Domaine le roc des anges, roussillon


Introducing the lesser-spotted Bruno Schueller


Download 6.21 Mb.
Pdf ko'rish
bet31/87
Sana21.11.2017
Hajmi6.21 Mb.
1   ...   27   28   29   30   31   32   33   34   ...   87

Introducing the lesser-spotted Bruno Schueller 

The contemplation of things as they are, without substitution or imposture, without error or confusion, is in itself a nobler hings than a 

whole harvest of intervention. 

 

Roll sound, roll camera …Hushed David Attenborough tones: 

I am crouched here in an overgrown vineyard in Alsace hoping to catch a glimpse of one of the rarest bird-vignerons in this part of 

France, the lesser-spotted Bruno Schueller. 



 

The Schueller belongs to a unique sub-species, inhabiting a small 10-hectare zone around Husseren-les-Châteaux, a hamlet hanging on to 

the hillslope below a series of old castle ruins, situated south-west of Colmar. I am actually here in Bildstœcklé, a lieu-dit within the 

commune of Obermorschwihr, the southern neighbour of Eguisheim. During the years when the Grands Crus were delimited, most 

communes received their "own". Grand Cru. But not Obermorschwihr, and this is where the Schueller will happily ply his craft in the 

summer, flitting from vine to vine removing excess vegetation. Although the Schueller might well be classified as part of the biodynamic 

family, he is a free spirit and prefers not to be labelled by any overarching organisation. In the autumn the Schueller will migrate to the 

cool shelter of the winery and establish himself amongst the gigantic old wooden foudres that abound there. There he stores his wine over 

the winter and keeps them to a simple but nourishing diet of zero-sulphur and no other additives. 

 

Once bottled a typical Schueller will begin to show its full aromatic plumage after three to five years. This is when the best Schuellers 



take flight and present majestic soaring flavours. The Schueller may give birth to a variety of little Schuellers, some straw yellow, others 

deep gold, although the most celebrated examples of the Schueller clan are the Pinot Noir family. Wine twitchers might easily confuse the 

Chant Oiseaux and Bildstoecklé with Nuits Saint-Georges, which suggests that it is forgivable not to know your Alsace from your elbow. 

 


 

 - 136 - 



LUXEMBOURG

 

There are more things in heaven and earth…  

 

On a clear day, from the terrace you can’t see Luxembourg at all… this is because a tree is in the way.  

Alan Coren – The Sanity Inspector 

 

 



Pass de Duchy on the left hand side – well that’s what it sounded like to me. 

Left side of the Moselle that is. 

 

Take  away  this  country  –  it  has  no  theme.  It  is  tempting  to  think  of 



Luxembourg  as  a  “beuro-country”  producing  wine  only  by  qualified 

majority voting, perhaps highlighting a convergence between the prevailing 

styles of Alsace and Germany. In my antediluvian edition of Hugh Johnson’s 

Wine  Atlas  it  remains  as  uncharted  as  the  dark  side  of  the  moon,  whilst 

Andrew Jefford dismisses it as “not worth the detour”. Vines, however, have 

been grown on the slopes of Remich since before the Roman conquest, and 

survived serious damage by oidium in 1847, phylloxera in 1864 and mildew 

in  1878.  Today,  a  thousand  grape  growers  produce  around  140,000hl  of 

mainly  white and  rosé wine a year. So there. True, many of the wines are 

distinctly average; the main problems appear to be massive over-production 

and  linking  the  correct  grape  variety  to  the  appropriate  terroir.  Aye,  but 

where there’s muck there are schmucks, (which is where we come in) and 

Eric has sourced some brassy numbers. Prepare to be pleasantly surprised, 

very pleasantly surprised.

 

 



 

 

 



 

DOMAINE MATHIS BASTIAN, REMICH 

Luxembourg has a long tradition of making wine (since late Roman times). Virtually all production is for white and 

sparkling, the major grape varieties being: Rivaner, Pinot Blanc, Auxerrois, Riesling, Pinot Gris and Gewürztraminer. 

The climate is one of the coolest in Europe for winemaking (rivalling England supposedly) and Luxembourg also has a 

clear-as-mad-mud cru classé system, worthy of the Circumlocution Office. Most wines are labelled as varietals. There 

is one covering appellation called Moselle Luxembourgeoise and tasting panels may rank superior wines as Vin 

Classes, Premier Crus and even Grands Premier Crus! This system has attracted criticism and a rival organisation 

called Domaine et Tradition which encourages local variation and expression and restricts yields. 

Domaine Mathis Bastian, a regular visitor to the Guide Hachette comprises 11.7 hectares of vines on chalky soil 

located on the exposed slopes of Remich Primerberg overlooking the Moselle.  

 

Check out your primary fruit options with this quintet of friendly Luxembourgers. The Rivaner (Sylaner/Riesling cross 

to you), is a yummy fresh pineapple popsicle, off dry with compensating singing acidity – the perfect aperitif wine. The 

basic Grand Cru Riesling impresses with its clean lemon-glazed fruit. Its posher big brother is trying to escape the 

house and align itself with the Germanic Moselles on t’other side of the river. Well, they say the Riesling is greener on 

the other side of the river. These wines will upset your long-held preconceptions about Luxembourg wines (as if). Now 

imagine an Alsace Pinot Gris with its ripe honeyed orchard fruit and slide in a little Moselle slatiness. Bastian’s 

“Domaine et Tradition” Pinot Gris has finesse illustrated by the manner in which the wine evolves so eloquently in the 

glass from the initial nose of meadow flowers broadening into something earthier: medlars and truffles, finally re-

enforced by the burgeoning of the secondary mineral aromas. Think of it as a soothing roasted butternut squash 

smoothie. It exudes memories of golden autumn afternoons plumped up on a tussock after a lotos-munching picnic in 

Yeats’s bee-loud glade. The blushing twinkling oeillet Pinot, freighted with amber grapes as Arnold might say, is a rosé 

by any other name, similar to the splendid ramato Pinot Grigio that Specogna makes in Northern Italy. Maybe a tad 

darker. With its lip-smacking cherry-menthol fruit they’ll be sipping this on the sun-bleached promenades of Etzelbruck 

I’ll be bound. 

The Grand Premier Cru appellation, by the way, signifies nothing other than some grand premier cru persiflage.  

 

2016 



RIVANER VIN CLASSE “CLOS DES EGLANTIERS” 

 



2015 

PINOT GRIS, “DOMAINE ET TRADITION” 

 

2015 



RIESLING GRAND 1er CRU “REMICH PRIMERBERG” 

 



2015 

RIESLING “DOMAINE ET TRADITION”  

 

 



 

 

 



 

 


 

 - 137 - 



JURA & SAVOIE 

One cannot simply bring together a nation that produces 265 kinds of cheese – Charles de Gaulle

 

 

The Jura vineyards occupy the slopes that descend from the first plateau of the Jura Mountains to the plain below. The soils are, in the main, 

sedimentary Triassic deposits, or 137irabel deposits of Jurassic marl, particularly in the north of the region. The local grape varieties are 

perfectly adapted to the clay soils and produce wine of a very specific regional character. The Trousseau is one such, being rich in colour 

and tannin. Another local grape variety is Savagnin cultivated on the poorest marly soils. Savagnin is best known as the variety used in the 

vin jaune (yellow wine) of Château-Chalon aged for 6 years on ullage in barrel. Vin Jaune undergoes a process similar to sherry, whereby 

a film of yeast (une voile) covers the surface, thereby preventing oxidation but allowing evaporation and the subsequent concentration of 

the wine. The result is a sherrylike wine with a delicate, nutty richness. Burgundian interlopers also thrive in the Jura (the Haute-Bourgogne 

is, after all, just on the opposite side of the Saone valley) with some very fine examples of Chardonnay and Pinot Noir to be found. 

 

Savoie stretches from the French shore of Lake Geneva to the Isère, comprising the departments of Savoie and Haute-Savoie. Much of the 



terrain is too mountainous to cultivate vines and the Savoie vineyards tend to be widely dispersed. Mondeuse, an indigenous quality variety 

produces full-bodied reds with a peppery flavour and a slight bitterness, particularly in Arbin. Of the whites Altesse (also called Roussette 



de Savoie) is most notable and is similar to Furmint from Hungary. It is exotically perfumed with good crisp acidity and has a certain ageing 

potential. Frangy is the one of the best communes for Roussette de Savoie. The Gringet grape is grown in the village of Ayze. Said to be 

related to the Savagnin. Or the Traminer. Or… I can see you’re looking at me quizzically. 

 

 



DOMAINE JEAN-FRANCOIS GANEVAT, Côtes du Jura – Biodynamic  

“To say that his grapes are spun into gold would not be far from the truth; they are entirely otherworldly.” Kermit Lynch 

 

Superb multiple Chardonnay and savvy Savagnins and limpid reds from a grower who worked with Jean-Marc Morey 

in Burgundy. Jean-François Ganevat vinifies all of his scattered parcels separately respecting the primacy of terroir. 

The Grands Teppes, for example, is from old vines, unfiltered and unsulphured, a wine that will happily age for 

another ten years. Pale gold, it has a scent of honey, quinces and white flowers. The complexity of the nose continues 

on the palate. The pale Trousseau has plenty of acidity with leather and musk overtones and a peppery finish whilst 

the Pinot Noir shows excellent potential for development. The latter achieves its Côtes de Nuits-style concentration by 

virtue of minuscule yields of 21hl/ha and strict green harvest. Thereafter the wine undergoes cool maceration (7C) for 

9 days before a natural fermentation begins with indigenous yeasts. Pigeage and remontage twice daily give further 

extract and colour. Finally, the wine is vinified in 228l barrels lasting 12 months. Dark burgundy colour, nose of 

blueberry, black cherry and beetroot, black fruits, chocolate and leather on the palate, frisky acidity – it’s a wine for 

the decanter.

 

Whereas the Trousseau would happily accompany guinea fowl or smoked meats, the Pinot would appeal 

with venison or smoked duck breast. Grown in Jura since the 13

th

 century Poulsard’s names are legion: Ploussard, 

Peloussard, Pulsard, Polozard, Mescle dans l’Ain. What an enchanting oddity! Such colour – pale colour with 

flickering orange, a mad bouquet with plenty of sous-bois and fruits (cherries and strawberries) in eaux de vie. A silk 

‘n’ spice trail in the mouth: redcurrants, bilberries and rhubarb tied up with liquorice shoelaces. Worth the detour.

 

 

NV 


CREMANT DU JURA BRUT 

Sp 


 

2014 


CHARDONNAY “CUVEE FLORINE GANEVAT” 

 



2014 

CHARDONNAY “GRUSSE EN BILLAT” 

 

2014 



CHARDONNAY “LES GRANDS TEPPES” VIEILLES VIGNES 

 



2014 

CHARDONNAY « LES GRANDES TEPPES » VIEILLES VIGNES - magnum 

 

2014 



CHARDONNAY CHALASSES VIEILLES VIGNES 

 



2008 

CHJARDONNAY « CUVEE DU PEPE » 

 

2014 



CHARDONNAY CUVEE CHAMOIS PARADIS 

 



2014 

CHARDONNAY CUVEE CHAMOIS PARADIS - magnun 

 

2014 



CHARDONNAY “CUVEE MARGUERITE” – magnum 

 



2014 

CHARDONNAY “LES GRYPHEES” 

 

2014 



SAVAGNIN OUILLE CHALASSES MARNES  

 



2014 

ASSEMBLAGE OREGANE 

 

2010 



SAVAGNIN CUVEE PRESTIGE 

 



 

2011 


CUVEE DE GARDE CHARDONNAY-SAVAGNIN 

 



2007 

VIN JAUNE SAVAGNIN VERT – 62cl 

Yellow 

 

2006 



SAVAGNIN OUILLE “VIGNES DE MON PERE” 

 



2015 

J’EN VEUX ENCORE 

 

2015 



J’EN VEUX ENCORE - magnum 

 



2015 

PINOT NOIR “BILLAT ET JULIEN” SANS SOUFRE 

 

2015 



PINOT NOIR “CUVEE JULIEN GANEVAT” SANS SOUFRE – magnum 

 



 

 - 138 - 

2015 

TROUSSEAU “SOUS LA ROCHE” SANS SOUFRE 



 

2015 



TROUSSEAU “SOUS LA ROCHE” SANS SOUFRE - magnum 

 



2015 

POULSARD VIEILLES VIGNES “L’ENFANT TERRIBLE” SANS SOUFRE 

 

2015 



POULSARD VIEILLES VIGNES “L’ENFANT TERRIBLE” SANS SOUFRE - magnum 

 



NV 

VIN DE FRANCE « SUL Q » - ½ bottle 

Sw 

 

 



 

ANNE & JEAN-FRANCOIS GANEVAT (Beaujolais + Jura – generally !) 

 

 



2015  

AILLEURS 

 

2015 



KOPIN CHARDONNAY JURA ET BOURG 

 



2015 

LE ZAUNE A DEDEE 

Or 

 

2015 



Y’ A BON 

 



2015 

DE TOUTE BEAUTE 

 

2015 



DE TOUTE BEAUTE - magnun 

 



2015 

POULPRIX 

 

2015 



MADELON 

 



2015 

MADELON - magnum 

 

2015 



LE JAJA DE BEN 

 



2015 

LE P’TIOT ROUKIN 

 

 



 

So Tell Me About This Multitude of Ganevats... 

 

 

Chardonnay « Cuvée Florine Ganevat » 

Florine Ganevat, from vines planted sixty years ago, is beautifully composed. From the delicate nose of acacia to a mouth 

filled with yellow apricot to a fine, persistent finish seasoned by dry spice, this is an effortless Chardonnay.

 

 

Chardonnay, « Grusse en Billat » 



The minerality comes through on the nose and the palate with orchard fruit and lemon oil. Taut and acidic, but with such 

purity and freshness. A very refined and elegant wine that really leaves a strong impression.

 

 

Chardonnay « Les Grandes Teppes » vieilles vignes 



Les Grandes Teppes (ninety-year-old vines, twenty-four months sur lie, aged in demi-muids) may hide initially under a 

reductive veil. But evolves into a stunning wine comparable to a top Burgundy. Pale gold, it has a scent of honey, quinces 

and white flowers. The complexity of the nose continues on the palate. The wine is thicker and creamier than the Florine 

with phenomenal mouthfeel, length and mineral presence. A veritable vin de garde.

 

 

Chardonnay « Chalasses Marnes » vieilles vignes 



The Chalasses Vignes Vieilles from 113 year old vines has tremendous vitality with a fine precise almost flinty nose and 

slithery acidity. Épatant!

 

Ganevat’s sublime Chardonnay Chalasses Marnes is pared to the essence of flavour, it forms a 



fluid wordless language of its own, it is vinous electricity. When the distance between ourselves and the wine is eradicated 

we don’t have to make the effort to analyse its “hues and fragrances” by lolling the liquid around our mouths, we are 

simply content to drink and be charmed

.

 

 

Chardonnay « Cuvée Marguerite » 

Cuvee Marguerite, however, is made from Melon à Queue Rouge, a red stemmed grape that, according to Stéphane Tissot, 

evolved from Chardonnay in the Jura. “Chardonnay on poor clay soils near Arbois eventually became another grape, the 

red-tailed grape we call Melon-Queue-Rouge. It is not the same as Chardonnay, but it came from Chardonnay. “Other Jura 

producers believe that Melon-Queue-Rouge is a cousin of Chardonnay or even the same grape.  

 

Marguerite is only sold in magnums. Form an orderly queue rouge.

 

 

 



 

 - 139 - 

 

Savagnin Ouille Chalasses Marnes 

Ouille Chalasses Marnes is Savagnin topped up. The wine acquires sherry-style nourishment from the yeasts and reveals all 

the concomitant nutty/dry spicy notes that you might expect. Here be aromas to get all seekers-after-and-snapper-uppers-of-

considerable-trifles to snuffle keenly. Combine bruised apple and yellow plum, add melting butter, fenugreek, walnut, and 

finish with an electric charge of withering acidity. The intensity of the wine is balanced by its freshness.

 

 

Savagnin Cuvee Prestige 



Ganevat’s Savagnin Presige is pure oxidative delight, remarkably fragrant with hints of orchard fruits (cut apple) mixed 

with walnut, dry honey, white pepper and a note of peatiness.48 months sous voile in demi-muid from vineyards on clay 

marl soils. 

 

Vin Jaune Savagnin Vert 

Vin Jaune is one step beyond with so many tangible and intangible qualities: a butteriness verging on the aroma of warm 

cheese (Comté, natch), a cachet of oriental spice, an array of toasted nuts and some eyeball-loosening acidity. This will age 

forever and a day.

 

 

Savagnin Ouille « Vignes de Mon Père » 

Les Vignes de Mon Père is based on Savagnin topped up aged for nine years in barrels and is a massive, explosive, 

imposing wine with the complexity of a vin jaune. The wine is so long, the mouth so intense and spicy. Truly amazing – ce 

vin va vous 139irab sur le cul.

 

 

 

Vin de Table Rouge « J’en Veux » !!! sans souffre 

J’en veux, a melange of various red grapes, has a terrific nose of red fruits and spices and a mouth which is round, fresh 

and spicy with a good bite... Sleuths of recondite grapes, clap the deerstalker on your noggin, scrape out a few tunes on 

your trusty strad, forego the customary seven percent solution, for the game is afoot. Check out this mystery Jurassic gang.  

Ampelographical archivists will lick their lips over indigenous oddities such as Petit Béclan, Gros Béclan, Gueuche (white 

and red), Seyve-Villard, Corbeau, Portugais Bleu, Enfariné, Argant (that’s what he has the most) which lead the roll call of 

the who’s? who. There are 17 of these small but beautiful varieties nestling in Jean-François Ganevat’s property. Some are 

white, like Seyve-Villard, most of the others are red-skinned with white juice. Then, there is Poulsard Blanc, Poulsard 

Musqué… all of which combine to have a party in “J’en veux”, a vin du soif, par excellence. “Un vin de table fait de bric et 

de broc”, with crunchy tannins, a savoury, rustic red, pure quafferama. With its amusing label of a bloke sconing liquid 

from a beer mug this vin glouglou (9.5%) is best served chilled to highlight and enhance the bombinating cherry clafoutis 

and pomegranate juice aromas and flavours – behind which lurk bubbly-yeasty notes (imagine the smell of earth after rain). 

And is there high VA; well, is the bear a catholic?  

 

Pinot Noir « Julien Ganevat » sans souffre 

Cuvée Julien is named after the grandfather of Jean-François, and the schistous vineyard from which the Pinot Noir hails 

was planted partly in 1951, with the remainder of the planting being added in 1977. This is a superb vintage in the Jura and 

the Cuvée Julien is a terrific wine….one of great vitality, structure and harmony. On the nose the wine is rich in earth and 

minerals with spicy, red cherry fruits with some redcurrant and light raspberry high tones. It smells so beautifully pure with 

hints of leather, game, dried flowers, baking spices and stone. Fragrant and very alluring. Taut, light of body and energetic 

on the palate with pure, fragrant red cherry and redcurrant fruits. Set on a backdrop of schist and stone are hints of leather, 

mahogany and soft spice with touches of game, dried flowers and a dab of garrigue. It has a terrific line on the palate and 

shows great sense of place with amazing complexity with a brilliant, mineral-laden acid backbone. 

 

Trousseau « Sous La Roche » sans souffre 

The Trousseau comes from a terroir which is marne with big stones. It is apparently not necessary to do a green harvest on 

this cuvee because the vines are from a selection of old vines that only give small yields (selection massale). The vines face 

due south – a tremendous exposition but are on a 50% incline! It has cherry red colour, aromas of red fruits and 

blackcurrants and is lively and fresh on the palate with pronounced acidity and just a hint of musk and sous-bois. The Pinot, 

from even tinier yields, has brilliant red fruit aromas and flavours. It is pared down, stiletto sharp, with a dimension of 

purity that I love.  

 

 


1   ...   27   28   29   30   31   32   33   34   ...   87




Ma'lumotlar bazasi mualliflik huquqi bilan himoyalangan ©fayllar.org 2020
ma'muriyatiga murojaat qiling