Duration and Anri Sala’s Time After Time


Download 82.93 Kb.
Pdf ko'rish
Sana20.04.2017
Hajmi82.93 Kb.

Simone Schmidt

PhD Candidate, School of Film and TV, Monash University.



Duration and Anri Sala’s Time After Time

This paper draws from extensive interviews conducted with the Albanian video artist 

Anri Sala. It locates his work as duration in relation to the philosophy of Bergson and 

that of Deleuze following from this. This paper refers specifically to Sala’s work Time 



After Time and communicates this work as duration in terms of its engagement of a 

lived time and how this time resists generalisation and presences singularity.



Filmic Forms of Time: Montage, Metaphor and the Durational Image

This paper locates contemporary video artist Anri Sala’s work as duration in terms of 

both its form and content. In order to clarify this location let us think about how 

duration functions in conventional film. In conventional film, time works as a conduit 

for action and works ultimately to form a story or carry a message. Here time is 

subservient to that which moves through it and to what this movement signifies. In 

conventional film, in a duration of two hours we may understand, through temporal 

ellipsis and montage the elapse of 10 years. Thus the duration of 2 hours refers to a 

temporal period of 10 years. When Sala terms his work durational work he is 

separating it from what is referred to as the moving image.



 1

  He is situating his work 

as duration as separate from referential time. Before delving further into the nature of 

duration as concerns the work of Sala, let us first pause to consider referential time as 

occurs in conventional cinema.

Film theorist Andre Bazin in his text What Is Cinema ? proposes that the montage of 

conventional cinema produces a metaphorisation of the image. He considers the 

reality of each image that is brought together into the filmic composition, results in 

referring outside itself according to the consciousness of the director. In this way, 

montage imposes an interpretation of the image upon the spectator and the time 

within the image is employed to achieve this aim.

2

The process of metaphorisation 



occurs whereby the image that frames one time and space is part of a signifying chain 

that causes it to refer beyond itself to an organised system of reference. Metaphor, 

belonging to language, is a transfer – a carrying from one place to another, from the 

Greek meta – over, across and pheirein – to carry or bear – where one thing is 

employed to signify something else.

3

 We can also consider this process of 



metaphorisation a kind of metamorphosis of time where the form of real time

4

 is 



shaped into story or signification. Metaphor allows us to make sense of reality, 

however in real time where one moment passes into the next there is no place for 

1

 Anri Sala Interview One, with Simone Schmidt, Berlin, 14.09.06. (Hereafter referred to as 



Interview One.) I will from here refer to his work as the durational image.

2

 



Andre Bazin, What Is Cinema? Volume One, University of California Press: Berkley, 1967, 

26.


3

 

Robert K, Barnhart, Dictionary of Etymology (Edinburgh: Chamber, 1988), 656.



4

 Real time may be considered formless in the sense that it is a continuum – a never-ending 

flow. However, I argue that in Sala’s durational images where time is captured by the framed 

image and also in experience that we later return to as memory, there are particular forms of 

time that are produced by the qualitative affects of certain rhythms.

1


metaphor without sacrificing this time to a mental abstraction. In distinction to 

montage’s metaphorisation of the image into a coherent message, Bazin introduces the 

depth of field shot of Italian neo-realism as undetermined by the director and 

affording a disorganised and ambiguous experience.  He considers this shot as a 

united time-space that is released from the signatory interchange of montage and 

allows time to flow without its necessary extension to action or meaning. He locates 

this image as being close to the experience of reality in that it engages ‘a more active 

mental attitude on the part of the spectator’ who must negotiate its lack of symbolic 

cohesion.

5

 



Sala’s location of his work as duration relates not only to his working with the 

material of time but also to how this material communicates when it is not 

manipulated according to the end of signification. Thus we return to considering his 

work as duration in terms of both form and content. Duration as both form and 

content is significant to Sala’s practice in terms of his search for new aesthetic forms 

and a resistance to common cultural references.

6

 In this way, duration as that which 



resists metaphor is key to his work. Sala comments on this resistance:

There is this idea with metaphor that everything has to become part of our world and our 

logic, and that we have to explain it and make it fit … I always felt in the schools in the 

West this idea of the metaphor that everything has to explain something else. A butterfly 

cannot just be a butterfly for itself it already means something else … Not everything 

follows our own logic. If we really believe that we become blind.

7

To return to Bazin’s discussion, the image that resists metaphorisation works with a 



temporal realism, in a time that is not chopped up and sutured into the logical form of 

story.


8

 Temporal realism is not something unfamiliar to video art. Video art and the 

notion of the record of real time have been partnered since its conception. We see it in 

the video art of the early performance artists and also in contemporary video art that 

communicates as a surveillance or a documentary of public space.

9

 The temporality 



communicated in Sala’s work relates to these records of time, and to Bazin’s united 

time-space shot, where it is often composed through a single take with a static camera, 

which records a continuum of the experience of time from one position in space. 

However, there is something else occurring in Sala’s work, something which is tied 

with positioning his work as durational images, something of a more vital nature. In 

this paper I argue that this something both constitutes and communicates a lived time. 



Duration as Lived Time

Time After Time is a 5 minute record of a horse standing on the edge of a road at night 

time. The horse appears fragile and precariously balanced as if it would not take much 

for it to fall into the path of the violence of speeding vehicles. Its form and that of the 

buildings behind it waver in and out of figuration and abstraction. This movement is 

produced by a rhythm of synchrony between the illuminating headlights of the 

passing vehicles and the focus ring of the camera. The lack of light and ambiguous 

5

 Bazin, What is Cinema?, 35-36.



6

 Interview One.

7

 Anri Sala, Interview Three, with Simone Schmidt, Berlin, 18.09.06. (Hereafter referred to as 



Interview Three.)

8

 Bazin, What is Cinema?, 37.



9

 For examples of this type of performance art see Bruce Nauman’s and Valie Export’s work 

of the 70s. For examples of the contemporary records of public space see for example, 

Francis Alys’ Zocalo (1999) and Jeroen de Rilke and Willem de Rooij’s Untitled (2001).

2


perceptual cues in this piece situate it as an enigma. Released from narrative and a 

coherent context, this piece as duration communicates as a temporal unfolding of 

confused sensorial engagement – as a lived time of disturbed and unstable perception. 

Sala’s work has been described as engaging a ‘sentient animalism, the original speed 

of the living.’

10

 What might this speed be? Of Time After Time Sala has stated that he 



did not so much consciously operate the camera, as find a rhythm between that of his 

breath and the focus ring of the camera.

11

 The movement of our breath is perhaps the 



most basic and most intimate of rhythms we experience. Time After Time is also 

composed of the rhythms of the external world, the passing cars, the movement of 

light and sound, the horse’s movement, yet also of our internal rhythms. In fact we 

access these external rhythms offered to us through the durational image, by way of 

our internal rhythms – in this way what is external to us in lived time is also internal 

to us. In locating Time After Time as duration – as lived time, I am locating it as the 

experience of time as it is felt or embodied as distinct from time that is signified. Of 

this distinction Sala comments:

Five minutes is five minutes. It cannot be less than five it cannot be more than five but … it can feel 

longer than five or it can feel shorter than five … This is related to … pleasure, this is related to … 

[boredom], this is related to whether there is pain … to whether you as a viewer feel comfortable 

with what you are seeing, this is related to your position [as viewer] … 

12

Sala has distinguished time as it is quantified from time as qualitative experience. 



Quantifiable time is a type of referential time – whereby time is understood according 

to a numerical symbol. Cinematic images communicate referential time. For example, 

the image of a plane passing signifies the journey of a character from one country to 

another. We are not given an experience of this time, that is the space inhabited by the 

character on the plane, but rather a symbolic image of it. There are many other types 

of this filmic referential time – the flying pages of a calendar, the falling leaves from a 

tree, to more subtle mechanisms – that all communicate the passing of time, without 

us having to live this time. Sala has stated that he is not interested in,

[m]aking people understand time through references but making them feel time as an 

experience, which means as a duration … [where there is the possibility] of mix[ing] to the 

point of  forgetting or not knowing anymore the time of the film with the time of seeing 

10

 Suzanne Page, “Preface”, in Anri Sala: When Night Calls it a Day (Paris:Musee d’art 



moderne de la Ville de Paris, 2004), 8.

11

 Anri Sala in Stefano Boeri “Anri Sala: Long Sorrow and Other Stories,” in Flash Art 39, no. 



247 (March April 2006), 89.

12

 Sala, Interview One.



3

the film. The film becomes your time.

13

The distinction between time as a reference or as quantifiable and time as internal 



experience is fundamental to Bergson’s conception of duration introduced in his first 

text Time and Free Will. Here, Bergson describes duration as a multiplicity – as 

qualitative experience where the continuum of moments produce layers of the past 

interpenetrating the present. He argues that these moments cannot be broken up, 

measured across space in the way the words I now write follow each other across the 

page or like the beads strung along a chord that make a necklace. That is, duration is 

not an assemblage of distinct instants that can be geometrically or mathematically 

located. Bergsonian duration is the experience of successional moments as 

multiplicities, through their interpenetration, and the whole – the overall composition 

of the moments of experience. If this composition were to be broken into parts it 

could not be felt and therefore cease to be duration for duration is this feeling. 

Bergson writes:

When the regular oscillations of the pendulum make us sleepy, is it the last sound heard, 

the last moment perceived, which produces the effect? No, undoubtedly not, for why then 

should not the first have done the same? Is it the recollection of the preceding sound or 

movements, set in juxtaposition to the last one? But this same recollection, if it is later set 

in juxtaposition to a single sound or movement, will remain without effect. Hence we must 

admit that the sounds combined with one another and acted not by their quantity as 

quantity, but by the quality, which their quantity exhibited, that is by the rhythmic 

organisation of the whole. Could the effect of a slight but continuous stimulation be 

understood in any other way?

14

Bergson continues his discussion of the unquantifiable nature of duration, stating that 



experience that is intensive cannot be made extensive through language.

 15


 He outlines 

a relationship between what is intensive – durational experience and what is extensive 

– language, symbols and our visual apprehension of space.

16

 The tension between the 



intensive and extensive is locatable in Time After Time. This work offers us intimate 

experience  – the rhythm of the artist’s breath in relation to the observed horse in the 

darkness. The external world however, is disfigured through the interplay of the 

camera with the darkness and the shifting lights. What is extensive is not clearly 

communicable – the work offers no easily read signs. In my experience of the image, 

the obscure view of the horse and its condition returns me to the intensive space of the 

breath that although an intimate space in its closeness to what is closest in us, marks a 

distance from the reality of the horse. The horse moves in and out of focus in 

continual abstraction and realisation with the rhythm of breath and the vacillations of 

the light and sound of the passing vehicles. Within the durational image object and 

concept, that which are extensive, are substituted for sensation and its corollary, 

affect, that which is intensive. As an image of experience – undetermined and 

intensive, Time After Time offers us a problem of interpretation.

Of the work Sala states:

13

 Sala, Interview One.



14

 Henri Bergson, Time And Free Will: An Essay on the Immediate Data of Consciousness

trans. F.L Pogson (1913; repr., Mineola: New York: Dover Publications, 2001), 105 – 106, 

emphasis added.

15

 Ibid. 130.



16

 Henri Bergson ‘The Idea of Duration’ in Bergson: Key Writings, eds. Keith Ansell Pearson 

and John Mullarkey (New York: Continuum, 2002), 61, 63, 65.

4


Generally, I explain my videos. But not this one. Because I find that people have 

different readings according to their cultural contexts. For the Canadians, the 

Australians, the Americans, whose society succeeds in controlling their environment, it 

is a circus horse that has been trained to play this scene and raise its leg each time a car 

passes. In the Balkans or in Senegal, where man is in bankruptcy compared with the 

environment, where he fails to control what surrounds him, this presence is otherwise 

perceived. To many it seems surreal.

17

Sala has highlighted that which cultural context we come from will determine how we 



read the horse and its situation. Yet speaking of the work to friends and colleagues I 

found that people also found resemblances to fairy stories or a childhood horse and 

other aspects of their histories that are not so obviously translatable to a socio-

political domain. However, what is common to all perspectives of the work is that the 

viewer will invest what is significant to them in the image of disorganised reality and 

that their investment will be strikingly evident for there is nothing written in the 

image that can either confirm or deny this investment. 

Duration, Attentive Recognition and The Time Image

This premise of our ordering of that which is disorded in reality through our personal 

investment is a significant thesis in Bergson’s second text Matter and Memory

Bergson communicates that what we perceive of reality is driven by our economies of 

interest and that we are not perceiving reality in its entirety but reducing it to what is 

significant to these economies.

18

 Time After Time as a disorganised image of reality 



highlights our economies of perception. A viewer of Time After Time may recall the 

image of a fairytale, however they are not able to marry this image to durational 

image – that is, render it as the reality of the image – it remains a recollection 

contiguous to the durational image, which resists metaphorisation. Bergson 

formulates the processes of perception as grounded in his theory of duration, whereby 

perception as duration is the memory of the past awoken in the present. He writes:

With the immediate and present data of our senses, we mingle a thousand details of our 

past experience. In most cases these memories supplant our actual perceptions, of which 

we then retain only a few hints, thus using them merely as ‘signs’ that recall to us former 

images. The convenience and the rapidity of perception are bought at this price; but hence 

also springs every kind of illusion …

19

Bergson introduces two process of perception that are developed by Deleuze in his 



text Cinema Two: The Time Image.

20

 The first is a habitual perception whereby we 



perceive that which is of immediate use to us and from this we proceed to act in a 

certain way. The object of perception is recognised as general and familiar through 

17

 Sala in Stephanie Baumann, “Occurrence,” Synethesie, 28 06 2004, 



http://www.synesthesie.com/index.php?table=texts&id=1411

, accessed 20.07.06

18

 Bergson Matter and Memory in Key Writings, 99, 101.



19

 Bergson, Key Writings, 96, emphasis added.

20

 The discussion that follows is greatly influenced by Gilles Deleuze’s reading of Bergson’s 



theory of the two processes of perception. See, Gilles Deleuze, Cinema Two: The Time 

Image, trans. Hugh Tomlinson and Robert Galeta (1989; repr., New York: Continuum, 2005), 

42, 43. In this discussion I have employed the terms used by Deleuze – habitual and attentive 



recognition. However, Bergson separates the two forms of memory as motor-mechanisms 

and independent recollections. See, Henri Bergson, Matter and Memory, trans. Nancy 

Margaret Paul and W. Scott Palmer (1912; repr., New York: Dover, 2004), 87.

5


images of the memory that are similar to it. This recognition is realised through what 

Bergson term’s the sensori-motor of the body, which acts upon the object according to 

its utility.

21

Habitual recognition allows us to drink without thinking from a water 



bottle – to perceive the object without contemplation and immediately act upon it. The 

second type of perception takes the form of an attentive recognition where in the 

experience of our realities our sensori-motor, that is – our perception that extends into 

action – is either relaxed or disturbed. This is where we can no longer make 

immediate use of our environment, our habit-motor

22

 has given way and we 



contemplate the water bottle, no longer seeing it as that which contains water, but 

rather as a form that evokes another kind of perceptual engagement in terms of its 



singularity. In attentive recognition there is no longer an immediate recognition, 

rather, there is a more curious mode of viewing that requires us to draw deeper from 

our perceptual revenues in order to make sense of the object. Deleuze frames attentive 

recognition as follows:

My movements – which are more subtle and of another kind – return to the object, so 

as to emphasize certain contours and take ‘a few characteristic features’ from it. And 

we begin all over again when we want to identify different features and contours, but 

each time we have to start from scratch … we see the object remaining the same, but 

passing through different planes … we constitute a pure optical (and sound) image of 

the thing, we make a description … The optical (and sound) image in attentive 

recognition does not extend into movement but enters into a relation with a 

‘recollection image’ that it calls up.

23

Time After Time engages this subtle movement of attentive recognition where the 

object cannot be concretely realised, but rather wavers in relation to a play of 

recollections. The surreality that some viewers experience of this image can be related 

to the effect of attentive recognition which Bergson locates as close to a dreamlike 

state.

24

 He states that where the habitual recognition takes us away from the object in 



order to act, attentive recognition brings us back to ‘dwell upon’ it.

25

  Attentive 



recognition may occur when our familiar economies of reference have been disabled 

due to the emotional experience of rupture, the experience of which, as Sala has 

commented, although painful, allows one’s perception to reawaken, from its slumber 

of habit, and to see things with a greater curiousity, to participate in the slower 

process of inquiry rather than an immediacy of judgement.

26

Sala has stated that he was interested in the figure of the horse because it is a figure so 



familiar to humanity, a symbol so inscribed within our histories and our mythologies. 

He desired to locate the familiar figure of the horse in terms of an unfamiliarity.

27

 In 


opening the ‘recognisable’ sign of the horse to a lived time – the time of duration – 

recognition is disturbed and we ask ourselves what it is in fact that we see.

21

 The body is a sensori-motor system where it feels affections (sensori) and performs actions 



(motor) – this is the reflexive/active domain of perception. See Bergson, Key Writings, 114.

22

 The term habit-motor is a development of sensori-motor and signifies the body’s perception 



extending into habitual action. See Key Writings, 137 for the use of this term in relation to 

habitual recognition.

23

 Deleuze, Cinema Two, 44-46. 



24

 Bergson, Key Writings, 94.

25

 Ibid., 118.



26

 Sala, Interview Three.

27

 Anri Sala in Interview with Hans Urlich Olbrist, Point of View: An Anthology of the Moving 



Image. Anri Sala (New York: Bick Productions, New Museum of Contemporary Art, 2004).

6


 

Time After Time is an image open to time. It is what Deleuze terms a time image

Deleuze distinguishes this image from his concept of the movement-image. He 

develops this taxonomy of images, after Bergson, from the concepts of habitual and 

attentive recognition. The movement image is of conventional cinema where time 

carries action that discloses the meaning of situations.

28

 The time-image is where 



‘time ceases to be derived from movement’ and ‘appears in itself’.

29

 Situations within 



the time-image are opened to time and signs become what Deleuze terms op and son 

signs, presenced as singularities – no longer part of a generalised order – that is part 

of a knowledge system where things are recognised according to our interests. 

Deleuze writes:

we perceive only what we are interested in perceiving, or rather what it is in our interests 

to perceive, by virtue of our economic interests, our ideological beliefs and psychological 

demands. We therefore only perceive clichés. But if our sensory-motor schemata jam or 

break, then a different type of image can appear: a pure optical-sound image without 

metaphor brings out the thing in itself … its radical or unjustifiable character, because it no 

longer has to be justified.

30

Time After Time is an optical-sound image without metaphor. Its signs are not 

disclosed through action or utility but undetermined and allow the poles of the 

imaginary and the real to touch. 

31

 Our subjective overlays hover before these 



ambiguous signs, highlighting whatever it may be that we can invest – highlighting 

perception as a creative act. However, this investment is only fleeting – it cannot mark 

the radical nature of the optical-sound image.

Op and son signs tell us little of what we are to do with them but more about what we 

can feel of them. They are significant in that they are presences, in that they demand 

attention. Sala has stated that he wishes to give presence to things normally forgotten 

in the hierarchy of things.

32

 Giving presence to things however does not mean locating 



them according to a particular knowledge system. The horse on the side of the road 

could be a setting for human action or a human reference point and yet it is neither of 

these things. It works to touch on the presence of the horse, its surroundings, the 

vehicles – the situation as a whole rather than communicate as a representation, a 

metaphor or cliché.

 

Time After Time resists the general and metaphorical and presences the singular. The 

durational image affords a process of curious inquiry and allows the horse and its 

world to exist beyond any framework we might impose upon it. Sala’s project is not 

as simple and clear a trajectory as offering us the singularity of material presences 

rather than, offering an opening to how these presences are in tension or constant 

interplay with our subjective apprehension of them. The op son sign of attentive 

28

 This distinction echoes Sala’s distinction of his work as duration from the moving image and 



also the separation of Bazin’s temporal realism of the united-time space from the ‘tricks of 

montage’.

29

 

Deleuze, Cinema Two, xi – xii.



 

30

 Ibid.,19 – 20.



31

 Deleuze, Cinema Two, 9, 44.

32

 Interview Three.



7

recognition compels us to add our spirit to matter.

33

 Yet they are also that which 



disturb this process of recognition and are engaged through a continual creation and 

erasure.

34

 This process is figured in the rhythm of abstraction and realisation of form 



in Time After Time. It also occurs in our efforts to sense and make sense of it. This 

process of continual creative change is essential to duration – whereby experience is 

undetermined and simultaneously calls for but resists our organisation of it. In this 

way, Time After Time communicates and constitutes lived time – duration.

35

 

 



33

 Deleuze, Cinema Two, 46.

34

 Ibid. 44.



35

 

It is this form of communication that I argue offers an ethics of perception in relation to 



alterity. However, I cannot continue on this trajectory due to the limit of space.

8


Download 82.93 Kb.

Do'stlaringiz bilan baham:




Ma'lumotlar bazasi mualliflik huquqi bilan himoyalangan ©fayllar.org 2020
ma'muriyatiga murojaat qiling