Editorial board slava stetsko


Download 16.82 Mb.
Pdf ko'rish
bet25/44
Sana15.12.2019
Hajmi16.82 Mb.
1   ...   21   22   23   24   25   26   27   28   ...   44

2 2
THE  UKRAINIAN  REVIEW
former  Soviet  republics  is  Russia.  Consequently,  Ukrainian  leaders  have 
sought  other  sources  of  assistance  and  support  to  improve  their  country’s 
economic  situation.  When  visiting  Iran,  the  Ukrainian  speaker  o f  Parliament 
stated  that  “cooperation  between  Iran  and  the  newly  independent  Central 
Asian  republics  and  Ukraine  will  help  consolidate  the  independence  of 
those  stales”,  and  that Tehran  should  help  Kyiv  “further  consolidate  its  inde­
pendence”.9
Such  statements  confirm  the  views  of  the  present  Iranian  leadership  who 
warn  the  former  Soviet republics  to avoid  falling into  the  “trap  of the  West”.10
Tehran  is  pleased  that  ideology  and  oil  wealth  are  acting  to  extend  its 
influence  in  the  former  Soviet  territories.  However,  in  the  case  of  the 
Christian  Ukraine,  only  the  second  factor  applies.
Both  Ukraine  and  Iran  are  concerned  about  Russia’s  ambitions  in  the 
newly  independent  states.  Russian  military  intervention  in  Tajikistan  (a 
country  with  a  Persian-speaking  population),  and  Russia’s  dispute  with 
Ukraine  over  the  Black  Sea  Fleet  and  the  Crimean  peninsula,  provide  a  com­
mon  ground  for  Kyiv-Tehran  consultations.
In  appraising  Iran’s  relations  with  Ukraine,  the  Turkish  factor  should  also 
be  taken  into  consideration.  Turkey  and  Iran  share  an  interest  in  the  Central 
Asian  and  Caucasian  republics,  which  has  been  interpreted  as  a  competition. 
In  view  of Turkey’s  lead  over  Iran  in  the  Black  Sea  region  and  the  Turkish  ini­
tiative  in  setting-up  the  Black  Sea  economic  zone,  Iran’s  intention  to  find  a 
foothold  in  this  region,  through  Ukraine —  and  Georgia —   is  understandable.
Finally,  Iranian  leaders  are  pleased  with  Ukraine’s  humane  treatment  of 
the  Crimean  Muslim  Tatars  who  are  willing  to  return  to  their  homeland  in 
the  Ukrainian  territory. 

'   Tehran  Times,  May 
13,  1993- 
10  Ibid.

CURRENT AFFAIRS
2 3
T H E   STATE  OF  TH E   U K R A IN IA N   HEALTH  S E R V IC E
Prof.  B.H.  Iskiv
Providing  national  health  care  is  a  complicated  and  complex  issue,  which 
includes  economic,  ecological,  socio-psychological,  public  health,  financial, 
demographic,  educational  and strictly  medical  aspects.
It  is  widely  believed  that  it  is  principally  medics  who  are  involved  with 
health  care.  In  actual  fact,  their  work  caters  for  only  about  10-15%  of health 
care  needs.
In  the  broad  sense  of the  word,  health  care  is  an  issue  which  touches  the 
life  o f the  individual,  society,  and  the  nation.
The  last  few  years  have  been  fruitful  in  concepts,  doctrines  and  health 
care  programmes  of the  Ukrainian  people.
I  should  like,  first  of  all,  to  expound  the  following  concept  as  the  basis 
for  a  contemporary  doctrine  on  health  care  of the  Ukrainian  people.
1.  The  basis  of the  health  care  system  must  be  the  principle  of multilateral 
improvement  of  the  physical  and  psychological  strength  of  the  Ukrainian 
people  as  a  whole,  as  well  as  every  individual  citizen  regardless  of  his  or 
her  material  status.
2.  To  implement  this  principle,  the  state,  community  and  private  sectors 
have  to work  together  in  harmony  to build  and  operate  the health  care system.
3.  The  health  care  system  in  Ukraine  must  include  measures  to:
a)  improve  the  general  health  of the  population;
b)  strengthen  the  physical  and  psychological  health  of the  nation;
c)  prevent  disease,  reduce  the  morbidity  and  mortality  rates,  increase  the 
birth  rate,  increase  life-expectancy,  and  raise  the  capacity  for  work  of  the 
population;
d)  organise  public  health  and  prophylactic  services;
e)  organise  health-care  and  treatment  centres;
f)  provide  the  Ukrainian  armed  forces  with  the  best  possible  medical  ser­
vices  of all  kinds.
4.  Measures  for  the  health  care  of the  population,  that  is  health  care  legis­
lation,  public  health  and  prophylactic  programmes,  general  planning  of 
health  care,  the  establishment  of  a  network  of  public  health,  prophylactic 
and  treatment  services,  and  monitoring  of  the  whole  health  system,  and  in 
particular  medical  care,  must  be,  basically,  within  the  competence  of  state 
power and  guaranteed  by  the  state  budget.
5.  To  avoid  the  bureaucratisation  of medical  care  in  Ukraine,  primary,  that  is 
non-hospital  care,  should  be  based on a  network  of general  practitioners.
6.  Medical  establishments,  the  pharmaceutical  industry  and  retail  pharma­
cies  can  be  run  by  state,  community  or  cooperative  institutions  and  private

2 4
THE  UKRAINIAN  REVIEW
individuals.  All  these  institutions  and  businesses  will  be  monitored  by  the 
state  health  care  organs.
What  is  the  current  programme  of Ukraine’s  official  organs  of power  regard­
ing  the  health  care  of the  Ukrainian  people? On June  9,  1992,  a  bill  “On  health 
care”,  drafted  by  the  Ukrainian  Health  Ministry,  was  published,  debated  and 
enacted  as  a  law  by  Parliament.  This  bill  evoked  justified  criticism,  and  (in  the 
case  of certain  articles)  outright  indignation  among  medics.  Under  the  terms  of 
this  bill  the  I leallh  Ministry  would  retain  a  strict  centralised  control  over  the 
health  service,  allowing  no  administrative  autonomy.  The  preamble  and  intro­
ductory  paragraphs  of the  bill  were  ideologically  unsound  and  confused.
A  parliamentary  commission  on  health  care  then  drafted  a  new  bill,  enti­
tled"  “The  Fundamentals  of  the  health-care  legislation  of  Ukraine”.  This  bill 
was  passed  on  December  15,  1992,  after  a  one  and  a  half hour  debate,  with­
out  being  published  beforehand.  The  preamble  and  introductory  paragraphs 
o f this  law  have  a  more  democratic  character  than  the  first  bill,  and  the  pri­
ority  o f  health  care  in  the  activities  of  the  stale  is  stressed.  The  President  is 
stated  to  be  the  guarantor  of the  right  of citizens  to  health  care.
Unfortunately,  many  provisions  of  the  “Fundamentals...”  take  on  a  ten- 
dencious  and  assertive  character.  There  arc  many  inadequacies  and  faults  in 
both  concepts  and  wording.
Thus,  in  article  /i,  “Fundamental  principles  of  health  care”  arc  staled  to 
include  a  "...  humanist  approach,  the  guaranteeing  of  the  priority  o f  com­
mon  human  values  over  class,  national,  group,  or  individual  interests...”. 
Are  national  values  not  “common  hum an”?  Why  stress  the  “humanist” 
approach,  so  downgrading  to  national  values,  and  ignoring  the  very  fact  of 
the  existence  of the  Ukrainian  people.
The  “Fundamentals..."  make  no  distinction  between  the  two  concepts 
“health  care  system”  and  “medical  care  system”,  and  fail  to  specify  the  tasks 
and  responsibilities  of the  various  organs  and  institutions  of the  non-medical 
part  of  the  health  care  sector.  They  stipulate  a  centralised  administration  of 
the  health  service,  give  legal  force  to  the  social  inequality  of citizens  (special 
medical  establishments  for  the  privileged  elite),  give  unlimited  power  to  the 
bosses  of  medical  care  establishments,  and  cast  doubt  on  the  need  for  pub­
lic  monitoring  of the  management  of medical  establishments.
A  law  should  take  a  long-term  view,  and  it  is  the  task  of  the  stale  to 
ensure  its  citizens  not  a  minimum  standard  of  living,  but  a  decent  one.  This 
means  that  the  percentage  of the  national  income  represented  by  ihc  wage 
fund  should  gradually  increase  so  that  workers  will  have  sufficient  funds  to 
renew  their  physical  and  psychological  forces,  and  to  ensure  ihe  normal 
upbringing  and  development  of their  children.
Is  a  reform  of  the  health  service  possible  without  the  establishment  of an 
effective  watch-dog  system  to  monitor  the  management  of  medical  establish­
ments?  Such  a  system,  working  on  the  principles  of  independence,  impar­
tiality  and  justice,  would  do  much  to  resolve  all  the  problems  which  sur­
round  the  provision  of health  care.

CURRENT AFFAIRS
2 5
The  establishment  of the  young  Ukrainian  state  is  fraught  with  difficulties. 
The  catastrophic  economic  situation  is  having  a  painful  effect  on  all  spheres 
of life,  and  on  the  health  of the  people,  perhaps  most  of all.
One  must  not  forget  that  Ukraine  inherited  from  her  colonial  status  in  the 
USSR,  the  degradation  of her soil,  forests,  and  aquifers,  as  well  as  the  plun­
dering  o f  her  mineral  resources,  outmoded  agriculture,  disproportionately 
developed  industry  (catering  first  and  foremost  to  the  needs  o f the  military- 
industrial  complex),  and  a  very  poorly-developed  medical  and  pharmaceuti­
cal  industry,  as  the  total  lack  o f production  facilities  for vaccines  can  testify.
The  main  emphasis  in  the  health  service  was  put  on  quantitative  indices: 
the  increase  in  medical  staff and  the  number  o f hospitals,  the  construction  of 
giant  medical  centres  to  order  and  for  the  party  n om en klatu ra.  There  was 
virtually  no  up-to-date  medical  technology,  and  primary  health  care  was 
utterly  neglected,  particularly  in  the  rural  areas,  and  the  majority  of  clinics. 
Despite  a  huge  number  of  doctors  (in  1982  —   195,600,  or  38,900  per  10 
thousand  inhabitants)  and  medical  establishments  (3,808  with  652,500  beds), 
Ukraine  did  not  mange  to  prevent  the  process  of depopulation.  The  mortali­
ty  rale  in  Ukraine  is  several  times  higher  than  in  the  developed  countries 
(from  accidents  and  poisoning —   1.5  to  2  times,  from  cardiovascular  disease 
—   50-80%,  and  from  respiratory  disease  —  30-40%).
The  average  life  expectancy  of the  Ukrainian  population  is  70.9  years  (66.4 
years  for  men,  and  74.8  for  women).  In  western  countries  the  average  life 
expectancy  for  men  is some 6-9 years  greater,  and  for women —  4-6  years.
In  general,  the  high  mortality  rate  is  caused  by  such  factors  as  the  poor 
state  of  the  health  service,  bad  working  and  living  conditions,  the  environ­
ment,  and  individual  lifestyles.  In  Ukraine  the  mortality  rate  of men  of work­
ing  age  has  been  on  the  increase  for  a  considerable  time.  Men  of this  group 
arc  dying  more  frequently  than  women  from  accidental  poisoning  and  other 
accidents  (4.5  limes),  from  diseases  to  the  circulation  system  (1.4  times),  res­
piratory  diseases  (2.3  times),  and  cancer  (1.9  times).
The  medical-demographic  indices  of the  Ukrainian  population  are  causing 
considerable  alarm.  The  dynamics  of these  indices  indicate  a  drastic  deterio­
ration  of the  health  of the  nation.  The  overall  mortality  index  has  increased 
over  the  past  few  years  and  now  equals  11.6  per  1,000  inhabitants.  This  fig­
ure  is  significantly  higher  than  for  the  countries  o f western  Europe.
The  birth  rate  in  Ukraine,  which  in  1913  amounted  to  44  per  thousand 
inhabitants,  under  Soviet  rule  fell  constantly  and  presently  amounts  to  12.7 
per  thousand.
The  decline  in  the  reproduction  rate  is  not  conducive  to  socio-economic 
development.
In  Ukraine  only  56%  of  families  have  children;  every  second  family  has 
only  one  child.  Forty  thousand  women  a  year  have  abortions  and  out  of 
every  1,000  infants,  14  are  still-born.
The  decline  in  population  process  began  in  1979  in  the  villages,  and  in  the 
1990s  in  the  cities.  In  1970  the  natural  increase  of the  population  amounted  to

26
THE  UKRAINIAN  REVIEW
more  than  300,000  a  year,  in  1980 —  174,000,  and in  1990 —  28,000.  In  the vil­
lages  the  number  of deaths  exceeded  the  number  of births  by  58,000.  In  1992 
the  death  rate  increased  three  times,  exceeding the  birth  rate  by  120,000.
The  reasons  are  generally  known.  Today  it  is  not  only  individual  doctors, 
scientists,  and  journalists  who  are  sounding  the  alarm,  and  describing  the 
present  tragic  situation  of the  Ukrainian  people.  There  are  hundreds  o f insti­
tutes  and  committees,  although  no  top-level  national  demographic  commit­
tees  or  institutes,  which  would  be  able  to  resolve  the  demographic  crisis.
What  practical  measures  can  be  taken  to  improve  the  health  service,  and 
where  to  begin  this  process  so  far  remain  unclear.
The  weakest  link  in  the  health  service  is  the  polyclinics.  Are  the  people 
satisfied  with  the  system  of. district  service  by  therapists  and  paediatricians? 
Are  doctors  and  nurses  themselves  satisfied  with  this  system,  and  do  they 
receive  adequate  pay  for  their  hard  work?  During  outbreaks  of  influenza, 
district  therapists  frequently  dish  out  sick  notes  to  patients  without  so  much 
as  feeling  their  pulse.  And  if  a  patient  suffers  from  hearing  or  sight  prob­
lems,  or  problems  with  the  nervous  system,  they  are  completely  helpless.  To 
improve  the  health  service,  judging  from  the  experience  of  other  countries, 
the  polyclinics  need  to  start  training  family  doctors  who  would  be  interested 
in  good  salaries,  and  thus  will  know  and  be  able  to  do  a  lot.  One  should 
think  how  to  rationally  use  the  huge  polyclinics,  whose  offices  can  be  rent­
ed  out  to  individual  family  doctors.
The  cost  of  hospital  care  in  Ukraine  is  a  huge  drain  on  the  state.  The 
experience  of developed  countries  indicates  that  the  huge  hospitals  we  have 
in  Ukraine  are  not  cost-effective.  The  introduction  of  proper  medical  and 
surgical  standards  must  be  deferred.  This  type  of  reconstruction  will  mean 
abolishing  the  obsolete  preference  indices  of medical  hospitals.
The  introduction  o f  the  standards  accepted  in  the  civilised  world  will 
allow  the  duration  of in-patient  treatment  to  be  reduced,  save  money  which 
can  be  reassigned  to  the  acquisition  of  medical  technology,  release  space 
and  allow  the  establishment  of ancillary  services  and  departments  (remedial 
exercise,  massage,  physiotherapy,  etc.).
Finally,  one  should  think  about  payment  of  doctors,  employees  of  med­
ical  departments,  and  laboratory  staff  in  accordance  with  international 
scales,  and  to  improve  their working  conditions.
One  can  hardly  expect  the  health  of  the  Ukrainian  people  to  improve 
unless  the  medical  sector,  and  not  the  state  administrative  leadership,  is 
made  legally  responsible  for  health  care.
The  environment  and  recreational  facilities  have  been  extremely  neglect­
ed,  and  the  holiday  industry  barely  exists  at  all.
Workers,  and  in  particular  teenagers,  do  not  know  what  to  do  with  them­
selves  in  their  free  time.  Alcoholism,  drugs  and  crime  are  therefore  rampant. 
The  state  has  virtually  given  up  building gymnastic  and  sports  facilities.  New 
housing  developments,  as  a  rule,  lack  public  baths,  saunas,  not  to  mention 
stadiums  and  health  centres.

CURRENT AFFAIRS
27
The  anti-alcohol  and  anti-smoking  campaign  is  a  low  priority.
The  lack  o f  a  responsible  medical  staff  is  a  major  misfortune  for  the 
Ukrainian  nation.  The  party  n om en klatu ra  and  the  h o m o  Souieticus it  creat­
ed  in  medicine  and  its  administrative  system  has  an  overtly  anti-Ukrainian 
and  anti-democratic  orientation.  In  words  they  are  for  independence,  but 
take  independence  to  mean  an  all-embracing  permissiveness  and  indepen­
dence  from  their  own  people.  How  else  can  one  explain  the  disrespectful 
attitude  to  the  Ukrainian  language,  the  sabotage  of  medical  supplies,  the 
theft,  including  humanitarian  aid,  and  the  misuse  of positions.  For  them  the 
needs  of the  people  and  national  problems  are  completely  alien.
The  system  of  medical  education  in  Ukraine  needs  a  thorough  reform  at 
all  levels,  starting  with  medical  schools  and  institutes.
Some  positive  trends  may  be  observed  —   the  introduction  of  three-year 
internships,  the  establishment  of  new  Ukrainian  programmes  o f  post-diplo­
ma  studies,  and  the  computerisation  of the  education  process.
However,  h om o Sovieticus is  putting  up  overt  and  covert  resistance  to  the 
introduction  of  the  Ukrainian  language  in  the  teaching  process.  Some  pro­
fessors  are  totally  u n con cern ed   about  the  virtually  com p lete  lack  of 
Ukrainian  medical  literature,  and  the  training  of medical  staff with  a  sense  of 
responsibility  to  the  population  of Ukraine.
The  problems  are  enormous,  and  can  clearly  only  be  solved  by  an  inte­
grated  and  multi-disciplinary  approach. 

The Third Reich and the Ukrainian Question.
Documents 1934-1944
Wolodymyr Kosyk 
ISBN 0-902322-39-7
In  this  175-page  collection  Wolodymyr  Kosyk  subjects  the  Third  Reich's  attitude 
towards  the  Ukrainian  question  to  a  painstaking  analysis  by  compiling  and  com­
menting  on  the  crucial  documents  covering  a  decade  (1934-1944)  which  encom­
passes both peace and war.
This period  of German-Ukrainian  relations has  heretofore been  largely overlooked 
by  Ukrainian  and  other  scholars.  Thus,  Kosyk’s  attempt  is  a  pioneering  one.  He 
draws  the  materials  for  his  work  from  such  unimpeachable  sources  as:  the 
German  Federal  Archives  (civil  and  military),  the  German  Foreign  Ministry,  and 
the  International  Military Tribunal in  Nuremberg.
Published by the Ukrainian Central  Information  Service,  London 
Price: £8.00 ($15.00  US)
Orders to  be  sent to:  UCIS, 200 Liverpool  Road,  London  N1  1LF.

2 8
THE  UKRAINIAN  REVIEW
H IG H E R   EDUCATIO N  IN  U K R A IN E  — 
IN T E R N A T IO N A L   COLLABO RATIO N  IN  
D E VE LO PM EN T
David Randall
Higher  education  means  universities  and  colleges,  courses,  training,  edu­
cation,  research,  scholarship  and  enlightenment  by  a  variety  of  different 
methods  in  an  infinite  number  of  circumstances.  Quite  what  mix  of  higher 
education  institutions  and  higher  educational  provision  is  appropriate  for 
Ukraine  cannot be  elaborated  yet,  and  the  reasons  are  many.
In  the  first  place  the  demand  for  higher  education  in  Ukraine  has  not  been 
reliably  modelled,  nor can  there  be  any  reliable economic forecasts  upon  which 
to  propose  a  new  funding mechanism.  In  the second  place  the  research  has  not 
yet  been  done  into  labour  market  trends,  demography,  wastage,  student 
demand,  etc.,  in  order  to  map  the  existing  terrain,  which  in  most  countries  pro­
vides  the  background  for  higher  education  policy.  In  the  third  place,  it  is  not 
clear who  will  carry  out  the  economic  modelling,  or propose  a  funding  mecha­
nism,  or  research  labour  market  trends,  or  ask  the  students  what  they  want. 
Moreover,  it  is  not  clear  that  the  key  questions,  like  the  ones  above,  are  really 
being asked,  or that there  is  the intention,  awareness  or motivation to ask  them.
The  pressure  for  change  in  the  higher  sector  is  mainly  external,  in  that  it 
is  forced  by  economic  circumstances  and  the  absence  o f  ready  alternatives 
to  central  funding.  However,  the  pressure  for  change  is  unplanned  and  in  a 
very  real  sense,  change  itself is  out  of control.  Unfortunately,  nobody  seems 
to  care  much  about  this  in  the  West.
Foreign  news  teams  were  agog  when  the  break-up  of  the  Soviet  Union 
spelled  potential  civil  war  between  the  former  republics,  at  least  three  o f 
which  were  in  possession  of  nuclear  weapons  which  they  might,  it  was 
argued,  provoke  each  other  into  using.  Relations  between  Russia  and  Ukraine, 
given  the  bitter  dispute  over the  ownership  of the  Black  Sea  Fleet,  have  been 
at times  very  tense,  but  with  the  stakes  being so  high  the  most  powerful  states 
of the  CIS  have  successfully  resolved  their  differences  by  diplomatic  and  eco­
nomic  means.  Ukraine’s  offer  to  give  up  her  nuclear  weapons  was  a  calculat­
ed  gesture  of  peace  which  Britain  and  France  have  yet  to  venture,  although 
paradoxically,  it  is  the  civilian  use  of nuclear  power  which  causes  the  greatest 
damage,  and  which  continues  to  threaten  and  pollute.
Nuclear  issues  do  still  make  the  news  because  the  dangers  threaten 
everyone  in  Europe,  but  the  weariness  of  ordinary  people  struggling  with
David  Randall  is  the  East  European  Development  Officer at  Kingston  University.

CURRENT AFFAIRS
29
the  stress,  uncertainty  and  discomfort  o f the  economic  crisis  and  the  day-to- 
day  trials  of  the  new  Ukrainian  democracy  no  longer  get  reported  in  the 
g en eral  m edia.  Much  hot  air  and  film  footag e  is  still  ex p e n d ed   on 
Kremlinology.  The  machismo  of  the  leadership  battle  between  Yeltsin  and 
the  parliamentary  opposition  leading  up  to  the  April  1993  referendum  com­
pletely  dominated  the  “quality”  press  for  months,  at  the  exclusion  o f  all 
other  news  including  the  remarkable  turn-around  in  the  supply  of goods  to 
Russian stores.
The  uncomfortable  truth  is  that  the  struggle  for  democracy  is  only  really 
newsworthy  when  a  blood-bath  is  just  around  the  corner,  and  if  western 
audiences  cannot  have  their  blood,  then  they  can  be  tempted  by  tasty 
morsels  which  pander  to  their  ghoulishness  and  desire  for  self-aggrandise­
ment.  All  that  remains  of  the  1991  Coup-days  fascination  with  “freedom”  in 
the  USSR  is  quasi-investigative  reportage  about  the  rise  of  organised  crime, 
poverty  and  corruption,  the  collapse  of the  health  care  system  or  the  spread 
of drug  abuse,  prostitution  and  aids.
Somewhat  surprisingly,  the  media  seem  to  have  grown  tired  of  churning 
out  low-brow  titillation  from  eastern  Europe.  Perhaps  the  public  appetite  for 
such  material  was  not  limitless  after  all.  Nevertheless,  it  will  be  too  much  to 
expect' the  present  vacuum  of news  from  Ukraine  to  be  filled  with  insightful 
reporting  on  serious  change  issues.  That  never  was  the  case,  and  it  is  even 
less  probable  now.
The  mass  media  have  largely  failed  to  capture  either  the  detail  or  the 
essence  of  the  difficult  social  challenges  which  Ukrainians  face.  This  failing 
blunts  the  educative  impact  of  the  modern  communications  media,  and  at 
the  same  time  it  diminishes  the  power  of  the  media  to  enlist  appropriate 
overseas  support  for  burdensome  modernisation  processes.
Yet  in  spite  of the  lack  of information  on  life  in  Ukraine  in  general  as  well 
as  higher  education  in  particular,  there  has  been  expanding  cooperation 
between  Britain  and  Ukraine  since  the  lifting  of the  Iron  Curtain  and  subse­
quent  Ukrainian  independence.  The  reasons  for  this  lie  in  the  resourceful­
ness  of people  and  organisations  and  their  ability  to  get  on  with  life  on  their 
own  terms.  The  new  initiatives,  from  business  to  cultural  exchange  to  edu­
cation  and  training  may  be  motivated  by  self-interest,  sometimes  by  altruism, 
but  they  are  executed  by  independent  agents  in  pursuit  of  concrete  objec­
tivés;  objectives  beyond  the  dictates  of fashion.
The  role  of  higher  education  in  these  cooperative  processes  has  been  to 
find  ways  of coping  with  external  pressures  for  change  in  Ukrainian  educa­
tion.  The  responses  are  largely  locally  organised,  and  are  specific  to  particu­
lar universities  or other higher education  institutions.
Inter-governmental  initiatives  have,  of  course,  been  important  catalysts  in 
cooperation  between  partners,  particularly  in  the  area  of market  reforms  and 
inward  investment  in  the  private  sector  economy.  However,  government 
money  has  tended  to  favour  the  private  sector,  to  the  detriment  of inter-uni­
versity  cooperation,  and  the  private  sector  short  courses,  MBA  programmes
1   ...   21   22   23   24   25   26   27   28   ...   44




Ma'lumotlar bazasi mualliflik huquqi bilan himoyalangan ©fayllar.org 2020
ma'muriyatiga murojaat qiling