Domaine le roc des anges, roussillon


CHATEAU DE JAU, FAMILLE DAURE, Rivesaltes


Download 6.21 Mb.
Pdf ko'rish
bet17/87
Sana21.11.2017
Hajmi6.21 Mb.
1   ...   13   14   15   16   17   18   19   20   ...   87

 

CHATEAU DE JAU, FAMILLE DAURE, Rivesaltes 

The Muscat de Rivesaltes is a grapey delight with extra concentration from skin contact and mutage sur marc. This should be 

drunk very chilled, either as an aperitif, or with fruit or creamy desserts! 

 

2015 


MUSCAT DE RIVESALTES – 50 cl 

Sw 


 

2007 


RIVESALTES AMBRE – 50cl 

Sw 


 

 

 



 

DOMAINE BRUNO DUCHENE, Collioure – Organic 

Bruno Duchene, an energetic vigneron moved from the Loir-et-Cher to the Roussillon and is now based in Banyuls-sur-Mer. 

His vines are on the steep hills overlooking the sea and worked by horse and human. He works biodynamically and the red 

varieties are Grenache Noir and a little Carignan. La Luna is from several parcels of vines averaging 35-40 years old and 

undergoes a semi-carbonic maceration. Pigeage and remontage is according to the nature of vintage. The wine is full-bodied 

with warm strawberry and cherry cola aromas and confit fruits on the palate. The La Pascole (AOC Collioure) is from older 

vines (80 years), is vinified in a similar fashion but spends seven months in used barriques. It has greater intensity, but is still 

a thoroughly elegant and tonic wine. 

Vall’Pompo is the lesser-seen Collioure Blanc, all poached pear ripeness on the surface with a slew of grapefruit undertow 

from the Grenache Gris (old vines). 

 

2015 


COLLIOURE BLANC “VALL POMPO” 

 



2015 

COTE VERMEILLE “LA LUNA” 

 

2015 



COTE VERMEILLE ROUGE « LA LUNA » - magnum 

 



2015 

COLLIOURE “LA PASCOLE” 

 

 



 

 

 - 72 - 


 

 

 



 

ROUSSILLON

 

Continued… 

 

Carignan – so many prestigious wine writers (you know who you are) have had to gnaw the numble entrails of what they have written 

regarding this grape. Previously dismissed as “a workhorse variety”; “not capable of greatness”; “should be grubbed up in favour of 

Syrah”; “the bane of the European wine industry” and “only distinguished by its disadvantages”, it is now perceived as one of the 

signature grapes of the Languedoc-Roussillon, lending terroir character to blends, or standing out in its own right by expressing uniquely 

bold flavours. As Marjorie Gallet and Tom Lubbe illustrate magnificently it is not necessary to subject this grape to carbonic maceration 

to smooth out the rough edges and highlight the fruit: the same effect can be achieved by naturally low yields, gentle extraction and 

traditional vinification techniques. Carignan is a more efficient vehicle for terroir than Syrah and Grenache particularly on the poor 

schistous soils (worked by maso-schistes) that characterise much of the Roussillon and eastern Languedoc. As Andrew Jefford writes in 

The New France: “The greatest wines of the Languedoc never taste easy or comfortable; they taste as if handfuls of stones had been 

stuffed in a liquidiser and ground down to a dark pulp with bitter cherries, dark plums, firm damsons and tight sloes.” Carbonic 

maceration can, nevertheless, delightfully soothe the sauvage grain. Take Raymond Julien’s Clos de l’Azerolle. This is 100% Carignan, 

high-toned, smooth, silky and linear with superb poise. The grape variety is in no way compromised by the vinification and reveals that 

exhilarating freshness and fine structure are not mutually exclusive notions. Carignan really flourishes in Corbières, particularly in the 

zone of Boutenac which is a chaotic mixture of sandstone, schist, limestone and marl. La Forge, a tiny parcel of 100-year-old vines owned 

by Gérard Bertrand, is a notable amalgam of power and finesse, old-fashioned respect for terroir and grape allied to scientific know-how. 

Carignan is also being heavily promoted in neighbouring Fitou (a geological scrapyard – Jefford) – once again old vines provide the 

blood of the wine. Of course, Carignan is most often tasted in blends with Syrah, Grenache, Mourvèdre and Cinsault. Two viewpoints: 

firstly, the desire to express local terroir by using traditionally cultivated varieties, and, secondly, the incorporation into appellation rules 

of a higher proportion of “noble” varieties (in particular Syrah and Mourvèdre). The theological debate will run for centuries; what is not 

in doubt is the resurrection, or rather the establishment of Carignan’s status as a grape capable of producing serious, challenging and 

rather wonderful wines, a fact that mirrors the rise of the reputation of the Languedoc-Roussillon. 

 

 



LES CAVES DE CARIGNAN – THE UNUSUAL SUSPECTS 

 

Fitou, Domaine de Roudène – 50% Carignan (Grenache/Syrah). 50-100 year old vines, traditional vinification. Used oak 

Corbières, Domaine Ollieux Romanis – 40-60% Carignan (depending on cuvée) 50-100 year old vines. 12-18 months in barrel 

Minervois, Clos de l’Azerolle – 100% Carignan vines; 50 years old; carbonic maceration; stainless steel fermentation 

Minervois Rouge Vieilles Vignes, Pierre Cros – 100% Carignan; 105 year old vines; carbonic maceration 

Rendez-Vous La Lune, Clos du Gravillas – Carignan, Syrah, Cab Sauv; 90-year-old vines; stainless steel fermentation 

Lo Vielh, Clos du Gravillas – 100% Carignan, 100 + year old vines, large oak barrels 

Saint-Chinian, La Laouzil, Domaine Thierry Navarre – Old Carignan, Grenache, Syrah – 600 litre demi-muid 

Faugères Tradition, Domaine Didier Barral – 60% Carignan; old vines; cement and old wood 

Faugères, Domaine du Météore – 40+% Carignan (Syrah, Mourvèdre, Grenache); 40+ year-old vines; carbonic maceration; elevage 

in old wood 

Côtes du Roussillon Villages, Domaine Le Roc des Anges – 30% Carignan (Grenache/Syrah); 80+ year-old-vines; fermented in 

concrete, aged in foudres 

Matassa Rouge, Cotes Catalanes – 100% Carignan, 120 year old vines, naturally fermented in cement 

Frida, Côtes du Roussillon, Domaine des Foulards Rouges – 50% Carignan, 50% Grenache – 80 year old vines, tank fermented 

Carignano, Ampeleia, Costa Toscana – 100% Carignan - cement 

Carignan Reserva, Villalobos – 100% Carignan, 70 year old vines, wild vines 

Populis Carignane, Living Wines Collective – 100% Carignan, 70 year old vines, tank and barrel 

 

 

 



 

 

DOMAINE LES TERRES DE FAGAYRA, Maury – Organic 



Les Terres de Fagayra is exclusively dedicated to the making of fortified wines with personality. The estate lies on three 

hectares of old vines located at the north border of the Maury appellation. In these wild lands nestled at the bottom of a 

limestone cliff, rain is more frequent and temperature is lower; two climatic conditions that give elegant and balanced grapes. 

Two soils are present: pure schist and schist with limestone sediments. Root systems are deep. The white Maury is a blend of 

Grenache Gris and Maccabeu on pure schist and limestone. The wine is aged for seven months in vat and then for a further 

four in bottle. The nose first reveals exotic and white fruit aromas followed by mineral notes upon further aeration. Serve with 

tuna sashimi. 

 

 The red is old vines Grenache Noir grown on schist with limestone sediments. After a wild yeast ferment the wine is aged in 

stainless steel for seven months and a further four in bottle. A nose of dried red flowers and dried figs leads to an intense, full-

bodied palate with a delicate, chalky, mineral palate. Enjoy with most cheeses and chocolate.  

 

 

2016 


MAURY BLANC 

Sw 


 

2015 


MAURY ROUGE 

Sw 


 

 

 



 

 - 73 - 


 

 

 



 

ROUSSILLON 

Continued… 



 

 

 



DOMAINE MAS AMIEL, OLIVIER DECELLE, Maury – Organic 

Maury is surrounded by the Rivesaltes appellation. The mountains to the north denote the end of Corbières and of the Aude 

department. Maury is thus in Pyrenees-Orientales and thus Catalan in nature. As Paul Strang vividly writes: “It lives in the 

shadow of the Cathar stronghold of Quéribus, the massive profile of whose tower dominates the landscape for miles around. If 

you come down from these heights the soil suddenly changes. Everywhere there is black schist, sometimes as dark as coal; the 

vines brilliant green, their tufts flowing freely in the Tramontane wind, looks as if they have been planted in the ashes of the 

Cathar martyrs who were burnt alive for their faith in the mountains of the South”. 

 

The story of Mas Amiel begins in 1816 when Raymond Amiel won the deeds to the property from the Bishop of Perpignan in a 

game of cards. If the game were poker this would be quite a story – if you believe it – but what makes this event all the more 

remarkable is that the two were actually playing an early version of the classic card game ‘Old Maid’. If only fate had taken a 

different turn that night, the bishop would have paired Monsieur & Madame Raisin the winemakers, Amiel would have been 

left, red-faced, holding the Old Maid, and the property in question would have fallen to the church. But thankfully there was 

no divine intervention on the night. The bishop left, fleeced of what could have been a prime source of communion wine, and 

Mas Amiel was born. After a chequered career the estate was purchased by a Charles Dupuy who cultivated it until his death 

in 1916. Charles’s son, Jean took over and started to produce high quality wine under the Mas Amiel label. He extended the 

vineyard, digging up the hillside to plant new vines. 

 

The Maury Blanc is from old Grenache Gris vines on schistous slopes. Yields are a miserly 15hl/ha, Vinification is at 18c 

followed by a mutage to adjust the alcohol. The wine is then aged in tank on the fine lees. It has a beautiful limpid colour with 

hints of green and a mineral stone evoking warm stones and orange blossom which develops further with aeration to unveil 

fresh brioche and pollen. In the mouth it is lively, round and supple and unleashes panoply of flavours: boxwood, star fruit, 

mandarin and juniper to name but few.

 

Thon mi cuit au sel de Guérande et fenouil, langouste tiède aux agrumes, soupe de 

fruits blancs au gingembre



 

The Maury Rouge is made in the same style as the rimage wines of Banyuls. From 100% Grenache Noir grown on the south-

facing broken schists and marne soils and yields of 25 hl/ha, the grapes are subsequently sorted, destemmed and vinified in 

the normal way. The alcohol is added while the wine is still in the vat (mutage sur les grains), which slows down the final 

fermentation, allowing a longer period of maceration and thereby conferring greater richness. This Maury is ruby with violet 

tints and the nose eloquently expresses framboise, cherry and crème-de-cassis. It is smooth in the mouth, the red fruits 

reinforced by bitter chocolate and spice as well as fine tannins. 

  

2014 


MAURY VINTAGE BLANC 

Sw 


 

2014 


MAURY VINTAGE ROUGE 

Sw 


 

 

 



 

Marjorie Gallet of Roc des Anges avec le pooch 

 


 

 - 74 - 


 

TERROIR: The Soil & The Soul. Two Vignerons Explain… 

 

Tell me where is terroir bred 



Or in the heart or in the head? 

How begot, how nourished? 

 

In a recent paper Randall Grahm wrote: “Terroir is a composite of many physical factors – soil structure and composition, topography, 



exposition, micro-climate as well as more intangible cultural factors. Matt Kramer once very poetically defined terroir as “somewhere-

ness,” and this I think is the nub of the issue. I believe that “somewhereness” is absolutely linked to beauty and that beauty reposes in the 

particulars; we love and admire individuals in a way that we can never love classes of people or things. Beauty must relate to some sort of 

internal harmony; the harmony of a great terroir derives, I believe, from the exchange of information between the vine-plant and its 

milieu over generations. The plant and the soil have learned to speak each other’s language, and that is why a particularly great terroir 

wine seems to speak with so much elegance.”  

 

Continues Grahm: “A great terroir is the one that will elevate a particular site above that of its neighbours. It will ripen its grapes more 



completely more years out of ten than its neighbours; its wines will tend to be more balanced more of the time than its unfortunate 

contiguous terroir. But most of all, it will have a calling card, a quality of expressiveness, of distinctiveness that will provoke a sense of 

recognition in the consumer, whether or not the consumer has ever tasted the wine before.” 

 

Expressiveness, distinctiveness: words that should be more compelling to wine lovers than opulent, rich or powerful. He is talking about 



wines that are unique, wherein you can taste a different order of qualities, precisely because they encapsulate the multifarious differences 

of their locations. Grahm, like so many French growers, posits that the subtle secrets of the soil are best unlocked through biodynamic 

viticulture: “Biodynamics is perhaps the most straightforward path to the enhanced expression of terroir in one’s vineyard. Its express 

purpose is to wake up the vines to the energetic forces of the universe, but its true purpose is to wake up the biodynamicist himself or 

herself.”  

 

Olivier Pithon articulates a similar holistic credo. “I discovered… the sensitivity to how wines can become pleasure, balance and lightness. 



The love of a job well done, the precision in the choice of interventions, the importance of tasting during the production of wines and the 

respect for the prime material, are vital. It may sound silly, but it’s everything you didn’t learn at school that counts. We never learn that it’s 

essential to make wines which you love. They never speak to you about poetry, love and pleasure. It seems natural to me to have a cow, a 

mare and a dog for my personal equilibrium and just as naturally comes the profound desire and necessity to fly with my own wings or to 

look after my own vines. Ever since then, I’ve had only one desire: to give everything to my vines so that then they give it back in their 

grapes and in my wine. You must be proud and put your guts, your sweat, your love, your desires, your joy and your dreams into your wine. 

Growing biologically was for me self evident, a mark of respect, a qualitative requirement and a choice of life style. It’s economically 

irrational for a young enterprise like mine but I don’t know any other way to be than wholly generous and natural. 

 

I don’t do anything extraordinary. I work. I put on the compost. I use sulphur against the vine mildew and an infusion of horse tail for the 



little mildew that we have. This remains a base. As time goes by, through reading, exchanging ideas, wine tasting and other experiences, the 

wish to take inspiration from the biodynamic comes naturally. Silica and horn dung (501 and 500) complete the infusions of horse tail, fern 

and nettles which I use. My goal is to make the wine as good as possible by getting as much out of the soil as I can, whilst respecting our 

environment and considering the problem of leaving to generations to come healthy soil: “We don’t inherit the land of our ancestors; we lend 

it to our children”.” 

 

Terroir – because one word is so freighted with meaning, because the critics perceive it as a “concept” appropriated by the French (the 



word is French after all, and a reflexive mot-juste!) and given a quasi-mystical, pantheistic spin, people will argue in ever-decreasing 

circles whether it is fact – or fiction. Who deniges of it? As Mrs Gamp might enquire. If you are a New World winemaker the word may 

have negative connotations insofar as it may be used as an alibi (by the French mainly) covering for lack of fruit or bad winemaking 

technique. The same people believe that terroir is solely associated with nostalgia for old-fashioned wines and a chronic resistance to new 

ideas. This is a caricature of the idea (terroir is not an idea), as if the term was invented to endorse the singular superiority of European 

growers. It is not old-fashioned to pursue distinctiveness by espousing minimal intervention in the vineyard and the winery, rather it 

denotes intelligence that if you’ve been given beautiful, healthy grapes that you translate their potential into something fine and natural

It is not old-fashioned to talk about spirit, soul, essence, harmony and individuality in wine even though these qualities cannot be 

measured with callipers. The biodynamic movement in viticulture and the Slow Food philosophy are progressive in their outlook and 

approach. Underpinning all their ideas are the notions of sustainability, ethical farming and achieving purity of flavour through fewer 

interventions. And so we return to the matter of taste. We say, as an intellectual truth, that every country or region naturally has its own 

terroir; however, not every vigneron has an intuitive understanding of it and, as a result of too many interventions – the better to create a 

wine that conforms to international models – the wine itself becomes denatured, emasculated and obvious. Eben Sadie, a South African 

vigneron, articulates his concern about interventionist winemaking: ‘I don’t like the term “winemaker” at all’, he explains. ‘Until recently 

it didn’t exist: now we live in a world where we “make” wines’. Eben continues, ‘to be involved with a great wine is to remove yourself 

from the process. In all the “making” the virtue of terroir is lost’. The final word goes to Samuel Guibert: “Firstly, you should remember 

that we do not make the wines. Nature makes the wines; in our case the Gassac (valley) makes the wines. And every year it is different. 

We have to remember to be humble before Nature.” Terroir is about such respect for nature; you can obviously force the wine to obey a 

taste profile by artificial means and it will taste artificial. The great growers want to be able to identify Matt Kramer’s “somewhereness” 

in their wines, the specific somewhereness of the living vineyard. Yes, these wines have somewhat of the something from a particular 

somewhere, or to put it more reductively, they taste differently real. And we love ‘em! 

 


 

 - 75 - 


RHONE 

 

“It is sad that few people understand naturally made individual wines. Technology has progressed to the point that far too 

many wines lack the taste of the place of their origin and resemble one another. Terroir, more than anything, is an 

expression of finesse and complexity.” - Gérard Chave 

(as quoted in Robert Parker’s Wines of the Rhône Valley, 1998 edition)

  

Green Harvesting – Chuck Berries 

 

The Rhône presents a bit of a problem at the moment. There 



are some excellent wines at the cheaper end, but when you 

move into the top villages, only relatively small quantities 

from a handful of growers are available (such is the demand) 

and even those wines tend to be too young to drink. 

Nevertheless, we are able to offer a good selection of growers 

on top of their form. At one end of the spectrum is Jacques 



Mestre, whom we are determined to elevate to cult status – if 

you wish to taste great mature winter-warming Châteauneuf 

submit your taste buds to his vintages from the mid 1990s. In 

terms of vintages it is often a boon to be behind the times! 



Clos Saint-Michel meanwhile has furnished us with a white 

and red Châteauneuf of supreme quality. Fierce power and 

easy pleasure coexist harmoniously; warm waves of exotic 

flavour lavish the taste buds. Domaine La Barroche

meanwhile make opulent, spicy CNdP which has garnered 

rave reviews. 

 

From old spices to baby spices. In the past couple of years Guy 



de Mercurio and François Collard have surpassed themselves 

at  Château  Saint-Cyrgues  and  Château  Mourgues  du  Grès 

respectively, so we strongly suggest you get your Rhône gear 

from the Gard. For value for money the  Gard est le lieu and 

miles better than most of that attenuated slop that masquerades 

under the Côtes-du-Rhône appellation. At the modern end of 

the spectrum the lush, plummy Ventoux wines of Domaine de 

Fondrèche  reveal  intense  fruitiness  underpinned  by  striking 

minerality. This estate has taken the appellation to a new level. 

Our  quartet  of  southern  Ardèchois  producers:  Vigneaux

Azzoni,  Mazel  and  Mas  de  Libian  are  disarmingly  natural  – 

fruit and more fruit with earth and stone. Our L’Ard des Choix. 

 

 

 

  



 

Of the various villages, Rasteau, just north of Gigondas, provides 

us with a sumptuous Châteauneuf-manqué from Didier Charavin

From  Gigondas  itself  Clos  du  Joncuas  is  a  wonderfully 

unpretentious Grenache-based wine, its earthy purity a testament 

to the benefits of no holds-barred organic viticulture. It’s not only 

a wine with nowt taken out; you’d swear they’d put things back in. 

Two contrasting wines from Vacqueyras: in the traditional corner 

a  warming  gravy-browning  brew  from  Domaine  La  Garrigue

from Clos Montirius, a red berry Syrah-rich smoothie, given the 

complete biodynamic makeover (the full Montirius).  

 

As  usual  there  will  be  local  microclimatic  triumphs  and  mini-



disasters – the diurnal rhythm of the vigneron. The 2010s, north 

and south, look consistently strong, revealing good concentration 

and  structure.  09  –  as  elsewhere  in  France  –  was  a  hot  vintage, 

better for Grenache than Syrah normally.  

 

A Dance To The Music of Thyme 

 

As mentioned elsewhere we are particularly fond of the underrated 



Grenache grape  which seems to  soak up the heat of the sun and 

express  the  flavours  of  the  soil  to  such  good  effect.  Many 

modernists wish to use new oak or a higher proportion of Syrah or 

extract  greater  colour.  This  might  smoothen  some  of  the  rough 

edges,  but  would  surely  stifle  the  unique  signature  of  these 

wonderful southern Rhône red wines.

 

 



Download 6.21 Mb.

Do'stlaringiz bilan baham:
1   ...   13   14   15   16   17   18   19   20   ...   87




Ma'lumotlar bazasi mualliflik huquqi bilan himoyalangan ©fayllar.org 2020
ma'muriyatiga murojaat qiling