Editorial board slava stetsko


Download 16.82 Mb.
Pdf ko'rish
bet22/44
Sana15.12.2019
Hajmi16.82 Mb.
1   ...   18   19   20   21   22   23   24   25   ...   44

95
Ukrainian  Autocephalous  Orthodox  Church,  organised  the  “exodus”  o f  his 
clerics  and  their  fam ilies  to  the  West.  Making  his  tem porary  base  in 
O ffe n b a c h ,  in  W est  G erm any,  he  h e lp e d   org a n ise  the  U krain ian 
Autocephalous  Orthodox  Church  in  France,  and  established  a  new  diocese 
for  the  United  Kingdom.  By  this  time,  his  Church  had  been  suppressed  in 
Ukraine,  and  its  believers  forcibly  incorporated  into  the  Russian  Orthodox 
Church,  whose existence  Stalin  was  (just)  prepared  to  tolerate,  provided  that 
it  was  prepared  to  render  unto  Stalin  that  which  (in  Stalin’s  opinion)  was 
Stalin’s.  But  the  Ukrainian  Autocephalous  Orthodox  Church  (w hose  very 
name  seemed  to  predicate  the  existence  o f an  independent  Ukrainian  state 
—  or at least a  Ukrainian  independence  movement) was  outlawed.
In  1947,  Bishop Mstyslav moved to Canada,  where  he  served  for  three years 
as  Ukrainian  O rthodox  Bishop  o f  W innipeg  and  head  o f  the  Ukrainian 
Orthodox  Church  in  Canada.  In  1950  he  moved  to  the  USA,  establishing  his 
headquarters  at  South  Bound  Brook,  N ew   Jersey,  where  he  founded  the 
Ukrainian Orthodox Centre  o f St Andrew the Apostle.  Following a  Synod which 
brought  about  the  unification  o f  several  branches  o f  the  Ukrainian  Orthodox 
Church,  he  became  President  o f the  Consistory  o f this  Church.  In  1969,  when 
Metropolitan  Nikanor  died,  he  succeeded  him  as  Metropolitan  o f the  UAOC  in 
exile —   an  area  covering  Western  Europe  and the  British  Isles,  Australasia  and 
Latin America.  Tw o years later,  when Metropolitan  loan  died,  Mstyslav succeed­
ed  him as  head  o f the  UAOC  in  the USA also,  so  that he  was  now  head  o f the 
entire Ukrainian Autocephalous Orthodox Church in diaspora.
During  this  time,  Archbishop  Mstyslav  played  a  significant  role  in  ecu­
menical  contacts  with  other  churches,  including,  first  and  foremost,  the 
Ukrainian  Greek-rite  Catholic  Church.  He  took  part  in  the  w ork  o f  the 
Second Vatican Council,  and  in  1968,  in  a  meeting considered  to  be  o f great 
significance  for  both  churches,  welcomed  to  South  Bound  Brook  Cardinal 
Josyf Slipyj,  the  head  o f the  Ukrainian  Greek-rite Catholic Church.
Meanwhile,  in the homeland,  Soviet power was crumbling,  and the  two  pro­
scribed  Ukrainian  Churches,  Catholic  and  Orthodox,  emerged  from  the  cata­
combs.  In June  1990,  the  Ukrainian  Autocephalous  Orthodox  Church  held  its 
first  Synod  in  Kyiv,  proclaimed  the  restoration  o f the  Kyiv  Patriarchate  (which 
had  vanished  in  the  year  1300,  when  the  Patriarch  o f  the  day  quit  Kyiv,  still 
devastated from the Tatar onslaught 60 years  previously,  and  betook himself to 
Moscow).  The  vote  for  the  Patriarch  was  unanimous  —   for  Mstyslav.  For  the 
last  three  years  o f his  life,  the  new  Patriarch,  now  over  90  years  old,  became 
an international  commuter between  New  Jersey and  Kyiv,  and  in August  1991, 
visited Lviv for the solemn  homecoming and  reinterment o f the  mortal  remains 
o f the late Cardinal Slipyj,  who had died in Rome  in  1984.
Meanwhile,  as  Ukrainian  aspirations  for  independence  becam e  more 
manifest,  in  1989,  the  Ukrainian  exarchate  o f the  Russian  Orthodox  Church 
had  been  renamed  the  Ukrainian  Orthodox  Church,  though  remaining  still 
subject  to  Moscow.  But,  once  Ukraine  had  achieved  full  independence,  the 
head  o f  this  Church,  Metropolitan  Filaret,  wanted  likewise  to  renounce  his

96
THE UKRAINIAN  REVIEW
Church’s  allegiance  to  Moscow.  All  he  achieved,  though,  was  a  head-on 
clash  with  the  Moscow  Holy  Synod,  which  deposed  him  as  Metropolitan 
and  deprived  him  o f  his  priestly  status,  appointing  a  Russian,  Vladimir  of 
Rostov,  to  the  see  o f  Kyiv.  Filaret,  however,  refused  to  accept  this  verdict, 
and  declared  him self  to  be  still  the  leader  o f  the  Orthodox  Church  in 
Ukraine.  Some  members  o f the  UAOC  felt  that  this  would  be  an  appropriate 
time  to  effect  the  union  o f all  Ukrainian  Orthodox,  and  hurriedly  convened 
a  Synod  to  effect  a  merger  o f  the  two  churches.  Under  the  proposed  deal, 
Mstyslav  would  remain  Patriarch  o f  the  united  Church,  with  Filaret  as  his 
deputy with right o f succession.
Mstyslav,  however,  refused  to back  the  deal.  On  the  one  hand,  he  made  it 
clear  that  Filaret  and  his  Church  were  tainted  by  long  years  of complacency 
towards  the  Communist  regime,  while  on  the  other  he  said  that  the  Moscow 
Holy Synod (which  many believers would have said was  equally,  if not  more 
compromised)  had acted  canonically in deposing  Filaret.  The  only tme  repre­
sen tative  o f   O rth o d o x y   in  U kraine,  he  stated,  was  the  Ukrainian 
Autocephalous  Orthodox  Church,  which  had  never  compromised.  He  spent 
what were  to prove  the  last months  o f his  life  preparing  for  a  general  council 
o f that Church  to  determine its way forward  in  today’s  changed conditions.  ■

T
he
U
krainian
R
eview
A  quarterly journal devoted  to  the study of Ukraine
Autumn, 1993
Vol. XL, No. 3

EDITORIAL BOARD
SLAVA STETSKO 
S en ior Editor
STEPHEN OLESKIW 
Executive Editor
VERA  RICH 
R esearch Editor
NICHOLAS  L.  FR.-CHIROVSKY,  LEV  SHANKOVSKY, 
OLEH  S.  ROMANYSHYN 
E ditorial Consultants
Price: £5.00 or $10.00 a single copy
 
Annual Subscription: £20.00 or $40.00
Published by
The Association  of Ukrainians  in  Great  Britain,  Ltd. 
Organization  for the  Defense  of Four Freedoms 
for Ukraine,  Inc.  (USA)
Ucrainica  Research  Institute  (Canada)
ISSN 0041-6029
Editorial inquiries:
The  Executive  Editor,  “The  Ukrainian  Review" 
200  Liverpool  Road,  London,  N1  ILF
Subscriptions:
“The  Ukrainian  Review”  (Administration),
49  Linden  Gardens,  London,  W2  4HG
P rin ted  in   G reat B ritain   by th e U krainian P ublishers L im ited
 
2 0 0  Liverpool R oad,  London,  N1  ILF
 
Tel.:  071  6 0 7 6 2 6 6 /7
  •  F ax:  071  6 0 7 6 7 3 7

The Ukrainian Review
Vol.  XL,  No.  3 
A Quarterly Journal 
Autumn  1993
C O N T E N T S
EDITORIAL 
2
6 0 th  A nniversary of th e  1932-33  Fam ine
WILL  RUSSIA  REPEN’I?.  Ivan  Drach 
3 
1933 —  A  VIEW  EROM  LONDON  8
C urrent Affairs
UKRAINE AND  THE  PROBLEMS  OF  NUCLEAR  WEAPONS 
Lt.-Coloncl  Analoliy  Illushchenko 
13
IRAN  AND  UKRAINE:  THE VIEW  PROM  TEHRAN 
Dr.  Ali  Granmaych 
20
THE  STATE  OE TI IE  UKRAINIAN  IIEALTII  SERVICE 
Prof.  B.I I.  Iskiv 
23
HIGHER  EDUCATION  IN  UKRAINE —   INTERNATIONAL 
COLLABORATION  IN  DEVELOPMENT  David  Randall 
28
CHERNIVTSI— A  FAILURE  IN  GLASNOST  Steve  Hide 
33 
H istory
UKRAINIAN JEWS'  LANGUAGE  BEHAVIOUR  IN  THE  1920s: 
AN  INDEX OF  UKRAINIAN  STATUS  Gennady  Estraikh 
40
L ite ra tu re
BABYLONIAN  CAPTIVI'IY  Ix;sya  IJkrainka 
45 
N ew s  From  U krain e  61 
Docum ents  &  R eports  84
Books  &   P eriodicals  87

2
THE  UKRAINIAN  REVIEW
E D IT O R IA L
The  current  issue  o f  The  U k ra in ia n   R eview   appears  at  a  time  when 
Ukrainians,  at  home  and  in  the  diaspora,  are  commemorating  the  sixtieth 
anniversary  of the  man-made  famine  of  1932-33.  This  was  a  disaster,  which, 
at  the  most  cautious  estimates,  caused  the  death  by  starvation  and  famine- 
related disease  of at  least seven  million  inhabitants  of Ukraine —  the  land  so 
long  famed  as  the  bread-basket  of Europe.  It  was  a  disaster  that,  at the  time, 
was  relatively  little  understood  abroad.  The  “intellectual  Left”  of those  years, 
naively  endorsing  the  Soviet  propaganda  in  a  manner  which  cannot  but  call 
into  doubt  cither  their  intellectual  honesty  or  their  perspicacity,  did  its  best 
to  deny  that  the  famine  was  taking  place  at  all.  Those  journals  which  were 
prepared  to  give  credence  to  the  reports  from  Ukraine  (and  to  campaign,  in 
consequence,  for  a  boycott  of  trade  with  the  USSR),  nevertheless  did  not 
fully  comprehend  the  situation.  They  knew  that  the  famine  was  no  natural 
disaster;  that  neither  flood,  drought,  crop-disease  nor  insect  plague  was  to 
blame,  and  that  its  causes  lay  with  the  Soviet  planners  in  Moscow.  But  the 
humane  and  gentlemanly  editors  and  journalists  of  sixty  years  ago  simply 
took  this  to  mean  that  somewhere  there  had  been  a  gigantic  mistake  in  the 
Plan,  that  “someone  had  blundered”  on  a  scale  to  make  the  Charge  of  the 
Light  B rig ad e  or  the  sa fe ly   p re ca u tio n s  for  the  T it a n ic   p ale  in to 
insignificance.  The  true  horror  was  beyond  their  com prehension  and 
imaginings.  For  the  famine  was  no  mistake.  It  was  a  piece  of  deliberate 
social  engineering,  designed  to  force  Ukrainian  farmers  into  the  Collective 
Farms,  and  to  destroy  (by  deportation  or  death)  the  “kulaks”,  that  is  all 
those  who  resisted  collectivisation,  or  in  any  way  expressed  their  hostility  to 
Soviet  rule.
The  full  story  of  the  famine  has  yet  to  be  told.  As  the  former  Soviet 
s p e ls k r a n y
  and  secret  archives  are  gradually  unlocked,  historians  will 
u n d o u b te d ly   p re se n t  us  with  key  d o cu m en ts  and  the  day  to  day 
administrative  minutiae  o f  those  years  o f  “genocide  by  hunger”.  In  the 
meantime,  Dr.  Robert  Conquest’s  great  study,  H arvest  o f  Sorrow   remains, 
undoubtedly,  the  most  com prehensive  English-language  work  on  the 
subject.
As  new  material  emerges,  'The  U krainian  Review,  will  undoubtedly  return 
many  limes  to  this  theme.  In  the  meantime,  to  mark  the  anniversary,  we 
present  two  items:
a  moving  piece  of  oratory  from  one  of  Ukraine’s  leading  contemporary 
poets  and  writers,  Ivan  Drach,  and,  from 
1933, 
a  hitherlo-unrem arked 
collection  of letters  from  victims  of the  famine. 


3
60th Anniversary of the 1932-33 Famine
W ILL  R U SS IA   REPENT?
Address at the International Academic Conference 
“Famine 1932-1933 in  Ukraine”
Ivan Drach
There  is  nothing  more  terrifying  than  looking  down  an  abyss  into  which 
you  are  afraid  to  fall.  They  took  a  people  o f tillers  and  singers  and  tried  to 
turn  them  into  a  people  o f cannibals  and  thieves.  The  brand  of  1933  burns 
yet  upon  the  forehead  of  our  being.  We  arc  still  wailing  for  the  Russia  of 
Yeltsin  and  Khasbulatov  to  do  penance  for  the  sins  of  the  Russia  of  Lenin 
and  Stalin.  We  offer  the  Russians  the  model  of the  guilt  of Germany  towards 
the Jews  and  how  Adenauer  did  penance  for  the  guilt  of  Hiller.  But  first  let 
us  look  into  our own  hearts.
The  Bolshevik  oprichn iki'  in  Ukraine  were  mobilised  from  Ukrainians 
too,  and  the  penitential  blood  o f  Khvylovyi  and  Skrypnyk2  cannot  wash 
away  the sins  committed  by  millions  against  millions.
Ten  years  ago,  the  three-m illion-strong  Communist  Party  o f  Ukraine 
received  an  instruction,  signed  by  Kaplo  and  Mukha,  “On  the  fiftieth 
anniversary  o f  the  so-called  famine  of  1933”.  Ten  years  ago,  too,  the 
Ambassador  of  the  USSR  to  Canada  —   the  man  who  would  later  become 
the  architect  of Gorbachev’s  p erestroika —-  was  organising  a  hunt  for  diplo­
mats  and  journalists  abroad,  in  order  to  suppress  the  truth  about  1933, 
which  our  fellow  countrymen  in  the  USA  and  Canada  were  trying  to  pro­
claim  to  the  world.  And  the  fact  that  the  Politburo  Archives,  and  now  the
Ivan  Drach,  a  poet  and  people's  deputy,  was  die  founder  and  first  chairman  o f  the  Popular 
Movement  of  Ukraine (Rukh).  Drach  is  also  the  first  Secretary  of the  Kyiv  branch  of the  Writers' 
Union  of Ukraine  and  the chairman  of the  "Ukraina”  Society.
1  O prichnina  was  the  private  court  created  by  Tsar  Ivan  IV  the  Terrible  (1565)  that  adminis­
tered  the  Russian  lands  (also  know  as  oprichnina)  that  had  been  separated  from  the  rest  of 
Muscovy  and  placed  under  the  Tsar’s  direct  control.  The  term  also  refers  to  the  reign  of terror, 
which was  conducted  by  the  oprichniki,  members  of the Tsar's  new  court.
2  Mykola  Khvylovyi  (1893-1933),  a  writer  and  Soviet  Ukrainian  political  and  cultural  activist. 
Committed  suicide  in  1933.  Mykola  Skrypnyk  (1872-1933),  political  and  party  activist  o f  the 
Soviet  Ukrainian  government.  Member  o f  the  Politburo  o f  the  Central  Committee  o f  the 
Communist  Parly  of  Ukraine.  Head  of the  Soviet  government  in  Ukraine  from  1918.  Committed 
suicide  in  1933.

4
THE  UKRAINIAN  REVIEW
Archives  o f  Yeltsin  are  classified  lop  secret  clearly  shows  where  the  heads 
o f the  "famine  committees”  were  born  and  continue  to  be  born.
The  famine  of  1932-33  was,  of its  very  nature,  not  accidental.  Nor  was  it  a 
unique  episode  in  the  fate  of  the  Ukrainian  people.  The  time  has  come  to 
grasp  the  fact,  once  and  for  all  that  this  was  only  a  stage  —   albeit  the  one 
closest  to  us,  Ukrainians,  who  survived  and  exist  today,  o f  the  systematic 
rooting  out  of  the  Ukrainian  nation.  For  a  deep-seated  reluctance  to  accept 
the  very  existence  of our  nation  is  prevalent  among  the  heirs  of those  of the 
northern  tribes,  to  whom  our  people  gave  its  faith,  culture,  civilisation  and 
even  name.  And  therefore,  not  just  since  the  beginnings  of  the  Muscovite 
Tsardom,  but  right  back  in  the  lime  of  the  Grand  Dukes,  and  the  era  o f 
Andrei  Bogolyubskiy3  there  rolled  down  upon  Ukraine-Rus'  ceaseless  waves 
o f  hate,  cruelty,  the  total  destruction  of  everything  Ukrainian,  which  this 
provincial  northern  princeling  brought  to  Kyiv,  plundering  it  several  decades 
before  Khan  Batu.  The  testament  of  this  barbarian  is,  as  it  were,  imprinted 
on  the  genes  of  all  Muscovite  and  Petersburg  rulers  irrespective  of  their 
blood.  German  or  Georgian  —   every  one  of  them  proved  an  implacable 
enemy  of  Ukrainiandom  even  when  our  leaders  kowtowed  in  submission 
and  obedience  before  them.  It  seems  that  none  of  the  Russian  rulers  ever 
forgoL  to  extirpate  the  Ukrainian  language  and  culture  or  refrain  from 
spilling  rivers  of  Ukrainian  blood,  nor  from  taking  and  ever  taking  endless 
convoys  of  Ukrainian  helots  for  the  “construction”  of  their  boggy  North  and 
their  Siberia,  “loo  vast  to  cross”.“*
The  wily  epigram,  that  the  only  thing  which  history  leaches  is  that  it 
does  not  leach  anything,  is  not  for  us,  Ukrainians.  It  is  a  masterpiece  of 
those  who  would  wish  mankind  to  forget  the  diabolical  marks  they  have  set 
upon  history,  to  escape  from  the  judgment  of God  and  o f  men.  Oblivion  is 
the  testament  for  the  successors  of  the  hangmen.  Eternal  memory  is  the 
sacred  lesson  for  the  successors  of  the  innocent  slain.  These  lessons  which 
Ukrainiandom  has  to  learn  and  is  at  last  beginning  to  learn.
The  first  lesson,  which  is  already  becoming  an  inseparable  part  of  the 
national  consciousness  of  Ukrainians  is  that  Russia  never  had,  has  not  and 
so  far  shows  no  signs  of ever  having  other  intentions  towards  Ukraine  than 
the  total  destruction  of the  Ukrainian  nation.  We  can  see  that,  from  the  most 
refined  philosopher  to  the  greediest  alcoholic,  too  many  Russians  have  been 
inculcated  with  a  fatal  fixation  —   Ukrainophobia.  This  constitutes  one  of the 
principal  elements  o f the  “Russian  idea”.  It  today  is  boiling  over  into  a  fren­

Andrei  liogolyubskiy  (b.  c. 
11ll
—d. June 
117-1). 
Prince  of the  Rostov-Suzdal  principality  in 
the  northeastern  Rus'  lands 
(1157) 
and  grand  prince  of Vladimir (1169).  In  a  bid  to  extend  his 
authority  over  other  Itus'  principalities,  Bogolyubskiy  sacked  Kyiv  in  1169,  acquiring  the  title 
grand  prince.
“*  Phrase  quoted  from  the  poem  "The  Caucasus”  of  Ukraine’s  national  poet Taras Shevchenko 
(18Ki-186l),  where  it  occurs  in  a  passage setting  out  the  theory  and  ambitions of Russian  impe­
rialism.

60th ANNIVERSARY OF THE  1932-33  FAMINE
5
zied,  truly  b io lo g ica l  h aired   tow ards  U krainiandom   in  the  Russian 
Parliament.  Engraved  on  the  walls  of the  towns  of Crimea  one  may  read:  “A 
good  Ukrainian  is  a  dead  Ukrainian!".  This  diabolical  fixation  has  already 
ex ceed ed   the  chronic  (academ ic  and  black  hundred)  anti-Semitism  of 
Russian  “passionarias”.  This  mania  deadly  for  Ukrainians  and  self-destructive 
for  the  Russians  themselves  dictates  every  step,  every  word,  every  gesture 
towards  Ukraine  on  the  part  of  the  present  leadership  in  Moscow  too,  the 
political,  military,  economic,  academic  and  cultural  generals  in  whatever 
clothing  they  disguise  themselves.  We  have  to  state  that  today  we  are 
approaching  the  culmination  of  several  hundred  years  of  Great  Russian 
racism,  Russian  Nazism  as  a  world-view  and  as  a  spiritual  base,  it  would 
seem,  a  campaign  for  a  final  solution  —   the  destruction  of  the  Ukrainian 
nation.  If someone  still  has  some  doubts  and  has  failed  to  notice  that  Yeltsin 
suffers  from  an  Andrei  Bogolyubskiy  complex,  then  he  should  think  over, 
once  more,  what  lies  behind  the  psychological,  economic,  political,  cultural- 
informational,  and  also  military,  totalitarian  terror  which  has  been  the  sole 
content  of  Russian  policy  towards  Ukraine  since  our  declaration  of  indepen­
dence.  It  is  not  just  Sevastopil  or  Donbas  which  is  at  stake.  The  primary 
issue  is  the  claim  that  “Kiyev  [Russian  spelling]  —   is  the  mother  of  Russian 
cities”.  To  blot  out  this  idea  from  the  soul  of  the  average  Russian  is  as 
impossible  as  to  blot  out  from  the  soul  of the  average  Ukrainian  that  Kyiv  is 
the  capital  of Ukraine.
I  am  not  saying  this  in  order  to  cultivate  a  reciprocal  haired  for  Russians 
to  balance  that  which  the  Russians  are  pumping  out  at  full  strength  every 
day  against  Ukrainians.  The  honour  and  dignity  of  our  nation  over  thou­
sands  of  years  has  lain  in  respect  for  other  peoples,  even  for  enemies.  The 
crux  of  the  matter  is  that  to  our  tolerance  we  must  add  more  than  hitherto 
national  fortitude,  national  discretion,  national  steadfastness  and  wisdom. 
Ukrainians  do  not  aspire  towards  war  with  Russia,  but  are  forced  to  prepare 
for  the  worst.  Ukrainians  do  not  aspire  to  live  and  to  manage  their  affairs  to 
the  detriment  o f  Russia,  but  do  have  to  learn  not  to  com prom ise  their 
national  and  economic  interests.  Ukrainians  do  not  reject  Russian  culture, 
but  are  obliged  in  the  last  resort  to  be  able  to  develop  an  immunity  to  its 
not simply  cultural,  racist  aggression  and  its  intolerance  towards  the  spiritual 
acquisitions  of  other  peoples.  Ukrainians  will  not  renounce  Orthodoxy,  but 
want  their  own  Church,  not  the  religious  fanaticism  of  Muscovite  imperial­
ism  thrust  upon  them  in  its  place.  This  is  the  message  that  comes  to  us  and 
our  descendants  from  the  millions  of  radiant  souls  of  Ukrainian  women  and 
children  from  the  dark  times  of  1932-33-  Let  us  hear  them!
The  second  lesson  of  the  mass  slaughter  of  the  Ukrainians  in  the  killing 
grounds  of  our  neighbouring  Molochs  is  one  of  which  in  all  probability  we 
have  hardly  come  to  grips  with.  Even  if  one  of  us  or  some  neighbour  had 
come  to  believe  that  Ukrainians  were  doomed  to  be  a  victim-nation,  never­
theless  in  750  years  of  statelessness  we  have  proved  to  the  w hole  of 
mankind  that  we  arc  an  immortal  nation.  It  is  possible  that  in  this  lies  the

6
THE  UKRAINIAN  REVIEW
cosmic  sense  of our  tragic  situation,  in  the  half-dead  existence  to  which  for­
eigners  have  periodically  reduced  Ukrainians,  and  our  inevitable  resurrec­
tions,  and  powerful  upsurging  of the  will  of the  nation  to  life.  So  it  was  after 
the  invasion  of the  Talar  horde,  after  the  millions-slrong  slavery  to  the  Turks 
and  Tatars,  after  impaling  and  quartering  by  the  Polish  nobility,  after  the 
thrce-hundred-year-long  spiritual  and  physical  holocaust  carried  out  by  ihe 
Russians.
Viable  historical  nations  reveal  an  instructive  feature:  they  never  forget 
the  victims  suffered  by  their  past  generations.  Por  the  Jew s,  Armenians, 
Bulgarians  and  various  nations  whom  other  oeoples  tired  to  wipe  from  the 
face  of the  earth,  the  continuity  of national  existence  was  always  associated, 
in  particular,  with  the  unfading  memory  of  irreplaceable  losses  to  their  eth­
nos,  and  the  feeling  of  a  genetic  blood  link  with  ancestors  who  were 
destroyed  only  because  they  they  remained Jews,  Armenians,  or  Bulgarians. 
There  is  now  documentary  evidence  that  almost  one  third  of  our  peasants 
were  killed  sixty  years  ago  simply  because  they  were  and  wanted  to  remain 
Ukrainians.  But,  Ukrainians  ended  up  in  the  most  terrible  situation:  the 
Ukrainian  stock  was  consistently  rooted  out  in  cannibalistic  style  and  at  the 
same  time  it  was  diabolically  forbidden  not  only  to  count  those  murdered, 
but  even  to  keep  the  very  memory  of them.
The  Jewish  people  and  the  Stale  of  Israel,  reborn  after  2000  years,  have 
forced  the  whole  world  to  acknowledge  its  guilt,  especially  after  the  Nazi 
holocaust  of World  War  II.  The Jews  have  received  an  international  mandate 
to  hunt  down,  without  Statute  of  Limitations,  those  who  sought  to  destroy 
their  nation,  and  go  on  doing  this,  unwearingly,  and  actively,  as  if the  trail  of 
blood  were  still  fresh.  We  know  that  the  German  people  has  done  penance 
before  the Jews  and,  in  spite  of their  tradition  of thrift  even  in  minor  matters, 
has  not  only  acknowledged  its  moral  guilt,  but  is  also  paying  financial  com­
pensation  to  the  next-of-kin'of  the  victims  of  Nazism,  even  though  it  has 
renounced  the  Nazi  ideology.  We  do  not  have  to  demonstrate  that  today’s 
Russia  is  the  heir  of  both  of  the  Russian  Tsars  and  the  Russian  Bolsheviks; 
Moscow  has  itself  asserted  this  and  is  loudly  maintaining  that  it  is  the  legal 
successor  of  both  empires  —   the  “White"  and  the  “Red”.  The  prophets  of 
“Russianness”  from  Berdyayev  to  Zyuganov,  from  Brother  Pilofei  in  the  15th 
century'  to  the  contemporary'  prince  of  the Muscovite  Church,  Metropolitan 
Ioann  of St.  Petersburg,  have  indignantly  rejected  the  very  idea  that  autocratic 
despotism  or  Bolshevik  terrorism  is  not  an  integral  factor  of  Russian  history' 
and  deduce  that  these  regimes  which  are  apparently  so  different  arc  in  fact 
only  variant  forms,  modifications  of  the  continuity  of  existence  of  the  Great 
Russians  as  natural  and  eternal  statist-imperialists.  And  everything  which  was 
done  in  the  name  of,  and  for  the  good  of,  Great  Russia.
The  Russian  ideologues,  both  old  and  new,  assert  their  juridical  and  ethi-. 
cal  premises  according  to  which  Ukraine  has  the  right  to  submit  a  bill  for 
• ye  Famine  o f  1932-33  to  the  present  Russian  Federation.  The  “Russian  idea” 
and  its  practice  still  have .not  reached  an  estimate  of the  slaughter  in  Ukraine
1   ...   18   19   20   21   22   23   24   25   ...   44




Ma'lumotlar bazasi mualliflik huquqi bilan himoyalangan ©fayllar.org 2020
ma'muriyatiga murojaat qiling