Domaine le roc des anges, roussillon


Download 6.21 Mb.
Pdf ko'rish
bet20/87
Sana21.11.2017
Hajmi6.21 Mb.
1   ...   16   17   18   19   20   21   22   23   ...   87

 

  

 

 



DOMAINE LES MAOU, VINCENT GARRETA, Ventoux- Organic 

These wines are really cool climate Ventoux labelled as Vins de France because their alcohol level is too low. The Au P’tit 

Bonheur Rouge is a 100% Cinsault foules with 30mg/l of sulphites à l’encuvage, then no sulphite in vinification until 15mg/l 

at bottling. Vaste Programme is a Carignan with carbonic maceration blended with Aubun (apparently, an old type of 

Carignan) foule, with short maceration and no sulphites until 15mg/l at bottling. 

 

2014 


AU P’TIT BONHEUR 

 



2014 

VASTE PROGRAMME 

 

 



 

 - 85 - 


 

 

CHATEAU VALCOMBE, LUC & CENDRINE GUERNARD, Ventoux- Organic 

Situated in the foothills of Mont Ventoux Château Valcombe" covers 28 hectares. Luc and Cendrine (and their team) are 

ecologically minded, respectful and aware of the natural assets of the terroir. The vines are supported by a high wooden 

trellis. The labour is traditional, without using chemicals. Leaf removal, destemming are performed manually and there is no 

pollarding of the vines. The average age of the vineyard is of more than 50 years, the resulting wines are powerful with all the 

energy focused in a few grapes. The vineyard surrounds the gravity cellar of the domaine. The grapes do not have far to travel 

after harvesting so they do not get crushed and thus the aromas are allowed to develop fully. 

The wines mature in barrels of 400 and 600 litres until ready for bottling. Nothing is rushed.  

 

Cinq Puits comes from a vineyard situated in the town of Mazan, on south east facing slopes on clay and limestone soils. The 

blend is 70% Grenache, 15% Syrah and 5% Carignan, all old vines and all manually debudded with green harvest. Grapes 

are handpicked. The wines are matured in “demi muids” used six times previously. Bright cherry red with ripe fruits the wine 

has discreet aromas of undergrowth and warm brick. In the mouth this Ventoux red is fleshy yet elegant with aromas of kirsch, 

raspberry, cherry and dark chocolate and some roasted notes. The peppery finish binds the whole.  

 

Epicure Rouge comes from a vineyard situated in the town of St Pierre de Vassols, at an altitude of 250 metres, on north-west 

slopes, facing the Dentelles de Montmirail. The soil is clay, limestone and sand based, grey-brown with a yellowish hue, 

pebbly and gravelly. The silt lies on dark ochre fine sand which itself lies on gravels. Some areas sit on oxidised gravels. The 

blend here is 60% Grenache, 25% Carignan and 15% Syrah. The winemaking process involves racking and returning with 

maturing on the lees in concrete tanks. Predominant notes of ripe fruit, cherry, in the mouth the wine is unctuous and round 

yet perfectly balanced with freshness, great structure and smooth tannins on the finish. The aromatic palate spreads from ripe 

fruit to more aromatic liquorice flavours finishing with notes of stone and plum. 

 

2014 


CINQ PUITS 

 



2014 

EPICURE ROUGE 

 

 



 

 

Biodynamics – Earth Calling 

 

Of course, I don’t believe in it. But I understand that it brings you luck whether you believe in it or not. (Niels Bohr on a horseshoe nailed 



to his wall.) 

 

Biodynamics goes a step further than organic farming although it shares many of the practical approaches. It assumes philosophical 

holism, articulating almost animistic and Gaian values and allies to it its own scientific analysis and observation. I think science is too 

often confused with technology: its applications might be represented in the metaphor of a pill. What the pill contains is a chemical 

solution to a problem that tends, by definition, to be a short term one. There may be alternative therapies such as acupuncture or 

homeopathic remedies which may achieve the same effect as the pill. Faith-healing and hypnosis can alleviate certain illnesses because 

they can stimulate the brain to send out signals to create antibodies. Biodynamics starts from a different perspective and posits a unified 

methodology insofar as it is not treating the vine as a patient but creating a healthy environment for the vine to exist in. Rather than being 

a reactive form of farming, it is prescient, intuitive and intelligent. 

 

Incorporated within this philosophy are such diverse matters as the importance of a planting calendar, seasonal tasks, epedaphic 

conditions, the waxing of the moon (and how it corresponds to high pressure) and the role of wild yeasts. The dynamic of the vineyard 

mirrors all the cycles. The seasons are a necessary part of the great natural balance, the constant process of decomposition, dormancy and 

recomposition. Nature is about a series of transformations, and biodynamics analyses the different states and exchanges of matter and 

energy that operate in the growth of the vine: between the mineral and the roots; the water and the leaf; light and the flower; heat and the 

fruit, a series of metamorphoses which can be seen not as different states, but ascendant and descendant ones. This is a radical way of 

looking at plants (although it was proposed by Goethe as early as the 1800s before being elaborated by Rudolph Steiner and Maria Thun.) 

 

The vineyard then is worked through the cycles of natural peaks and troughs. Autumn, the time of decomposition, the sun in its 



descendant phase, is marked by the use of compost and diverse animal and vegetable preparations to nourish the soil. Spring witnesses the 

time of regeneration, photosynthesis, the ascendant sun, and crystalline formation. All activities in the vineyard will mirror these rhythms. 

The lunar calendar meanwhile is used as a timetable indicating when is the best time to prune vines or to rack the wine from barrel to 

barrel. 


 

Is biodynamic wine better? Perhaps this is not the question we should be asking. Andrew Jefford quotes Nicolas Joly’s credo: “Avant 



d’etre bon, un vin doit etre vrai”; in other words a wine should ultimately be true to itself – this is the “morality of terroir.” Biodynamic 

viticulture is the ultimate endeavour to realise terroir. 

 

For an in-depth analysis of the philosophy and methodology of biodynamics Monty Waldin’s Biodynamic Wines published by Mitchell 



Beazley is an invaluable guide. 

 

 



 

 

 - 86 - 


SOUTHERN RHONE 

Continued… 

 

 

CLOS DU JONCUAS, FERNAND CHASTAN, Gigondas – Organic  

WHERE’S THE BEEF? Asked an American president famously. Well, it all went into this particular wine – lock, two stock 

tablets & smoking gravy essence not to mention a fine additional cultural whiff of death-in-venison.  

It is a pleasure to find a grower who can achieve aroma, power yet finesse and elegant fruit in a wine. Although weighing in 

at a hefty (and, for Gigondas, seemingly mandatory) 13.5%, this Gig. Compared favourably in a tasting against the fiercely 

tannic monsterpieces from the apellation, and, with a touch of bottle age, is drinking really beautifully now. 

From a terraced vineyard, this is a blend of Grenache (80%) the remainder being equal parts Mourvèdre and Syrah. The 

grapes are harvested at the beginning of October, trodden in the traditional way, and, after a cuvaison of 18 days and regular 

remontage, the wine is put into foudres. No filtration, nor fining, from the vineyard where strictly organic practices are 

observed to the sympathetic treatment in the winery, this is southern Rhône red at its purest. 

 

2005 


GIGONDAS 

 



 

 

 



DOMAINE JACQUES MESTRE, CHRISTOPHE MESTRE, Châteauneuf-du-Pape  

 

One cannot be precise and still be pure – Marc Chagall 



 

Cue Ennio Morricone music: this is the domaine with no name. Consult the guidebooks and you will find a glorious 

blank. 

Old-fashioned Châteauneuf from a quirky grower who ages his wines in enormous oak foudres and releases them to order. 

The soil is pebbly red clay with galets (pudding stones). Green harvesting in the vineyard, lutte raisonnée, organic viticulture 

and low yields (below 35hl/ha) help provide the raw ingredients. 

 

 The blend is reassuringly southern Rhône: 60% Grenache, 10% Syrah, 10% Mourvèdre and 5% Cinsault and the 

remaining odds and curious sods making up a baker’s dozen à la Château Beaucastel. The 2010, a superlative vintage 

in Châteauneuf, has the usual animal aromas, game-and-gravy, plus olives, tamarinds, oranges and a mahogany 

smoothness derived from maturity, in other words, a right old roister-doisterer.  

With heart, mind and lots of body – a really pukka wine as a formerly young TV chef might say. Buy some now – for 

now – and buy some now – for later – it’s got legs to burn. Recent vintages see a touch more Syrah and have a topuch 

more backbone as a result. They still march to the drum of sun and the garrigue. 

 

2012 


CHATEAUNEUF-DU-PAPE, CUVEE DES SOMMELIERS 

 



2012 

CHATEAUNEUF-DU-PAPE, CUVEE DES SOMMELIERS – ½ bottle 

 

2013 



CHATEAUNEUF-DU-PAPE, CUVEE DES SOMMELIERS – magnum 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

CLOS SAINT-MICHEL, OLIVIER & FRANCK MOUSSET, Châteauneuf-du-Pape 

The red is a chewy Châteauneuf with smoky roasted meat character, black cherries and kirsch, pepper, herbs (bayleaf, 

rosemary) glycerine fruit. Rich, deep and generous, with a compelling sweetness of fruit and a lush, pliant texture. 

Finishes with firm but sweet tannins and a note of dark chocolate.

 

This estate destems about 50% of its grapes, aims 



for high extraction and ages in foudres for about 12-16 months. If you seek characterful Côtes-du-Rhône in the 

embryonic “Neuf” idiom then the supple Mathilde, (80% Grenache, 20% Syrah from 15-40 year old vines) all juicy 

jammy fruits (strawberry, plum and orange) with a hint of bitter olive, delivers the smoky bacon. The white 

Châteauneuf is just sublime: aromas of acacia and wild mint jostle with honey, beeswax and vanilla, a mouthful of 

subtle pleasure. This is a didapper palate, a wine whose flavours seem to disappear only to bob up again like a 

nervous dabchick. Grenache 30%, Clairette 30%, Roussanne 20%, Bourboulenc 20%, all the grapes being manually 

harvested and fermented separately in 225 litre oak casks. After twelve months, and after a rigorous selection process, 

the wines are blended. Both colours of Châteauneuf will age happily for ten years or more.  

 

2014 


CHATEAUNEUF-DU-PAPE BLANC 

 



2015 

COTES-DU-RHONE ROUGE “MATHILDE”  

 

2014 



CHATEAUNEUF-DU-PAPE ROUGE CUVEE SPECIALE 

 



2001 

CHATEAUNEUF-DU-PAPE ROUGE CUVEE RESERVE 

 

 



 

 


 

 - 87 - 


 

SOUTHERN RHONE 

Continued… 

 

 

 



 

Glowing with pride 

Growers in the Rhone have been rejoicing since they have been given permission to change the name from Coteaux du Tricastin with its 

connotations of the local nuclear power plant to the more poetic “Ile des Trois Miles”.  

 

 



DOMAINE LA BARROCHE, CHRISTIAN & JULIEN BARROT, Châteauneuf-du-Pape  

In the 17

th

 century Alexandre Barrot purchased the first plot of land and founded a domaine. After him followed Pierre 

Barrot and, after a lot of begatting, Eugène Gabriel Barrot. After him the domaine was divided between four sons, one of 

them was Marcel Barrot. His son Christian Barrot resumed the estate and called it “Lou Destré d’Antan” “the press of 

yesteryear” in memory of his grandfather.  

 

The current domaine comprises 12.5 hectares in AOC Châteauneuf-du-Pape producing only red wines. The average age 

of the vines is 60 years old, but 1/3 of them are 100-year-old-plus nubbly-knobbly Grenache bush vines, notably the 1.6 ha 

vineyard at Grand Pierre, a small pebble-free parcel planted on sloped sandy red soils, the 0.8 hectare at Terres 

Blanches (stony, limestone soils) and a 2.3 hectare plot at Palestor with some more centurion Grenache vines. 

Julien is also very fond of his 0.5 hectare parcel at Pierre à Feu with 60-year-old Cinsault. 

 

The Châteauneuf Signature is the cuvée that most naturally expresses the subtlety of the terroir. It embodies both the 

fullness and the finesse of many complex aromas. It is at once an invitation to travel and a heightening of the senses.  

The result of blending 100-year-old Grenache to Mourvèdre, Cinsault and Syrah varietals it offers a subtle mixture of 

spices and well-ripened red and black fruit flavours, mingled with cocoa-coated dry fruit overtones. Think raspberry, 

incense, mineral and lavender with fine grained tannins, a stony-garrigue cocktail of flavours.  

The winemaker writes: “We have developed this wine with the greatest of care, taking into account the effects of both the 

earth and sky on the grapes and wine. While in the vineyard, we only use organic fertilizers, manually harvest the fruit 

and meticulously select our grapes. Once in the cellar, we gently handle our wines, which are regulated according to a 

gravity-feed system.” Soft extraction methods are used, juices are gently handled and manipulations in the cellar are done 

according to the lunar calendar and weather conditions. Wines are matured in  

foudres and only bottled when they begin to reveal their personality (anywhere between one and three years)  

 

Pure is, as the name suggests, something special, a wine meant to reveal an alliance between tradition and terroir. 

Imagine a corner of land filled with century-old vines and the purest, sandy soil. The resulting wine, 100% Grenache, 

pays due homage to historical Châteauneuf-du-Pape and its most celebrated grape varietal. It embodies delicacy, an 

escape, a synthesis of subtle flavours: strawberries, black cherries, liquorice and a hint of toasty spice. Pure fruit and 

muscular minerality, beautiful texture and length with supple tannin. It signifies the perfect balance between kindness and 

strength.  

 

Stephen Tanzer 93pts: “Intense raspberry, strawberry, and exotic blood orange aromas complicated by garrigue and 

anise. Supple, sweet, and elegant, showing excellent depth and a broad range of red fruit tones. Silky, intensely fruity, and 

long.” 

 

Only a handful of vintages made and the “R” (Rayas) word has already been mentioned. 

 

2014 


CHATEAUNEUF-DU-PAPE “SIGNATURE”  

 



2014 

CHATEAUNEUF-DU-PAPE “PURE” ~ on allocation 

 

 



 

DOMAINE DES VIGNEAUX, HELENE & CHRISTOPHE COMTE, Coteaux de l’Ardèche – Biodynamic 

Domaine des Vigneaux is a third-generation family business located in Valvignères half way between Montélimar and 

Aubenas, Ardèche. This 13-hectare vineyard is planted with Chardonnay, Viognier, Syrah, Grenache, Merlot, Pinot 

Noir and Cabernet Sauvignon and run by Hélène and Christophe Comte. The domain received AB organic certification 

in 2001 but has adopted biodynamic methods as early as 2009. The soil is worked lightly, enriched with organic 

fertilizers and sprayed with plant concoctions, which helps to minimize the use of copper. It also stimulates the vines’ 

self-defence mechanisms and the microbial life of the soils. The ultimate goal is to find the right balance and bring out 

the subtleties of the terroir in each cuvee. Hélène and Christophe have adopted non-interventionist winemaking 

methods using neither additives nor any sulphur. 

A lovely juicy Syrah bursting with healthy smiling purple colour and 

exuding a warm nose of ripe cassis fruit. Ecocert certified. The Viognier is rich with aromas of waxy orchard fruit and 

roasted white spices. The acids are soft, the wine mouthfilling. The Pinot Noir has bold red and dark blue fruit flavours 

and soft spices.  

 

2016 


VIOGNIER 

 



2016 

SYRAH 


 

2015 



PINOT NOIR AU BOUT DES DOIGTS 

 



 

 

 - 88 - 


 

SOUTHERN RHONE 

Continued… 

 

 

 



 

 

From the ripened cluster brandished by its tormented stem, heavy with transparent but deeply troubled agate, or dusted with silver-blue, 



the eye moves upward to contemplate the naked wood, the ligneous serpent wedged between two rocks: on what, in heaven’s name, does 

it feed, this young tree growing here in the South, unaware that such a thing as rain exists, clinging to the rock by a single hank of 

hemplike roots? The dews by night and the sun by day suffice for it – the fire of one heavenly body, the essence sweated by another – 

these miracles…  

 

Colette – Earliest Wine Memories 



 

 

MAS DE LIBIAN, FAMILLE THIBON-MACAGNO, ST MARCEL D’ARDECHE – Biodynamic 

Mas de Libian, a working farm (cereals, fruits and vines) since 1670, has remained in the hands of famille Thibon for its entire 

history. Hélène a remarkably energetic member of the family took over the viticulture and winemaking in 1995, and convinced 

her family to bottle their own wine rather than sell to local négociants. Her farming is entirely biodynamic since the 1960’s 

when her grandfather ran the farm, and the vines (averaging 40-45 years-old) are pruned for low yields and concentration. 

Nestor, a Comtois workhorse, joined the team for her ploughing prowess. The terraced vineyards, composed mostly of galets 

rouges, in St-Marcel d’Ardèche (the west bank of the Rhône) provide stunning views of Mont Ventoux, the Alpilles, and the 

Dentelles de Montmirail. Hélène is in her late 20s and in June this year she was selected by the French Wine Review as one of 

its Young Winemakers of the Year. She makes her wines in a traditional fashion following organic principles, and the 

vineyards have ‘pudding-stone’ soil like that found in Châteauneuf-du-Pape. The stones reflect sunlight during the day and 

retain heat during the cold nights, thus making the vines work harder to extract water and minerals from the soil. 

 

One should drink Vin de Petanque (a 75/25 Grenache/Syrah blend) chilled while playing petanque (or crown boules) – 



preferably. The vines are grown on clay-limestone with lauzes (flat stones) and some rolled pebbles. Grapes undergo strict 

manual selection, are destemmed, lightly crushed and given a five-day maceration. Dark ruby colour, aromas of blackberry, 

myrtle and gentle spices. The palate is warm and digestible with olive notes that recall the Rhône origins. Slap the tapenade on 

the lamb cutlets and get the barbie fired up. Bout d’Zan refers to bits of liquorice; it was also a nickname for Helene’s father in 

his youth alluding to his small stature and tanned skin. Now it refers to the liquorice flavour of the wine. From clay-limestone 

terroir, the gobelet vines yield only 40hl/ha. The wine is vinified without sulphur and 30% of it spends seven months in foudres. 

Black cherry, peppery spice, earthy notes, and did I mention the liquorice? Cave Vinum is a blend of Viognier, Roussanne amd 

80-year-old Clairette on clay-limestone soils with large pebbles. Floral aromas of honeysuckle merge into sweet hay and herbs 

– the wine is like an ethereal vermouth. 

 

2016 


CAVE VINUM BLANC 

 



2016 

VIN DE PETANQUE 

 

2016 



COTES-DU-RHONE ROUGE “BOUT D’ZAN” 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

LE VENDANGEUR MASQUE, ALICE & OLIVIER DE MOOR, Vin de Pays de l’Ardèche – Organic 



A little project from Alice and Oliver de Moor who buy organically grapes farmed from their friends in the Languedoc and 

Ardeche. The grapes are spontaneously fermented in a mixture of foudre and stainless steel and the wine undergoes a natural 

malo before being bottled without filtration or fining and just a little SO2 at bottling. A blend of Viognier, Clairette and 

Grenache Blanc from Domaine des Dimanches (Emile Heredia in the Hérault) and Domaine du Mazel, Valvignère in the 

Ardèche. 

 

2016 


MELTING POTES 

 



 
1   ...   16   17   18   19   20   21   22   23   ...   87




Ma'lumotlar bazasi mualliflik huquqi bilan himoyalangan ©fayllar.org 2020
ma'muriyatiga murojaat qiling