillon


Download 6.21 Mb.
Pdf ko'rish
bet13/87
Sana21.11.2017
Hajmi6.21 Mb.
1   ...   9   10   11   12   13   14   15   16   ...   87

TERROIR D’ANIANE 

Continued… 

 

The mysteries remain, 



I keep the same 

cycle of seed-time 

and of sun and rain; 

Demeter in the grass, 

I multiply, 

renew and bless 

Bacchus in the vine; 

I hold the law, 

I keep the mysteries true, 

the first of these 

to name the living, dead; 

I am the wine and bread. 

I keep the law, 

I hold the mysteries true, 

I am the vine, 

the branches, you 

and you. 

 

Hilda Doolittle



 

 

 



 

 

Vineyards and garrigue 

 

Older vintages of Gassac… 

 

It is said that the red wines of Gassac begin precociously; despite the powerful tannins, the elegance of the fruit certainly makes them a 

pleasure to drink in the first year or so after release. Then, as with any great wine, comes a period of dormancy, perhaps three to five 

years, whilst the wine settles, matures and evolves. As anyone who has tasted verticals of the Gassac reds back to the 80s will attest, these 

wines have magnificent ageing potential and not only is the structure and balance evident, but the garrigue flavours become more 

pronounced, amply demonstrating that the wines are truly are product of their unique natural environment. 

 

2012 


MAS DE DAUMAS GASSAC ROUGE 

 



2007 

MAS DE DAUMAS GASSAC ROUGE- special release – stored in Gassac cellars 

 

2006 



MAS DE DAUMAS GASSAC ROUGE  

 



1995 

MAS DE DAUMAS GASSAC ROUGE  

 

1990 



MAS DE DAUMAS GASSAC ROUGE 

 



 

These vintages are only indicative. Other vintages may be available on request. 

 

 - 54 - 


 

 

 



 

LIMOUX, COTES DE MALEPERE & CABARDES 

 

 



This part of the Languedoc is centred around the city of Carcassonne and its spectacular medieval citadel. To the south west is the town of 

Limoux with its tradition of sparkling wines: Blanquette and Cremant de Limoux. The traditional grape variety here is Mauzac  but more 

recently Chenin, Chardonnay and red varieties have been planted. Blanquette is claimed as the oldest sparkling wine in France, predating 

Dom Perignon’s happy accident by about half a century. The still wine whites of Limoux were given AOC status in 1993. The variety of 

microclimates and aspects has led to the definition of four different zones: Autan, Oceanique, Mediterranean and Haute-Vallée. This is a 

comparatively small region, although each of the sub-zones displays markedly different characteristics. The Cave Cooperative de Limoux 

is responsible for about three quarters of the production in the area; as well as making sparkling wines they produce Chardonnay from the 

four climats. The Haute-Vallée, from vines grown at 450m in altitude, reveals the tightest structure with marked acidity and the greatest 

ageing potential, and is, to coin a cliché, Burgundian. 

 

The Côtes de la Malepère is at the frontier of the Languedoc and Aquitaine, what the French call le partage des eaux, the watershed between 



the Atlantic and the Mediterranean. As Rosemary George writes in her excellent book “The Wines of the South of France” the vineyards 

are “a melting pot of grape varieties… Midi mingling with Bordeaux”. Climatically, the Malepère has more affinity to the Atlantic, although 

the vegetation is mixed as is the terroir ranging from sandstone terraces of glacial origin, to slopes of clay and limestone  to gravel. The 

primary grape varieties are Merlot, Malbec and Cinsault; Cab Franc, Cab Sauv and Grenache Noir are also present. Certainly, the Bordeaux 

varieties seem to be gaining favour at the expense of the Languedoc ones. The wines from this area of are good inexpensive examples of 

wannabe claret (though why  would you wannabe claret)  with sweet ripe fruit  flavours, graceful pepperiness and quenchworthy acidity. 

That’s the sort of Cabernet Franc that wins instant converts. Try it with lentils with bacon or cassoulet. 

 

Accorded appellation status in 1998 Cabardès lies north-west of Carcassonne and is separated from the Minervois by the river Orbiel. 



This climate is locally described as vent d’est, vent d’ouest, where soft and cool Atlantic winds blend with the heat of the Mediterranean 

sun, where wheat is grown in the west and where lavender and thyme flourish in the south, where Bordeaux grape varieties live alongside 

those of the Languedoc. The name Cabardès originates from Cathar times referring to the local lords of Cabaret who defended Château de 

Lastours against Simon de Montfort in the 13

th

 century. 



 

 

 



 

 

 



TOQUES ET CLOCHERS, LES CAVES DU SIEUR D’ARQUES, Limoux 

We call the Chardonnay our “petit Meursault”. The elevage of the wine is in new oak, which confers complex flavours 

of melted butter, nuts, caramel and toast. There is also a delicious lemony twist in the finish. Yet another wine where 

the accent is on terroir and minimal intervention. Ages wonderfully too. Watch out for the punt on this bottle, deep 

enough for a small sommelier to disappear into. The Toques et Clochers refers to an auction of exceptional barrels 

from the best parcelles on the Sunday before Easter every year. A gala dinner is cooked by a celebrity chef (hence the 

Toque – the chef’s traditional tall white hat) whilst the proceeds of the auction go to a different Limoux wine village 

each year – to be used for the restoration of its bell tower (the Clocher). 

 

2013 



LIMOUX CHARDONNAY, TOQUES ET CLOCHERS 

 



 

 

DOMAINE LES HAUTES TERRES, GILLES AZAM, Limoux - Organic 

Gilles Azzam comes from the village of Roquetaillade in the upper valley of the Aude in the Limoux zone. This is the foothills of the 

Pyrenees, climatically at the junction of the Atlantic and Mediterranean influences. The village nestles in an ampitheatre, the vines 

are on surrounding hills, some covered with garrigue, others covered in woods, dry on the one side, moist on the other. The soil is an 

ochre-coloured marly clay with sandstone containing plentiful fossils (this area was once under the sea). The organically-farmed 

Chardonnay vines are on north and north east facing slopes at between 450-600 metres, the better to preserve the natural acidity in 

the grapes. After cold settling the Chardonnay is fermented for a month in stainless tank before six months ageing in concrete vats. 

The malolactic is completed, the wine is bottled with a light filtration and a relaitvely low amount of sulphur added.  

 

NV 


JOSEPHINE CREMANT DE LIMOUX 

Sp 


 

2016 


VIN DE FRANCE BLANC « LES (H)AUTRES TERRES » 

 



2016 

MAXIME ROUGE 

 

 



 

Drinkers May Be Divided Into Four Classes – with apologies to Samuel Taylor Coleridge 

 

Sponges, who absorb all they drink, and return it nearly in the same state, only a little dirtied. 



 

Sand-glasses, who retain nothing, and are content to get through a bottle of wine for the sake of getting through the time. 

 

Strain-bags, who merely retain the dregs of what they drink. 



 

Mogul Diamonds, equally rare and valuable, who profit by what they drink, and enable others to profit by it also. 

 

 


 

 - 55 - 


 

 

FITOU 

 

 

In order for the wheel to turn, for life to be lived, impurities are needed, and the impurities of impurities in the soil, too, as is known, if it 



is to be fertile. Dissension, diversity, the grain of salt and mustard are needed… 

 

“French wines may be said but to pickle meat in the stomach, but this is the wine that digests, and doth not only breed good 



blood, but it nutrifieth also, being a glutinous substantial liquor; of this wine, if of any other, may be verified that merry 

induction: That good wine makes good blood, good blood causeth good humors, good humors cause good thoughts, good 

thoughts bring forth good works, good works carry a man to heaven, ergo, good wine carrieth a man to heaven.” 

 

James Howell (1594-1666) 



 

 

 



 

 

DOMAINE DE ROUDENE, BERNADETTE & JEAN-PIERRE FAIXO, Fitou  

In Occitan “fita” means border or frontier and Fitou sat on the border of France and Catalonia. The climate is 

Mediterranean with long hot summers and mild winters. The dry winds of the Pyrenees, like the Tramontana, help to 

make this region one of the driest in France. This is a land of magically shaped mountains, ravines, tablelands where 

shrubs scented with thyme and lavender grow, and the dizzy medieval citadels preside over an extraordinary 

countryside. Fitou, like other appellations, has a wonderful variety of landscapes, climbing from the sea and lagoons 

to the white schistous escarpments and the limestone plug of Mont Tauch. The wines show potential, although have yet 

to garner the critical plaudits of Minervois and Corbières, for example. Gnarled Carignan and wizened Grenache rule 

the cépage roost here, with Syrah and a tad of Mourvèdre adding spike and length to the typical blend. Syrah is 

gaining ground in the hills; it contributes a flowery note with hints of red fruits and juniper.  

The AOC area includes wines from selected parcels of the communes Fitou, Cascatel, Caves-de-Treilles, La Palme, 

Leucate, Paziols, Treilles, Tuchan en Villeneuve-des-Corbières. 

 

 Domaine de Roudène, located in the pretty village of Paziols, is divided into small parcels. Jean-Pierre is trying to 



rationalise the estate by inducing other growers to exchange bits of land for his own, but as Paul Strang writes: “in a 

country where the ownership of a particular plot has a symbolic importance beyond the quality of the purpose to 

which it is put, progress is slow”. 

 

One superb wine from this consistent estate. The baby wine is from grapes grown on the terraces of argilo-calcaire 

and is a blend of Carignan (50%), Grenache (30%) and Syrah (20%). Everything is done traditionally; harvest is by 

hand when grapes have reached full phenolic maturity whilst a long cuvaison of twenty-one days and pigeage helps to 

extract all the aromatic components. The wine is bright and purple with blueish tints, with a fine complex nose of 

confit fruits, red and black berries suffused with peppery spices and notes of bay and clove. The feel of the wine in the 

mouth is fresh and lively and the tannins are fine and supple. And for food? Terrine of wild hare, persillade of cepes, 

boned baked shoulder of lamb, saltimbocca etc. 

 

2013 


FITOU, CUVEE JEAN DE PILA  

 



 

 

In Praise of Limestone – WH Auden 

 

…Mark these rounded slopes 



With their surface fragrance of thyme and beneath  

A secret system of caves and conduits 

That spurt everywhere with a chuckle 

Each filling a private pool for its fish and carving 

Its own little ravine whose cliffs entertain 

The butterfly and lizard… 

 


 

 - 56 - 


 

CORBIERES 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

CHATEAUX OLLIEUX ROMANIS, PIERRE BORIES, Corbières 

Corbières is the largest of the appellations in the Languedoc-Roussillon with a large number of cooperatives and hundreds of 

independent growers. The region enjoys a history that goes back to the Greek settlements in the second century BC. This is 

Cathar country with a vengeance. The legacy of that terrible conflict lives on today and there is strong sympathy for those 

early rebels who reflect so much of the Languedocian temperament. In case you think this is a digression there still remains a 

strong independent spirit. The riots of 1907 when the vignerons took on the government have been echoed down the ages since 

when desperate farmers have taken the law into their own hands to protect a heritage that is their livelihood. 

 

The Corbières region provides a diversity of terroirs and climates. In the Aude valley, from Lezignan and Boutenac westwards 



to Mont d’Alaric, the Carignan grape reigns supreme. The sheer diversity of the district and the designated eleven terroirs 

suggest that several crus will be created. Variety and contrast is noticeable also in the soil formation. The eruption of the 

Pyrenees has resulted in layers of different type of soil and subsoil. Erosion has contributed also. In the north there is red 

sandstone as well as pebbly terracing, while in the heart of the mountains there is marl as well as some shale, and, by the sea, 

coral-like chalk. The hot, dry climate ensures a long growing cycle for the vines, and the winds keep to a minimum the need 

for chemical treatments in the vineyard.  

A family owned vineyard for several generations Château Les Ollieux Romanis is in Montseret (renowned for honey flavoured 

with thyme, rosemary and lavender), situated in the heart of the Boutenac region, an area dedicated to the culture of the vine 

since Roman times. The vines are located on a sheltered hillside facing south east. The Cuvée Classique Rouge is a blend of 

Carignan, Grenache, Mourvèdre and Syrah from vines planted on hard red clay soil. The wine is fermented and then aged in 

tank for 12-18 months. Luscious red and black flavours are counterpointed by the drier garrigue notes of bayleaf and 

rosemary, as well as tobacco leaf and pepper. The Cuvée Classique Blanc is a mixture of Roussanne and Marsanne from 

yields of no more than 40hl/ha. Vinification is in tank with an upbringing in oak involving a period on the lees with regular 

batonnage. This yields intriguing flavours of orange blossom and exotic fruits, such as ripe banana, pineapple, lychee and 

papaya. A peculiar wine best enjoyed by a frumious bandersnatch after a hard day’s whiffling through a tulgey wood. The 

Cuvée Prestige Rouge from Carignan vines (up to 100 years old) plus the usual grape suspects (see Classique blend) has 

concentrated flavours of black cherries, cocoa butter, liquorice and balsam. Aged in wood for about fifteen months this 

Corbières is impressive in youth, but could happily snort awhile in the Seven Sleepers’ Den. 

 

“Lo Petit Fantet” is a blend of old vines Carignan with Syrah and Grenache grown on limestone-clay. After a carbonic 

maceration, vinification is in cement without sulphur using indigenous yeast. Cherry-red with violets glints Lo Petit has an 

intense nose with sweet raspberry and kirsch fruit, lovely balance despite its powerful alcohol and a herbal undertow. Try it 

chilled. 

  

The Alicante grape has virtually disappeared from France today. Its role formerly was as a Teinturier grape, to add 

colour to the pale, weak and wibbly vin de table plonk sloshing around the Midi. Nowadays it has acquired a weird 

cachet. Set aside your snotty wine prejudices; gaze deeply and adoringly into these atramentous depths and suck in 

that peppery mulberry fruit. The facts: manual harvesting, a meagre yield of 25 hectolitres per hectare and one 

hundred year old vines, a mere annual production of five hundred cases, pas de filtration or fining and we’ve copped 

the lot! The wine develops sensationally in the glass; the flavours seem to arch out across the palate. Biodynamics 

may literally be wired to the moon, but don’t knock it! Bouschet to leave you bouche-bée and the ultimate Aude-job! 

Finally the Atal Sia grown on the pudding stone (over sandstone) terroir of Boutenac is a lush confection of Carignan 

45%; Grenache 25%; Mourvèdre 25% and a dollop of Syrah for poke. No oak here yet this is still a deep and intense 

wine with black fruits, orange peel, spice and liquorice and a smooth, silky, almost sweet palate. 

 

These wines make me feel hungry. So here are some local dishes to play with. A garlicky calamari salad or bourride

 

(burbot, angler and cuttlefish cooked for ten minutes in sea water and thicken with aioli) would hit the mark with 



therosé, whilst the robust whites would cope well with a salt cod brandade or chicken sautéed with morels. The reds 

would go variously with Laguiole cheese, duck with orange, lamb stew, roast pigeon with peas or rabbit in chocolate 

sauce or a Roussillonnade of sausages and mushrooms grilled on pine cones. 

  

2016 


CORBIERES BLANC CUVEE CLASSIQUE 

 



2016 

CORBIERES ROUGE, CUVEE ALICE 

 

2016 



« LO PETIT FANTET DE L’HIPPOLYTE » 

 



2016 

CORBIERES ROUGE CUVEE CLASSIQUE 

 

2015 



CORBIERES-BOUTENAC ROUGE CUVEE PRESTIGE 

 



2014 

CORBIERES BOUTENAC “ATAL SIA” 

 

2016 



CORBIERES ROSE 

Ro 


 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 - 57 - 


MINERVOIS 

 

 



MINERVE 

 

A jutting outcrop of burnished stone blotted against the blue of the sky, perched like the ark of the deluge on the spur of a plateau, 



precarious on the brink of the twofold precipice of the Cesse and of the Brian, a village above and beyond the world, ruling with fierce 

pride over a desert of brush and stones, scarred with gorges, pitted with caves, dotted here and there with ancient dolmens and isolated 

farmsteads, a steep steppe where the sun strikes, incandescent, against the dreaming spires and where the cruel light plays strange tricks 

upon the eyes – mirages that recall to life the hunters of prehistory, the march of Roman legions, the sly shades of visigothic archdeacons 

and of rapacious feudaries, the fearful fires of a vengeful Simon de Monfort and the horrors of charring human flesh and yet, through the 

clouds of acrid smoke one can, it seems, descry the dulcet features of fair young damsels, sprung from the lays of Ramon de Miraval, and, 

in their midst, the manly form of Raymond Roger Trencavel. 

 

Adapted from Maurice Chauvet – Translated by David Bond 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

CLOS DE L’AZEROLLE (CHATEAU MIRAUSSE), RAYMOND JULIEN, Minervois  

Located in Badens due east of Carcassonne in the south west part of Minervois, Raymond Julien is a grower to watch. Le Clos 

de l’Azerolle is pure (and I mean pure) Carignan from fifty year old vines, sinewy yet supple, brambly chewy fruit with a most 

agreeable iron-earthiness. This is wine that sits up, barks and makes you take notice. Once you taste it you will buy it. One to 

stick your spurtle into. “Fruit to the fore and promising. Rich, dark berries and spice with sweet oak. Supple and full. Modern 

style but well done,” says Decanter awarding it four stars. All wines experience varying degrees of carbonic maceration.  

 

 

2016 

MINERVOIS, LE ROUGE DE L’AZEROLLE 



 

2015 



MINERVOIS, L’AZEROLLE VIEILLES VIGNES 

 



 

 

 



DOMAINE PIERRE CROS, Minervois 

Un caractère d’acier, un terroir de feu. 

 

Situated in Badens, a few kilometres from Carcassonne, the vineyards of Domaine Cros sit on the poorest of poor 

shallow stony argilo-calcaire soils so stark and inhospitable in certain places that only the vine and the olive tree can 

scratch an existence. The love of this arid terroir, where the drought seems more extreme than elsewhere, has induced 

Pierre Cros to preserve ancient parcels of Aramon (planted in 1930), Piquepoul Noir (1910), Alicante (1927) and 

Carignan (1910) alongside the more classic “noble” (parvenu) varieties of Syrah, Grenache and Mourvèdre. 

 

The Minervois tradition provides superb value for money. A more conventional blend of Grenache, Carignan and Syrah it 

yields sweet red fruits whilst retaining the warmth and herby grip of terroir. The Minervois Blanc is lovely – a field blend of 

Grenache Blanc, Vermentino, Muscat à Petit Grains and Piquepoul Blanc. Typically floral and resinous at the same time this 

white conjures dried apricots and plums sprinkled with garrigue notes of fennel and broom. The Minervois vieilles vignes is 

from vines nearly one hundred years old and is another reason why we shouldn’t pension off the Carignan grape.  

 

2016 


MINERVOIS BLANC “LES COSTES” 

 



2015 

MINERVOIS ROUGE TRADITION 

 

2015 



MINERVOIS ROUGE VIEILLES VIGNES 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 


1   ...   9   10   11   12   13   14   15   16   ...   87




Ma'lumotlar bazasi mualliflik huquqi bilan himoyalangan ©fayllar.org 2020
ma'muriyatiga murojaat qiling