Domaine le roc des anges, roussillon


DOMAINE JEAN FOILLARD, Morgon – Organic


Download 6.21 Mb.
Pdf ko'rish
bet37/87
Sana21.11.2017
Hajmi6.21 Mb.
1   ...   33   34   35   36   37   38   39   40   ...   87

DOMAINE JEAN FOILLARD, Morgon – Organic 

The Foillard’s house is in Villié-Morgon, close to the famed Côte du Py climat. When Jean bought the farm, it was in 

complete disrepair; he began working in viticulture and wine in 1982, first on the family estate, then renting and buying 

vineyards. Today his estate has a total surface of 11 hectares. The fabled Côte du Py is a climat of the Morgon 

Appellation where the vineyards grow on slopes with crumbly schists soil that give Gamay a unique expression. The hill 

is actually an extinct volcano, with lots of different types of soils depending of the plots. Foillard now uses the minimal 

interventionist viticulture, but his wines are neither officially organic nor biodynamic even though he actually applies 

many of the rules. What’s in a name? What is more important for him, he says, is the result in the bottle, and the 

certifications on the labels are not his first concern. His cellar is fairly unsophisticated. He buys one-year-old casks 

and uses them for 10 years, with the objective of keeping the wood in the background. He also has two foudres, one of 

which is over forty years old.  

 

The Morgon is fabulously pure, an unfiltered, unfined, unsulphured turbid Gamay, and has something of the quality of 

what Keats described as “cool-root’d flowers”. The colour is on the dark side of cloudy ruby red, whilst aromas boom 

happily out of the glass, notably kirsch, rhubarb and sweet blackberries; there’s a more fugitive bouquet of warm earth, 

stones and dried spice evolving into dark chocolate and cinnamon. You can stay and play with the generous nose or 

delve into a palate that seems to meet you more than halfway. It is extremely refreshing, bright sweet fruit is 

complemented by a smooth, silky tannic structure, somehow immediate and pleasing yet subtle and complex. Those who 

taste Foillard’s wine are struck by its moreishness: “I’m finding myself reaching for descriptors such as elegant and 

expressive – words you’d associate more with Chambolle-Musigny than Beaujolais. The soft texture is the best thing 

about this wine, and it makes you want to drink. It has no heaviness, it isn’t making an effort, and it has nothing to 

prove. After a while longer, herb and tea elements begin to emerge. Then the bottle is empty, leaving me longing for 

more. It has teased my palate and left me wanting another glass. It is fantastically drinkable”. (Jamie Goode)  

 

He’s bang on the money; there is plenty of meaty life in this Côte du Py. It is lush yet poised, hearty yet fresh, complex yet 

direct. Consider my boxes well and truly ticked. 

 

2016 


MORGON “CLASSIQUE” 

 



2015 

MORGON “COTE DU PY” 

 

2015 



MORGON “COTE DU PY” – magnum 

 



2014 

3.14 


 

2014 



FLEURIE 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 - 165 - 

 

 

BEAUJOLAIS 



Continued… 

 

The Gamay grape is thought to be a mutant of the Pinot Noir, which first appeared in the village of Gamay, south of Beaune, in the 1360s. 



The grape brought relief to the village growers following the decline of the Black Death. In contrast to the Pinot Noir variety, Gamay 

ripened two weeks earlier and was less difficult to cultivate. It also produced a strong, fruitier wine in a much larger abundance. In July 

1395, the Duke of Burgundy, Philippe the Bold, outlawed the cultivation of Gamay as being “a very bad and disloyal plant”-due in part 

to the variety occupying land that could be used for the more “elegant” Pinot Noir. 60 years later, Philippe the Good, issued another edict 

against Gamay in which he stated the reasoning for the ban is that “The Dukes of Burgundy are known as the lords of the best wines in 

Christendom. We will maintain our reputation”. The edicts had the effect of pushing Gamay plantings southward, out of the main region 

of Burgundy and into the granite based soils of Beaujolais where the grape thrived. 

 

 

DOMAINE YVON METRAS, Fleurie – Organic 



The terrain in Fleurie is similar throughout the vineyards and made up of crystalline granites which contribute to the wine’s 

finesse and charm. Yvon Métras possesses parcels of vines in the sector of La Madone (this refers to the chapel of the 

Madonna that surmounts the rounded hillock of Fleurie), an area with such steep gradients that he is compelled to work with 

the aid of a long winch! Everything is done naturally on this parcel, as with the others he owns – no chemicals are used 

whatsoever. Métras’s aim is to raise the level of Fleurie to a higher plane; he uses no sulphur during vinification, nor does he 

chaptalize, but allows the wines to express themselves naturally. The Beaujolais (baby Fleurie) holds the promise of the 

countryside in the spring: it is light, bright, balanced with a silky and supple character and an initial bouquet of irises and 

violets leading to subtle notes of meat and smoky red fruit. On tasting, delicious is the first descriptor that springs to mind for 

the wine is fluid and fresh with lacy tannins, bright acid and pure flavours and a long caressing finish. Dangerously easy to 

drink. The older vine Fleurie has stones for bones, gripping granitic minerality that chisels the straightest of lines across the 

tongue. And the merest suggestion of cherrystones and gooseberries. Don’t expect any change from this wine unless you serve 

it from the carafe. The quixotic Moulin-à-Vent has made our top ten of the year over and again. Oh-so-pale and good beyond 

the pale. We don’t get these rare birds every year so allocations are tiny – if at all! 

 

2015 


BEAUJOLAIS 

 



2015 

MOULIN-A-VENT 

 

2015 



FLEURIE VIEILLES VIGNES 

 



 

 

DOMAINE REMY PASSOT, Chiroubles 

Domaine Remy Passot lies largely in the commune of Chiroubles itself in the heart of the cru Beaujolais region. Chiroubles is 

perched 400m above sea level atop poor granitic soils. The village is set around a 12

th

 century church that is at the centre of a 

territory that climbs to the west up to the slopes of Mont Avenas, which peaks at 700m and overlooks the village and houses a 

tasting chalet. Passot also has vineyards in Fleurie and Morgon. The estate, which has a long history, has established a 

reputation for consistency. Grapes are harvested manually to ensure optimal quality and, once the bunches have been sorted, 

they are put into stainless steel vats and undergo semi-carbonic maceration. Over the next eight to twelve days run-off juice is 

pumped over the cap (once or twice a day). Vatting time varies depending on the cru and the potential of each 165lare. The 

run-off juice is drawn off into some high-potential vats to improve the extraction of flavours, aromas and tannins. The wine is 

then matured is in old oak tuns, before bottling the following spring. The Fleurie shows all the finesse one would expect of this 

appellation. Vibrant purple it is beautifully fruity, with raspberry, cherry, and summer fruit aromas. 

 

2014 


FLEURIE 

 



 

 

MARIE LAPIERRE & JEAN-CLAUDE CHANUDET, Beaujolais – Organic 

Marcel Lapierre was Monsieur Morgon and very much the godfather of Gamay. Marie Lapierre, his wife, makes the wine at 

Château Cambon. These wines are au naturel; the wild yeasts are practically gnawing at your ankles. Intended to express 

terroir and possess a cool freshness, equilibrium and fruit; veritably these are vins des soifs. The Raisins Gaulois is fun 

incarnate – drinking this wine offers indecent pleasure. You have to like a cheekily-monickered wine with a cartoon label of a 

geezer swallowing a bunch of grapes (evidently taking his wine in tablet form). Gummy Gamay, do not pass go, do not collect 

tannin, a redcurrant jam jamboree which just manages to steer clear of sweetness by virtue of a thwack of liquorice on the 

finish. You’re madder than Mad Jack McMad if you don’t serve this well chilled. The Beaujolais, from eighty year old vines is 

wilder; in the murk lurks a jungle of brambly fruit with a whiff of the beast. “La Cuvée du Chat” drinks more like a Morgon. 

It comes from the granitic soils of a tiny 2.5 hectare parcel bought by Jean-Claude Chanudet and Marie Lapierre from a 

friend in 2010. The parcel of vines belonged to Jules Chauvet, once upon a wine. Chanudet and Lapierre took over and began 

the conversion to organic agriculture. The beautiful Gamay grapes from these 80-year-old vines are handpicked in October, 

after which carbonic maceration with natural yeasts occurs in an enamel tank with some pumping over to stimulate activity. 

The wine is then moved to foudres to rest on lees before finally being bottled with minimal SO2. 

 

2016 


VDT GAMAY RAISINS GAULOIS  

 



2016 

VDT GAMAY RAISINS GAULOIS - 5 litre BIB 

 

2016 



CHATEAU CAMBON BEAUJOLAIS 

 



2016 

JULES CHAUVET CUVEE DE CHAT 

 


 

 - 166 - 

 

 

 



 

BEAUJOLAIS 

Continued… 

 

A MATTER OF PRONUNCIATION  

 

Is that Rully as in Scully? 



(As in Mulder) 

(As in Bosch) 

No, that’s tosh 

It should be Rully as in truly 

Is it really? 

No that’s Reuilly from the Loire 

The Lower? 

No mid-Loire 

Bette Middler? 

And it’s pronounced Roy 

But you haven’t mentioned Brouilly 

Brewery? 

No Brouilly as in Artero Ui 

I tell you what. 

What? 

It’s hard to know Rully. 



Noted. Duly. 

 

 



DOMAINE CRET DE GARNACHES, SYLVIE GENIN DUFAITRE, Brouilly 

Classic Brouilly where the ebullient, youthful Gamay fronts a rich, serious wine. Green practices and low yields 

(33hl/ha) lend this wine its more mineral backbone whilst the Gamay provides the classic strawberry and raspberry 

fruit aromas. The palate, marked by suppleness, fleshiness and finesse, has a peppery bite on the finish, which lifts it 

above the run-of-the-mill Gamay. A must with hearty Lyonnais food: poached sausages paired with creamy warm 

potatoes or coquelet flavoured with tarragon. 

 

2016 



BROUILLY 

 



2016 

BROUILLY – ½ bottle 

 

 



 

DOMAINE JEAN-CLAUDE LAPALU, Brouilly – Biodynamic 

I’ve always thought of Brouilly as one quaff away from straight Beau Jolly, in other words red wine red lolly. With Jean-

Claude Lapalu’s wine you can detect the fists behind the fruit. This is one of the new crew of sternly-made rock steady cru 

Beaujolais. Grapes are hand-picked and sorted, loaded by conveyor to avoid damage, and given neither SO2 nor cultured 

yeasts during the fermentation. During the 8-10 day maceration a wooden grill is used to enhance extraction. The wine stays 

at least a half year on its fine lees gaining power and complexity. And yet the Brouillys are neither heavy nor clumsy and one 

could easily imagine them ageing ten to fifteen years. The old vines were old when Jean-Claude’s grandfather began farming 

them in 1940. Is this where the schist of Côte de Brouilly touches the signature granite of Brouilly? It seems almost to inhabit 

a hypothetical halfway house between Beaujolais and Priorat!

 

The old vines Brouilly is the combination of two cuvées, one 



made by carbonic maceration, the other a traditional vinification with destemmed grapes, (Jean-Claude only uses indigenous 

yeasts and doesn’t use any sulphur during vinification, (there is only some added at the bottling and then only in very small 

quantities: 2gr/hl). The cuvaison lasts for10 to 20 days. The two cuvées are then assembled after their malolactic fermentation 

and spend the winter in stainless steel tanks. The dark red fruits on the nose and palate can’t disguise a probing minerality; if 

ever granite was translated into liquid this is the case.

 

Croix des Rameaux, from beautifully exposed prime parcels of eighty- -



year-old vines and aged in three-to-five-year-old barriques after a long cuvaison, disports a wonderfully wild nose of leather, 

tar and red cherry and palate-punching dark fruits: stylistically it seems to straddle Burgundy and the Rhône. 

  

2016 


BEAUJOLAIS-VILLAGES VIEILLES VIGNES 

 



2016 

BROUILLY VIEILLES VIGNES 

 

2016 



BROUILLY CROIX DES RAMEAUX 

 



2013 

VIN DE FRANCE “EAU FORTE” 

 

2013 



VIN DE FRANCE “EAU FORTE” – magnum 

 



2012 

BROUILLY “ALMA MATER” – amphora 

 

 



 

 

 - 167 - 

 

DOMAINE DE LA GRANDE COUR, JEAN-LOUIS DUTRAIVE, Fleurie – Organic 

The estate of Domaine de la Grand Cour dates back to 1969 when it was purchased by Jean Dutraive, making it one of the 

oldest in the village of Fleurie. Jean Dutraive was joined by his son and fifth generation vigneron Jean-Louis in 1977. By 

1989, the reins were fully in Jean-Louis’ capable hands. The heart of the property are the lieux-dits of Clos de la Grand Cour, 

Chapelle des Bois and Champagne which make up a total of 9 hectares of vines in Fleurie, surrounding the house and cellars. 

Additionally, the family has 1.6 hectares in the cru of Brouilly. The average age of the vines are around 40-50 years, with a 

good chunk around 70 years old. 

Jean-Louis is a devout practitioner of organic viticulture and the property has been certified by ECOCERT since 2009, 

though was practicing organic for many years before that. Harvest at Dutraive is done by hand and grapes are immediately 

placed in tank at low temperatures to begin carbonic maceration (without sulphur). The wines ferment naturally with 

indigenous yeast and are macerated on the skins for anywhere from 15-30 days depending on the vintage and the particular 

wine. The wines are then gravity fed to the cellar for a period of ageing of 6-15 months, depending on the cuvée. Elevage 

occurs mostly in used burgundy barrels, though the Fleurie Grand Cour, Fleurie Chapelle des Bois and Brouilly are 

sometimes aged at least partially in old foudres or cement tanks depending on the vintage. Minimal S02 is added during the 

élévage, only when necessary, though a small amount is added when the wines are racked and assembled for bottling. And in 

general, no fining and filtration is used unless absolutely required. 

The wines of Jean-Louis Dutraive are some of the most aromatically and texturally unique in all of Beaujolais. One whiff, and 

the wines display an almost exotic floral and spicy aroma overlayed over lush minerally Gamay fruit, sort of like a top Morey 

St. Denis 1er or Grand Cru nose combined with earthy, Volnay-like fruit. There is also a textural lushness and exuberance 

backed up by ample structure and acid. These are substantial Beaujolais, and ones that could certainly stand up to food. They 

also have the requisite material to develop and evolve over the medium term, i.e. 10-12 years of aging, 

The Clos is indeed from a walled vineyard – south east facing on pink granite, vinified sans soufre and aged in 1-5 year-old 

French barrels. 

 

2014 


FLEURIE CLOS DE LA GRAND COUR SANS SOUFRE 

 



 

 

ANNE & JEAN-FRANCOIS GANEVAT, Beaujolais/Jura – Organic/Biodynamic 

This is a collaboration between sister and brother Anne & Jean-François Ganevat and is a reaction to the tiny yields that the 

2012 and 2013 vintages gave in Jura. They decided to diversify by purchasing parcels in Beaujolais (Brouilly, Fleurie, 

Morgon and elsewhere) as well as buying grapes grown by vigneron-friends with a similar mentality and approach to wine. 

Thus it is that they make a Bo-Jura/Jurolais style, impishly teasing wine with vivid, bright, crunchy fruit. 

We’ve managed to secure a decent parcel of these thoroughbred regional hybrids. 2013 Madelan is 80% Gamay (40 year old 

vines) blended with 20% Enfarine, the latter grown on pieds de francs. Hand-harvested fruit, pigeage with feet, carbonic 

maceration of 19 days in ancient tronconic vats with indigenous yeasts, zero sulphur added, a wine that is so comfortable in 

itself. Purple in colour, Madelan’s nose evokes blackberries, violets and pepper, the palate is soft, sweet and tender with 

lovely texture and acidulous brightness and the finish is tonic and spicy.A Toute Beauté is a fascinating wine featuring 70% 

Gamay mingling with diverse ancient Jurassic oddities (Petit Béclan, Gros Béclan, Geusche, Argant, Peurion, Portugais bleu, 

Isabelle, Enfariné…) The Gamay vines are 50 years old and fourteen years for Jurassic varieties grown on franc de pieds. 

Vinification is simple – foot-stomping grapes, 25 days of carbonic maceration in tronconic vats and totally natural 

winemaking i.e. sans kit and caboodle. This wine has a touch more material and minerality than the Madelan with a subtle 

tannic dimension that will allow ageing, although it is engaging enough in its infancy and a swirl in a carafe helps it unwind

.

 



 

2015 


Y A BON THE CANON 

 



2015 

DE TOUTE BEAUTE 

 

2015 



DE TOUTE BEAUTE – magnum 

 



2015 

MADELON 


 

2015 



MADELON – magnum 

 



 

 

DOMAINE DE BOTHELAND, LAURENCE & REMI DUFAITRE, Brouilly – Organic 

Rémi is a member of the informal group that has evolved from Kermit Lynch’s “gang of four,” the producers in Morgon who 

studied with natural-wine-pioneer Jules Chauvet (winemaker and biologist) and make natural wine (Foillard among them). 

This group has grown to include younger winemakers like Rémi, who are working in the same spirit. Rémi makes wines in a 

classic carbonic style, using whole bunches, which are carefully sorted to avoid broken grapes or rot. He adds some carbon 

dioxide gas to protect the grapes at the beginning of fermentation, and does not use any temperature control. He avoids foot 

stomping the grapes. His goal is to have as little juice in the tank as possible. Remi makes all his wines with the same method, 

thus we can really see and taste the differences between the sites, with minor differences in the elevage of each cuvee. He 

tastes each cuvee before bottling, and may decide to add between zero and 2 mg of sulphur, depending on how stabile he 

judges the wine to be. The Beaujolais Blanc is unusual, really dense yet saline, and the reds have glorious tension. 

 

2015 


BEAUJOLAIS-VILLAGES BLANC 

 



2015 

BEAUJOLAIS-VILLAGES “PREMICES” 

 

2014 



BROUILLY 

 



 

GAMAY VIN DE FRANCE – keykeg – 20 litres 

 

 



 

 - 168 - 



BURGUNDY

 

He took a swig of the friand, tasted fruit and freshness, a flavour that turned briefly and looked back over its shoulder at the 

summer before last, but didn’t pause even to shade its eyes. Elizabeth Knox – The Vintner’s Luck 

SOUTHERN BURGUNDY 

 

It  is  very  difficult  to  generalise  about  Burgundy.  As  with  any  region  it  is 



often a matter of “follow the grower”. And then what’s good for whites isn’t 

necessarily great for reds (and vice versa).  

 

The consistent quality in the Mâconnais and Chalonnais continues to delight. 



These regions are beginning to give the better-known appellations a run for 

their money. Or our money, I should say. Taste the Givrys from Domaine 

Parize for richness, acidity, complexity and fruitiness. In Rully, the soils and 

expositions favour Chardonnay and Jean-Baptiste Ponsot’s whites have that 

fine  citric  freshness  that  one  associates  with  this  appellation.  Mercurey  is 

where  the  most  intense  examples  of  Pinot  Noir  are  to be  found. Domaine 



Emile  Juillot  makes  earthy  wines,  and  the  estate  is  moving  towards  fully 

organic practices. 

 

The  wines  from  the  Mâconnais  are  arguably  even  better.  Christophe 



Thibert’s wine thrill with their delicacy and purity. The wines from Philippe 

&  Gerard  Valette,  including  an  old-vines  Mâcon-Chaintré  and  a  stunning 

Pouilly-Fuissé  reveal  meticulous  work  in  the  vineyard  with  relatively  late 

harvesting and careful vinification using natural yeasts and minimal sulphur 

yields wines of remarkable concentration. Julien Guillot (Clos des Vignes 

du Maynes) also produces exceptional whites – Mâcon-Cruzille – and reds 

(mainly  from Gamay) with penetrating acidity and exceptional minerality. 

His terroir is extraordinary – a geological scrapyard of minerals that seem to 

migrate into the core of the wines themselves. 

 

In Burgundy we talk about the grower rather than the vintage. 2009 is being 



trumpeted across Burgundy as a great white vintage. Undoubtedly, we are 

seeing more consistent wines, but in our humble opinion wines from 2008 

exhibit more tension and finer acidity, with the 2010s somewhere in between 

the two stylistically. 

  

 



Download 6.21 Mb.

Do'stlaringiz bilan baham:
1   ...   33   34   35   36   37   38   39   40   ...   87




Ma'lumotlar bazasi mualliflik huquqi bilan himoyalangan ©fayllar.org 2020
ma'muriyatiga murojaat qiling