Editorial board slava stetsko


Download 16.82 Mb.
Pdf ko'rish
bet19/44
Sana15.12.2019
Hajmi16.82 Mb.
1   ...   15   16   17   18   19   20   21   22   ...   44

74
THE  UKRAINIAN  REVIEW
certainty  that  its  preparation  had  made  it  com pletely  safe.  Y o u   could  find 
dozens o f situations  in which the same thing could happen as did at  Chornobyl. 
This  is  especially  true  o f  the  first units  o f  the  Leningrad,  Kursk,  and  Chornobyl 
NPS.  Th ey  have  no  emergency  cooling  systems.  One  has  first  o f  all  to  shut 
them  down.  (. . . )  It  is  impossible  to  build  any  more  RBMKs,  I’m  convinced  o f 
that.  As  for  improving  them,  it  is  not  worth  the  expense.  The  philosophy  o f 
extending the  life o f nuclear  pow er stations  is  far  from justified.
GORBACHEV.  But  could  these  reactors  be  brought  up  to  international  require­
ments?
ALEKSANDROVC..)  All  countries  with  developed  nuclear  pow er  engineering 
use  reactors o f a different type from what  w e  use.
And  as  early  as  28  December  1984  (!),  a  decision  o f the  Inter-departmen­
tal  Scientific  Council  for  Nuclear  Energy  confirmed  the  proposals  o f  an 
expert  commission  for  upgrading  the  RBMK-1000  in  accordance  with  the 
normative  documents  on safety.
(...)  MAYORETS  [Member  o f the  Government  Commission].  As  far  as  the  RBMK 
is  concerned,  that question  can  be  answered  unequivocally.  N o  one  [else]  in  the 
world set  out to  produce  a  reactor o f this type.  I  am  convinced,  that  even  when 
all  the  work  has  been  done  on  the  RBMK,  it will  still  not satisfy  all  present-day 
requirements.
RYZHKOV.  W e  were  heading  for  an  accident.  If  w e  hadn’t  had  an  accident 
now,  then,  with  things as  they are,  it  could  have  happened  at  any time...  .  As  it 
is  now  known,  there  is  not  a  single  nuclear  pow er  station  without  incidents, 
(...)  It has also  become  known  about the  faults  in the  design  o f  the  RBMK  reac­
tor,  but  neither  the  Ministries  nor  the  Academy  o f  Sciences  o f  the  USSR  drew 
the  appropriate conclusions.
(...) The executive group considers that stations where a large  amount o f pre­
liminary  work  has  been  done will  have  to  be  completed,  but that the  construc­
tion  o f [new] stations with  these reactors  must  be stopped.
These  were  the  appraisals  o f  the  specialists  who  took  part  in  the  top- 
secret  session  o f  the  Politburo  o f  the  CC  CPSU  on  the  safety  o f  the  RBMK 
reactor.  Dozens  o f  commissions  and  scientists  presented  proofs  o f  its  dan­
gerous  nature.  And what then?
A   year  after  Chornobyl  construction  was  started  on  two  more  generator 
units  using  RBMK  reactors,  the  third  unit  at  the  Smolensk  NPS  and  the  sec­
ond at Ignalina...
Judging  from  the  shorthand  record  o f   the  Politburo  session,  Mikhail 
Gorbachev,  a  jurist  by  training  and  [at  that  time]  General  Secretary  o f  the 
Central  Committee,  turned out to be  the most assiduous expert on  all  our reac­
tors,  including  the  “goodies”  —   the  WER-type.  I  am  quite  certain  that  w e 
should never have  known this if it had not been for August  1991.  Not even the 
members  o f Gromyko’s  Politburo.  Solomentsev spoke at this  meeting in  a state 
o f  agitation,  saying  that  this  was  the  first  they  had  heard  o f  such  revelations 
about our reactor construction.

DOCUMENTS &  REPORTS
75
(...)  GORBACHEV.  H ow   many  times  did  you  people  in  the  State  Nuclear 
Pow er  Inspectorate  turn  your  attention  to  the  problem  o f  this  reactor?  [the 
RBMK.  A.  Ya]
KULOV.  During  the  three  years  that  I  have  w orked  in  this  job  —   according  to 
the  style  o f the  times  —  I  never  heard such  a  question.  W e  concentrated  rather 
on  the  WER-1000.  Its  units  were  less  controllable.  Not  a  year went  by  without 
some accident  in a W E R .
GORBACHEV.  What  is  your  opinion  about  Sidorenko’s  statement  that nowhere 
in  the  world  has  there  been  any attempt to  use  reactors  o f the  RBMK  type,  that 
our W E R   and RBMK  do  not  meet  international  standards,  and that under  inter­
national  inspection,  the W E R  comes out better than the  RBMK.
KULOV.  The  W E R   has  definite  advantages  but  its  operation  involves  a  certain 
danger.
GORBACHEV.  Does  this  mean,  in  your  opinion,  that  the  VVERs  should  be 
closed down  too.  W hy don’t  you  announce  that w e  mustn’t build VVERs  either?
KULOV.  The  W E R   is  better  than  the  RBMK,  but  the  WER-1000  is  worse  than 
those  based on  the  original  units.
DOLGIKH.  Is the  W E R  up to  present-day standards?
KULOV.  Yes,  but the  VVERs  being  built now are worse than the old  ones” .
Can you  understand that,  reader? If the  W E Rs  now being built are  “worse 
than  the  old  ones”,  then why build them? Who decided this  and  why?
MAYORETS.  The  WER-1000  is  new,  it corresponds  to  the  latest safety  require­
ments,  but it  is unreliable  in  operation  because the  instruments  go out o f order.
“What  Kind of  R eactor  Do You  Prefer?”
This  question  from  the  secret  protocol  shook  me  almost  more  than  any­
thing  else.  It was  put by  Politburo  Member  Nikolay  Slyunkov  to  the  Deputy 
Minister  o f  Power  Engineering  and  Electrification  o f  the  USSR,  Gennadiy 
Shashakin.  To  which  Shashakin  replied:  “The  W E R ”.  Thank  God  Slyunkov 
did  not  tell  the  deputy  minister  what  kind  o f  reactors  the  Politburo  o f  the 
Communist  Party  o f  Byelorussia  preferred.  [Note:  Slyunkov  was  First 
Secretary o f the Communist Party o f Byelorussia.  Ed.]
And  today,  seven  years  after  the  Chornobyl  catastrophe,  almost  nothing 
has  changed  in  the  nuclear  energy  policy  o f  the  independent  republics  of 
the  former  USSR.  Once  again  the  Ignalina  NPS,  with  the  RBMK  reactors 
which  were  shut  down  out  o f hatred  for  the  “centre”  at  the  demand  o f the 
Baltic  “patriots”,  is  back  in  operation.  President  Ter-Petrosyants  o f Armenia 
is  also  speaking  about  restarting  the  Armenian  NPS  in  the  near  future, 
although  it  is  situated  on  a  seismic  fault.  [It  was  shut  down  under  pressure 
from   the  Arm enian  “g re e n ”  m ovem ent,  fo llo w in g   the  earthquake  o f 
December  1988.  Ed.] The  shortage  o f electrical  power has  made  [him]  forget 
about  this.  In  spite  o f  the  fact  that  the  Ukrainian  Parliament  voted  to  shut

76
THE  UKRAINIAN  REVIEW
down  the  Chornobyl  NPS  in  1993,  at  the  end  o f  last  year  the  second  and 
first  blocks  w ere  once  again  started  up.  And  quite  recently,  Stanislau 
Suskievic,  the  Speaker  o f the  Parliament  o f Belarus,  made  a  pronouncement 
about  the  need  to  build  two  nuclear  p ow er  stations  in  Belarus.  [Since 
Belarus,  although  independent  since  25  August  1991,  has  no  President,  Dr. 
Suskievic,  as  Speaker,  is  de fa cto  head o f state.  Ed.]
But  nuclear  power  is  now  making  a  very  vigorous  comeback  in  Russia. 
On  26  March  1992,  Y egor  Gaidar,  at  that  time  head  o f  the  government, 
signed  an  order  on  resuming  construction  o f nuclear  pow er  stations  in  that 
country.  Without any  analysis  o f the  state  o f the  nuclear  reactors  being  pub­
lished.  And  this,  moreover,  in spite  o f the  fact that in  1991,  on the eve  of the 
visit o f President Yeltsin  to the  USA,  the Academy o f Sciences  recommended 
the  closure  o f  the  majority  o f  Russian  nuclear  pow er  stations,  in  view   o f 
world  safety  requirements.  The  “black  list”  included  the  Leningrad,  Bilibino, 
Kursk,  Beloyarsk  and  Smolensk  power stations,  and  two  blocks  o f the  Kola 
and  two  o f the  Novovoronezh  stations.  It was  recommended  that these  dan­
gerous  reactors  should be  phased  out  over the  next  two years,  According  to 
the  Russian  Academy  o f Sciences,  only  two  stations  out  o f nine  could  meet 
the safety requirements  completely.
Gaidar’s  order  was  the  first  step  towards  the  grow th  o f   p ow er  o f  the 
nuclear  lobby  by  an  infusion  o f   fresh  b lo od   into  the  sector,  which  in 
essence  b lew   up  seven  years  ago  together  with  the  Chornobyl  reactor. 
Today  the  Phoenix  has  been  reborn,  shaking  the  radioactive  ash  from  its 
wings.
On  28  Decem ber  o f   last  year,  a  decision  o f   the  Russian  governm ent 
was  published  on  “Questions  o f   the  construction  o f   nuclear  stations  on 
the  territory  o f the  Russian  Federation".  This  envisaged  the  comm ission­
ing  o f  33  new   blocks  o f nuclear  p o w er stations.  It  is  proposed  to  site  19 
o f   these  in  the  Central,  North-Western  and  Black-Earth  zones  o f  Russia. 
These  are  densely  populated  regions  with  oil  and  gas  pipelines  to  the 
countries  o f  the  CIS  and  the  Baltic  States.  And  am ong  the  nuclear  reac­
tors  to  be  commissioned  are  our old  acquaintances,  the  RBMKs.
In  the  “Concept  o f   the  developm ent  o f nuclear  p o w e r  engineering  in 
the  Russian  Federation” ,  approved  by  the  Collegium   o f  the  Ministry  o f 
Nuclear  P o w e r  on  14  July  1992,  a  g o o d   deal  o f space  is  devoted  to  the 
safety  o f   nuclear  p o w e r  stations,  which  have  to  b e  brought  “up  to  a 
level  which  rules  out  the  possibility  o f   a  serious  accident  with  the  dis­
charge  o f   fission  products  into  the  environment”.  This  referred  both  to 
existing  nuclear  p o w er  stations  and  to  a  new   generation  o f  them.  But  is 
it  possible  in  principle  to  attain  the  maximally  possible  safety-level  with 
this  type  o f  reactor?
Many  p eop le  w ill  certainly  remember  the  tragic  death  o f  Academician 
Valeriy  Legasov,  w h o  took  part  in  the  Chornobyl  clean-up  operation  and 
w h o   later  committed  suicide  on  the  day  follow in g  the  second  anniver­

DOCUMENTS &  REPORTS
77
sary  o f  the  accident.  At  the  top  secret  session  o f  the  Politburo,  Legasov 
told  Gorbachev:
“the  RBMK  reactor  in  certain  respects  does  not  meet  international  and  Soviet 
requirements.  There  is  no  protection  system,  no  dosimetry  system,  no  outer 
cowl.  We,  o f  course,  are  to  blame  that w e  did  not  keep a  proper watch  on  this 
reactor.  This  is  my  fault  too.  ...The  same  is  true  also  o f the  first  W E R   blocks. 
Fourteen o f  them too do not meet present-day Soviet  safety standards  either”.
T w o   years  later,  shortly  before  Legasov  died,  while  he  was  recording 
something for the  documentary film  “The  Star W orm w ood”,  he went further.
“Every  approach  to  ensuring  nuclear safety...  consists  o f three  elements.  The 
first element  is  to  make  the  object itself,  in this  case  the  nuclear  reactor,  as safe 
as  is  maximally  possible.  The  second  element  is  to  make  the  operation  o f this 
object  as  reliable  as  is  maximally  possible,  but  the  w ord  “maximally”  must  not 
be  understood  in  the  sense  o f 100  per cent reliability.  The  philosophy o f safety 
necessarily  demands  that  a  third  element  be  introduced,  which  assumes  that 
nevertheless  an  accident  will  take  place  and  that  radioactive  materials  or  some 
chemical  materials  will  escape  from  the  apparatus.  So,  to  meet  this  case,  it  is 
essential  to  package  the  dangerous  object  in  what  is  called  a  containment  ves­
sel...  But  in  Soviet  pow er  engineering,  this  third  element  was,  in  m y  opinion, 
criminally  ignored.  If w e  had  had  a  philosophy  associated  with  the  idea  that 
there  must  necessarily  be  a  containment  vessel  built  around  every  one  o f our 
nuclear  reactors,  then  the  RBMK,  with  its  geometry,  w ould never have seen  the 
light  o f day.  The  fact  that  this  device  did  see  the  light  o f  day  was  illegal  from 
the  point o f view  o f  international  safety standards,  and safety standards  general­
ly,  but  in  spite  o f all  this,  within  the  device  itself there  w ere  three  major  design 
miscalculations.
...  But  the  ch ief  cause  was  a  breach  o f  the  basic  safety  principle  o f   such 
devices  —   siting  such  devices  inside  capsules  which  limit  the  possibility  o f 
[radiojactivity escaping beyond the limits o f the station  itself, the device  itself’.
And  this  is  the  time  and  place to  recall  that,  as  Legasov,  Izrael and  other 
scientists  asserted,  the  Chornobyl  accident  was  not  the  biggest  in  the 
world.  The  biggest  nuclear  pow er  station  accident  in  the  w orld  had  hap­
pened  long  before  Chornobyl,  in  1979,  at  Three  Mile  Island  in  the  USA. 
But  this  reactor  was  inside  a  cowl.  The  accident  took  place  inside  the 
c o w l  w hich  ruptured,  but  on ly  a  very  small  quantity  o f  radioactivity 
escaped  into  the  environment.  And since  then  the  USA  has  not  built a  sin­
gle  nuclear p o w er station.  Not even with a  reliable  cowl.
In  the  n ew   “Concept  o f the  developm ent  o f  nuclear  p o w e r  engineer­
ing”  it  is  noted  that  on  1  July  1992,  in  Russia  “there  are  in  operation  28 
industrial  p o w e r blocks  at  9  nuclear  p o w er stations...  o f  w hich  12  pow er 
blocks  are  o f  the  light-water  W E R   type,  15  are  uranium-graphite  chan­
nel  reactors  (11  RBMK  blocks  and  4  EGP  blocks)  and  one  block  with  a 
fast  neutron  reactor”.  And  this  is  what  Legasov  had  to  say  about  them, 
fiv e  years  ago,  b efore  his  mysterious  death:  “It  is  necessary  to  think  seri­
ously  about som e  special  measures  to  localise  accidents  in  these  28  reac­

78
THE  UKRAINIAN  REVIEW
tors,  since  it  is  e co n o m ica lly   a n d   technically  im p o s sib le   to  b u ild  
c o w ls o v e r them ”.  (M y  emphasis.  A.  Ya).
This  means  that  w hatever  the  scientists  do,  w hatever  safety  measures 
they  em ploy  (and  a  great  deal  was  actually  done  to  make  the  RBMKs 
safe  after  the  Chornobyl  accident),  the  principal  danger  o f   the  p ow er 
blocks  n ow   in  operation  in  Russia  cannot b e  eliminated.  A nd  this  consti­
tutes  the  tragedy  o f   nuclear  engineering  in  our  country  which  has  ch o­
sen  for  its  developm en t  a  path  that  is  depraved  from   the  beginning. 
About  this  problem   “it  is  necessary  to  take  thought  today,  necessary  first 
and  forem ost  for  Soviet  society  to  take  thought,  since  it  is  our  prob lem ”, 
Legasov  said  before  his  death.  At  the  top  secret  session  o f  the  Politburo 
in  summer  1986,  he  likewise  asserted  that  “the  w eak  spot  o f   the  RBMK 
has been  know n  for  15 years".
But  there  are  other  opinions  about  this  issue.  At  the  same session  o f the 
Politburo,  Academician  Aleksandrov  let  fall  that  “a  cowl  w ould  only  have 
made  the  accident  worse!”  Other scientists  consider  that  “N obody  knows!”. 
This  means  that,  on  the  one  hand,  a  cowl  over  the  RBMK  is  a  technical 
impossibility,  but  even  if one  could  have  been  built,  it  w ould  simply  have 
made  the  accident worse.  However,  unremittingly,  Five  Year Plan  after Five 
Year  Plan,  these  dangerous  p ow er  blocks  w ere  planted  in  our  national 
econom y by physicists close to the powers-that-be.
This  is  the  secon d  year  o f   life  without  a  Politburo  and  w ithout  a 
Central  Committee  o f the  CPSU. There  exist  the  conclusions  o f  dozens  o f 
competent  commissions  and  groups  o f  scientists  on  the  reasons  for  the 
explosion  at  the  Chornobyl  Nuclear  P ow er  Station,  which  put  the  blam e 
on  the  reactor  itself.  These  include  the  authoritative  diagnosis  carried  out 
back  in  1990,  by  a  Commission  o f  the  State  Nuclear  Energy  Inspectorate 
o f   the  USSR,  headed  by  the  w ell-know n  scientist  N ikolay  Shteynberg: 
“Defects  in  the  design  o f   the  RBM K-1000  reactor  in  operation  in  the 
fourth  block  o f  the  Chornobyl  NPS  predeterm ined  the  serious  con se­
quences  o f   the  accident.  But  no  changes  have  been  ob served  in  the 
approach  to  the  issue,  although  here  one  is  dealing,  in  effect,  with  Life 
itself.  But  w here  are  such  changes  to  com e  from,  when  the  p e o p le   w h o 
brought  us  to  Chornobyl  have  barely m oved  their chairs?”.
Their  names  and  their  faces  are  well-known.  (And  not  only  in  Russia.) 
First  o f   all  they  lied  to  us  about  the  causes  and  consequences  o f   the 
Chornobyl  accident,  they  took  decisions  about  building  houses  for  the 
evacuees  in  areas  that w ere  themselves  dangerous,  and  then,  know ing the 
real  causes  o f the accident,  they loaded all  the  guilt onto  the pow er station 
staff.  And  n ow   they  are  running  us  just  as  before.  Making  use  o f the  fact 
that  the  society  at  large  is  poorly  informed,  they have  drawn  up  their  irre­
sponsible  plans  to  “nucléarisé”  poor  Russia  with  realities  w hose  faults  are 
irrevocably built  into the  design.
Academician  Aleksey  Yablokov,  an  adviser  to  the  President  o f  Russia, 
commented  that  the  new   concept  o f developing  nuclear  energy was  “unac­

DOCUMENTS &  REPORTS
79
ceptable  from  the  juridical,  economic,  ecological  and  political  points  o f 
v ie w ” .
On  the  ev e  o f  each  anniversary  o f   Chornobyl,  the  Politburo  used  to 
draw   up  a  “Plan  to  forestall  counter-propaganda  actions".  (Especially 
zealous,  on  the  first  anniversary,  w ere  the  services  o f  Mr.  Falin,  w h o  in 
1987  was  head  o f   the  N ovosti  press  agency,  w h o  feared  the  “possible 
attempts  b y   the  subversive  centres  o f   imperialism  to  make  use  o f   the 
anniversary  o f the  accident  at  the  Chornobyl  NPS  to  launch  a  wide-scale 
anti-Soviet  campaign.)  (A p p en d ix  to  Protocol  o f  the  Secretariat  o f  the  CC 
CPSU,  N o.  42,  26.2.1987).  T h e  correction  o f  the  “plan”  was  carried  out 
personally  b y  Y egor  Kuzmich  Ligachev.  On  10  April  1987  a  vote  was 
taken  in  the  Secretariat  o f  the  CC  CPSU  on  the  planned  lie,  and  as  usual, 
the  voting  was  unanimous  (T o p   Secret  Protocol  No.  46).  “Voting  as  fo l­
low s:  Comrades:  G orbachev  —   “For”,  A liye v  —   “For”,  Vorotnikov  —  
“ F o r” ,  G ro m y k o   —   “F o r” ,  Z a ik o v   —   on  lea ve ,  L ig a c h e v   —   “F o r ” , 
R y z h k o v   —   “ F o r ” ,  S o lo m e n t s e v   —   “ F o r ” ,  C h e b r ik o v   —   “ F o r ” , 
Shevardnadze —  “For”,  Shcherbytskyi —   “For”.
It  was  always  100  %  “For” .  In  spite  o f  the  fact  that  at  their  top  secret 
sessions  they  called  the  consequences  o f  the  Chornobyl  explosion  “the 
consequences  o f  a  small  w ar”  (Andrey  Grom yko),  and  com parable  with 
the  “use  o f   a  w e a p o n   o f   mass  destruction  (M ik h ail  G orb a ch ev,  S. 
Sokolov).  But  this  was  only  for  the  initiated.  They  assured  the  com m on 
masses  that  “There was  no  threat  to  human health” .
D oes  not  this  new   “Concept  o f  the  development  o f nuclear  pow er”  o f 
the  Ministry  o f   Atom ic  Energy  o f  the  Russian  Federation  resem ble  the 
“plan  to  forestall  counter-propaganda  actions”?  And  if this  is  so,  then  life 
on Earth with  a  reactor will  be possible only with  a  “co w l”  over  every per­
son.  I f that  can be called  life! 


80
THE  UKRAINIAN  REVIEW
B o o ks  &  P e rio d ica ls
Anders Aslund,  SYSTEMIC CHANGE AND STABILIZATION  IN 
RUSSIA,  Royal  Institute  of International Affairs,  24pp, £6.50
This  monograph,  the  latest  in  the  series  o f papers  produced  by  the  Royal 
Institute  o f International  Affairs  “Post-Soviet  Business  Forum”  addresses  the 
problem  o f  why  the  economic  reforms  attempted  in  Russia  in  1992  have 
failed  to  stabilise  that  country’s  economy.  As  such  it will  be  o f considerable 
interest  to  all  those  concerned  with  the  future  o f Ukraine,  whose  economy, 
for  the  foreseeable  future,  will  inevitably  remain  closely  tied  to  the  other 
post-Soviet states,  Russia  in particular.
During  1992,  production  in  Russia  fell  drastically,  unemployment  began 
to  em erge  as  a  serious  social  phenom enon,  and  poverty,  in  general, 
increased,  although  certain  individuals  became  conspicuously  wealthy.  A 
number  o f  commentators  on  this  situation  have  argued  that  the  problem 
goes  back  to  the  timing  o f  the  Gorbachev  reforms  o f  1986-90,  suggesting 
that it would have been wiser to  force  through  economic  reform  from  above 
(on   the  Chinese  model)  before  attempting  to  democratise  the  system.  This 
view,  Dr.  Aslund  argues,  is  incorrect  factually  (Gorbachev  began  pressing 
for  the  introduction  o f  family  farms  as  early  as  February  1986)  and,  more­
over,  fails  to  grasp  the  fact  that  (as  he  gives  ample  reasons)  the  Soviet  sys­
tem  was,  in  fact,  unreformable.  The  true  cause  o f the  failure  o f the  Russian 
reforms  o f  1992,  Dr.  Aslund  argues,  was  Russia’s  “democratic  deficit”:  the 
new  State  powers  have  not  been  consolidated,  the  old  nom enklatura  still 
retains  much  o f its  former  power  and  the  Central  Bank  (the  prime  villain  of 
the  piece  in  Dr.  Âslund’s  view )  continued  to  issue  virtually unlimited  credits 
for the  benefit o f the  former élite.  The  failure  to  liberalise  energy  prices —   a 
major  mistake  from  the  point  o f  view   o f  economics  —   likewise  served  to 
line  the  pockets  o f the  old  nom enklatura.
Unlike  many  western  commentators,  who  urge  that  the  unity  o f  the  old 
Soviet  “economic space”  should be  maintained  for the  sake  o f "stability”,  Dr. 
Aslund  contends  that  another  prime  mistake  was  Russia’s  reluctance  (for 
political  reasons)  to  make  a  clean  break  with  the  past.  M oscow ’s  attempts  to 
maintain  a  “rouble  zone”  has  simply  meant  that  attempts  to  tackle  the  cur­
rency  reform  which  Russia  so  urgently  needs  have  been,  in  Dr.  Âslund’s 
words  “piecemeal  and  hesitant”.  Shock  therapy,  o f  the  type  suffered  by 
Poland  under  the  Balcerowicz  plan,  is  frequently  dismissed  as  too  danger­
ous  and  destabilising  for  Russia.  In  Dr.  Aslund’s  view,  although  shock  thera-
1   ...   15   16   17   18   19   20   21   22   ...   44




Ma'lumotlar bazasi mualliflik huquqi bilan himoyalangan ©fayllar.org 2020
ma'muriyatiga murojaat qiling