Editorial board slava stetsko


Download 16.82 Mb.
Pdf ko'rish
bet27/44
Sana15.12.2019
Hajmi16.82 Mb.
1   ...   23   24   25   26   27   28   29   30   ...   44

37
Shapovalov  dodges  the  rocket  fuel  theory  by  explaining  he  is  “not  quali­
fied  to  comment”.  Rocket  fuel  is  a  military  problem,  outside  the  realm  of chil­
dren’s  doctors,  and  can  only  be  dealt  with  by specialists;  i.e.  the  military”.
“One  day,  they  may  say  what  really  happened.  Maybe  there  is  too  much 
secrecy  in  this  country”,  he  adds.  Then,  reflectively:  “It is  natural  for any  military 
organisation  to  cover  up  this  problem.  It would be  the  same  in your country”.
Then,  with  even  more  surprising  candour,  Shapovalov  suggests  a  reason 
why  the  military  will  not  acknowledge  the  fuel  spillage:  if shown  to  be  the 
cause  of  the  illness,  they  would  be  forced  to  pay  compensation.  And  they 
cannot  afford  the  money  to  do  so.
In  a  flat  in  the  poor  part  of town,  a  meeting  is  taking  place  —   a  meeting  of 
the  Mother’s  Committee  for  the  social  protection  of  the  rights  of  the  children 
who  fell  ill  with  chemical  intoxication  in  1988.  The  committee  represents  the 
185  children  who went bald and  were  taken  to Kyiv  and Moscow  for tests.
“T h ey  are  still  sick,  nothing  has  ch a n g ed ”,  says  chairm an  Halyna 
Khomenko.  “Ukraine  is  ashamed  to  tell  the  truth  o f these  children”.
The  Mothers  Committee  followed  their  sick  children  to  Kyiv  and  Moscow 
for  three  months  of  tests.  They  were  never  informed  of  the  results  and  are 
incredulous  that  now,  five  years  later,  they  are  still  no  closer  to  the  truth. 
Even  in  the  case  of  the  children  whose  condition  has  recently  deteriorated, 
the  doctors  refuse  to  link  this  to  the  original  illness.
The  mothers  believe  the  rocket  fuel  caused  the  illness,  and  that  their children 
were  contaminated  while  playing  in  the  street.  They  claim  that  the  children 
would not have  become  ill  if warnings  had been  issued at the  time  of the spill.
“Our  children  were  in  good  health  before  1988,  but  soon  after  the  acci­
dent,  all  their  hair  fell  out.  We  know  that  they  were  poisoned  with  chemi­
cals.  What else  could  it be?”  says  one  mother.
“On  the  quiet doctors  have  told  us  to  get  out  of Chernivtsi  if we  want  our 
children  to  recover.  But  they  won’t  say  it  officially”,  says  Khomenko.  “But 
where  can  we  go? We  can’t  afford  to  leave”.
Chernivtsians,  like  most  western  Ukrainians,  were  especially  glad  to  see 
the  end  of  the  Soviet  Union.  A  region  that,  historically,  leant  west  to  the 
Austro-Hungarian  empire  for  cultural  ties,  it  only  came  under  the  hammer 
and  sickle  in  1939.  Communism  was  never  widely  accepted  and  most  peo­
ple  stuck  to  their  Christian  beliefs.  They  suffered  in  return.  It  is  rare  to  meet 
a  Ukrainian  who  did  not  have  at  least  one  grandfather  murdered  in  Stalin’s 
purges.  As  recently  as  four  years  ago  they  were  still  being  discriminated 
against:  40  per  cent  of  the  soldiers  sent  to  Afghanistan  were  from  western 
Ukraine.  “Our  punishment  for  being  Christian  was  to  have  to  go  and  fight 
Moslems”  was  how  one  veteran  put  it.
With  independence  in  1991,  therefore,  the  sick  children  o f  Chernivtsi 
thought  their  problems  would  be  over.  Why,  hadn’t  the  new  world  order 
been  ushered  in  on  a  wave  of “eco-glasnost”?
Maybe  then,  but  not  any  more.  Whereas  environment  issues  were  a  safe 
focus  for  anti-establishment  sentiment  in  the  early  days,  the  new  republics

3 8
THE  UKRAINIAN  REVIEW
have  been  forced  to  put  “green”  issues  on  the  back  burner  as  they slide  into 
financial  ruin,  liven  Chornobyl  —   where  the  1986  accident,  in  some  experts’ 
opinion,  was  one  of the  factors  leading  to  the  break-up  of the  Soviet  Union 
—   may  soon  be  recommissioned  to  provide  much-needed  electricity  in  the 
present  power crisis.
With  the  econom ic  collapse  has  come  a  breakdown  o f  communication 
systems.  Telephones  are  increasingly  out  of  order  and  mail  rarely  gets 
through.  W estern  Ukraine,  though  geographically  clo ser  to  the  rest  o f 
Europe,  has  had  a  rude  awakening  to  its  dependence  on  Moscow  for  infor­
mation  from  the  outside  world.  And  the  free  world,  rather  than  ride  to 
Ukraine’s  aid  like  a  knight  in  shining  armour,  has  chosen  to  focus  its  assis­
tance  on  Russia  in  the  naive  notion  that  such  help  will  filter  through  to  the 
neighbouring  republics.
“In  some  ways  it  is  harder  io  cope  with  our  problems  now  than  it  was 
three  years  ago",  says  journalist  l.udmyla  Florivna  o f  the  weekly  “Young 
Bukovynian”  (Bukovyna:  the  bolder  area  between  Ukraine  and  Romania). 
“No  one  will  help  us  from  East  or West,  we  are  more  cut  off than  ever before. 
OK,  we  are  no  longer  influenced  by  Moscow,  but  neither  can  we  send  out 
information  or  receive  it.  We  can  hardly get enough  paper to go to  print”.
Florivna  rocked  Chcrnivtsi  five  years  ago  with  a  frank  expose  of  the  sick 
children  problem.  Until  then,  people  were  unaware  of the  extent  of the  suf­
fering.  For  her  pains,  Florivna  lost  her  job  (her  editor  fought  hard  with  the 
authorities  to  keep  her  on)  but  was  soon  reinstated  and,  after  indepen­
dence,  voted Journalist  of the  Year.
Like  Freylikh,  she  has  made  meticulous  research  of the  fuel  spill  theory  and 
believes  that  the  Rocket  Forces  are  the  most  likely  cause  of the  1988  illnesses.
“Wherever  we  have  military  establishments  we  have  ecological  problems. 
It  is  a  fact  of  life.  We  also  have  secrecy,  and  an  in-built  self-protection 
mechanism".
The  former  Soviet  intelligence  service  —   the  KGB  —   seems  to  have  sur­
vived  independence  to  re-emerge  mostly  intact  under  its  new  Ukrainian 
guise,  the  SBU.  In  Chcrnivtsi,  as  well  as  being  part  of the  investigating  com­
mittee,  they  seem  to  be  keeping  more  covert  tabs  on  the  rocket  fuel  contro­
versy  (“I  say,  ‘Hello,  Major’  when  I  pick  up  the  phone”,  was  how  one  cam­
paigner  put  it).  It  is  hard  to  gauge  their  goal  in  the  affair.  Certainly,  in  other 
parts  of  Ukraine,  the  former  KGB  have  proved  unlikely  allies  to  environ­
mental  campaigners.  In  Rivne  they  joined  forces  with  Greenpeace  to  publi­
cise  illicit  imports  of  toxic  waste  from  Germany.  In  Chcrnivtsi  their  hands 
may  be  lied.  A  former  KGB  officer  told  Florivna  that  “if the  rocket  fuel  scan­
dal  touches  the  former  Soviet  Union,  not  even  the  KGB  will  find  the  truth”.
Outside  verification  of  the  rocket  fuel  theory  is  equally  muddled.  What 
we  do  know  is  that  in  late  July  1988  a  lot  of  military  missiles  were  being 
moved  around.
This  was  the  year  of  the  INF  Treaty,  which  started  with  a  US-Soviet  pact 
to  scrap  the  bulk  of their  ground-based  medium-range  missiles.  The  Soviets

CURRENT AFFAIRS
3 9
had  begun  withdrawing  missiles  from  bases  in  Czechoslovakia  and  East 
Germany  in  February.  However,  the  destruction  of  the  SS-12  missiles  (one 
version  of  which  was  liquid-fuelled)  at  Sary-Ozek  in  Kazakhstan  did  not 
begin  until  August 2,  1988.
(The  Soviets,  quite  sensibly,  did  not  act  to  destroy  the  rockets  until  then, 
since  the  US  government  did  not  fully  ratify  the  treaty  until June).
Other  missiles  to  be  scrapped  under  INF  were  the  old  SS-4s,  also  liquid- 
fuelled  and  vehicle-transportable,  o f  which  there  were  bases  at  Kolomyia 
and  Skala  Podilska  —   both  within  50  miles  of  Chernivtsi.  It  is  also  known 
that  at  the  end  of July  long-range  Ukraine-based  SS-18  missiles  (though  not 
covered  by  the  INF Treaty)  were  being  transported  to  Russia  under  the  earli­
er SALT  agreements.  SS-18s  are  also  fuelled  with  liquid  dimethylhydrazine.
On  July  15  this  year,  the  Ukrainian  43rd  Rocket  Army  began  stripping 
down  the  first  of  ten  SS-19  missiles  (another  liquid-fuelled  rocket)  and,  as 
the  government  admitted  a  year  ago,  technicians  face  a  big  problem  of how 
to  handle  the  poisonous  propellants.  The  US  Congress  has  earmarked  $300 
million-worth  of technical  aid  to  Ukraine  to  help  the  disarmament  process.
If  the  testimony  of  Chernivtsi  is  true,  the  people  of  Ukraine  have  good 
reason  to  question  the  integrity  of their  military  leaders  and  the  government 
that  keeps  them  in  check.
Undoubtedly,  Chernivtsi  is  only  a  small  drop  in  the  ocean  o f  ecological 
disasters  facing  the  former  Soviet  Union  (take  Chornobyl  for  example).  But 
the  town  is  setting  an  example  others  can  follow.  Local  investigators  like 
Viktor  Freylikh  have  the  determination  to  bring  the  “old  system”  to  book 
and  to show  Ukraine’s  leaders  that  people  come  first. 


4 0
THE  UKRAINIAN  REVIEW
History
U K R A IN IA N   JE W S ’  LANG UAG E  B EHA VIO U R   IN  T H E  
1920s:  AN  IN D E X   OF  U K R A IN IA N   STATUS
Gennady Estraikh
In  1926,  the  1,574,000 Jews  of ihe  Ukrainian  Republic  made  up  more  lhan 
60%  o f ihe  enlire  Soviet Jewish  population.  The  20lh  century,  which  from  its 
very  beginning  was  fertile  in  wars,  revolutions,  pogroms,  starvations  and 
migrations,  brought  tangible  changes  in  the  socio-demographic  physiogno­
my  of the  community.  In  the  vortex  of events  between  the  censuses  o f  1897 
and  1926,  the  Jewish  population  of  Soviet  Ukraine  (in  its  interwar  bound­
aries)  decreased  by  4.7%.’  Crucial  shifts  occurred  in  the  territorial  and  occu­
pational  distribution  T he  vector  of Jewish  internal  migration  became  direct­
ed  chiefly  from  small  market  towns  (shtellach)  towards  big  urban  centres, 
especially  outside  the  former  Pale  of Jewish  Settlement.  In  1926,  about  62% 
of  Ukraine’s Jews  lived  in  cities  and  towns,  29% —   in  shtellach,  and  9%  —  
in  villages.  About  28%  of them  were  concentrated  in  Kyiv,  Kharkiv,  Odessa, 
and  Dnipropetrovsk.  Relative  to  1897,  in  Kharkiv  the  number  of Jew ish 
dwellers  increased  sevenfold,  in  Kyiv  it  quadrupled,  in  Donbas  it  trebled.
It  is  no  coincidence  that  the  Jewish  population  of  the  industrial  regions 
showed  the  highest  level  of  language  assimilation.  Thus,  the  percentage  of 
Donbas  Jews  who  claimed  Yiddish  as  their  mother  tongue  was  50%  in  the 
Artemivsk  and  Luhansk  districts  and  38%  in  the  Stalino  district.  The  figure  for 
the  Kharkiv  district  was  11%,  and  for  the  Kyiv  district —  63%.  The  position  of 
Yiddish  was  not  very  strong  in  other  industrial  regions  either,  c.g.  49%  in  the 
Dnipropetrovsk  district,  58%  in  the  Odessa  district.  It  is  also  characteristic  that 
in  1927  less  than  one  third  of Jewish  Communists  from  the  industrial  districts
Gennady  Pstraikh  is  a  doctoral  student  at  St.  Antony's College,  Oxford.  1 lc  specialises  in  the 
socio-linguislic problems  of Yiddish.  His  native city  is  Zaporizhzhya  in  Ukraine.
1  The  statistical  data  quoted  in  this  article  arc  gleaned  from:  Pcrcpis'  Kieva  16  marta  1919 
goda,  part  1,  Kyiv,  1920;  Alfarbandishe  baratung  fun  di  yidishe  scklsyes  fun  al.  k.  p.  (b), 
Moscow,  1927;  Pidsumky  partperepysu  1927  roku,-  Kharkiv,  1928;  Y.  Veytsblit,  "Di  mutcr- 
shprakh  ba  di  yidishe  proletaryer  in  Ukraine”,  in  Der  shlcrn,  3  April,  Kharkiv,  1930;  Y.  Veytsblit, 
Di  dinamik  fun  der  yidisher  bafclkcrung  in  Ukraine  far  di  yorn  1897-1926,  Kharkiv,  1930;  Y. 
Kantor,  Natsional'noc  stroitcl'slvo  sredi  evreev,  Moscow,  1931;  Y.  Leshchinsky,  Dos  sovetishe 
yidntum,  New  York,  1911;  G.O.  Liber,  Soviet  Nationality  Policy,  Urban  Growth  and  Identity 
Change  in  the  Ukrainian SSH,  1932-1931,  Cambridge,  1992.

HISTORY
41
of  Ukraine  claimed  Yiddish  as  their  mother  tongue,  whereas  in  the  agrarian 
districts  more  than  a  half of them  identified Yiddish  as  their first language.
Yiddish  retained  its  strongholds  among  the  sedentary  population  of  the 
Kam ianets  (97% ),  Shepetivka  (96% ),  Proskuriv  (96% ),  Tulchyn  (96% ), 
Berdychiv  (95%),  Vinnytsia  (95%),  Uman  (95%),  Bila  Tserkva  (92%),  and  a  few 
other  districts  which  had  been  the  heartland  of  Ukrainian  Jewry  for  genera­
tions.  Although  now,  among  these  linguistically  retentive Jews  there  began  a 
mass  flight  from  the  backwaters  to  the  urban  melting-pots,  since  their  shtet- 
lach
  could  not  recover  from  the  devastation  and  pogroms  of  the  Civil  War 
period.  In  addition,  the  shtetl,  “an  ugly  unit  of the  capitalist  system”,  became, 
in  the  1920s,  the  target  of “the  most ruthless  blows  of the  Revolution”.2
The  following  statistics  give  some  notion  about  the  language  behaviour  of 
Ukraine’s Jews  in  the  1920s.
Retention of Yiddish among Ukrainian Jews,  1920s
Year
Census
%  of Jews  claiming 
Yiddish  as  their 
mother-tongue
1926
General  census  of  the  population
75.6
1926
All  trade-union  members’  census
58.5
1927
All  Communist  Party  members’  census 
39.4
1929
All  trade-union  members’  census
42.5
Rapid  language  assimilation  in  big  urban  centres  was  not  a  new  phenom­
enon.  However,  the  post-Revolutionary  Jewish  urbanite  was  much  more 
assimilation-prone.  First  o f  all,  the  proportion  of Jewish  urbanites  to  the 
general  urban  population  fell  by  half  during  the  inter-census  period  1897- 
1926  due  to  an  even  more  rapid  influx  of non-Jewish  migrants.  As  a  result, 
in  a  Soviet  city  the  Russian  and  Ukrainian  languages  could  easier  “drown” 
Yiddish.  Especially  as  any  ethnically  organised  public  activities  were  official­
ly  viewed  suspicious.  To  name  but  one  example:  in  1922,  a  circular  of  the 
Ukrainian  Komsomol’s  Central  Committee  banned  all  private  sport  clubs 
with  exclusively Jew ish   membership.3
2  A.  Bragin,  M.  Kol'tsov,  Sud'ba  evreyskikh  mass  v  Sovetskom Soyuze,  Moscow,  1924,  p.  5-6.
5 G.  Estraikh,  "Neskol'ko neizvestnykh tsitat”,  in Evreyskayagazela,  No.  5 (March) Moscow,  1992.

4 2
THE UKRAINIAN REVIEW
On  the  other  hand,  occupational  acculturation  began  to  be  far  more 
widespread  in  the  post-1917  years.  In  1922,  Lenin  lamented,  “We  have  in 
Ukraine  too  many  Jews.  It  is  the  genuine  Ukrainian  workers  and  peasants 
w ho  should  be  involved  in  governing”.4  However,  this  pronouncem ent 
referred  mainly  to  certain  key  executive  posts.  Jews,  the  most  literate  and 
urbanised  ethnic  group  of  the  Republic,  remained  prominent  among  office 
workers  and  professionals.  Less  than  50%  o f Jew ish  trade-unionists  with 
such  work  status  retained Yiddish  as  their  mother tongue.
Retention of Yiddish in different age brackets,  1926
 
(% of the whole Jewish population)
Age
In  urban  centres 
above  50,000
with  population 
under  50,000
in  villages
Total
0-4
49.23
81.49
93.71
71.89
5-9
43.49
80.13
94.28
69.89
10-14
47.78
81.26
94.30
72.65
15-19
49.87
80.79
94.13
71.63
20-24
49.85
80.90
93.22
69.55
25-29
53.88
82.58
92.99
70.99
30-34
59.02
85.25
93.95
73.51
35-39
64.32
87.50
95.29
81.94
40-44
63.81
89.75
90.55
81.94
45-49
74.07
91.34
96.52
85.32
50-54
77.5 6
92.96
97.03
87.76
In  contrast  to  them,  Yiddish  retention  was  very  high  (about  80%)  among, 
say,  Jew ish  tailors  and  sempstresses  who  constituted  the  vast  majority 
(above  70%)  of  the  clothing  industry  workers.  In  this  industry,  some  o f  the 
trade-union  organisation  conducted  their  activity  only  in  Yiddish.  A  charac­
teristic  example  was  the  Tinyakov  clothing  factory  (in  Kharkiv)  where  there 
was  a  special  Yiddish  newspaper  “Shtolene  nodi”  (Steel  Needle)  with  a 
readership  o f some  1,500.
Even  at  the  height  o f the  indigenisation  drive  (which  was  generally  bene­
ficial  to  Yiddish  activity5),  the  linguistic  assimilation  of Ukrainian Jews  meant 
for  the  most  part  Russification  rather  than  Ukrainisation.  In  1926,  fewer  than 
one  per  cent Jews  claimed  Ukrainian  as  their  first  language.  Even  the  inci­
4  Ibid.  See  also  G.  Estraikh,  "Letters  to  the  Editor”,  in  East  European Jewish  Affairs,  Vol.  23, 
No.  1,  1993,  p.  123.
5  M.  Altshuler,  "Ukrainian-Jewish  Relations  in  the  Soviet  Milieu  in  the  Interwar  Period”,  in  H. 
Aster  and  P.J.  Potichnyj  (eds.),  Ukrainian-Jewish Relations  in H istorical Perspective,  Edmonton, 
1990,  p.  296-8.

HISTORY
4 3
dence  of Ukrainian  literacy  was  not  very  substantial  —   240,000  as  opposed 
to  the  935,000  Jews  who  were  literate  in  Russian.  However,  these  figures 
might  be  welcomed  as  a  fundamental  change.  (In  1919,  a  census  of  the 
population  of Kyiv  found  that  among  89,500  literate Jew s  only  1.4%  claimed 
to  be  literate  in  Ukrainian;  the  majority —   95%  of the Jewish  respondents  of 
1919  —   answered  that  they  could  read  and  write  in  Russian,  68%  —   in  the 
“Jewish  language”,  and  1.7% —   in  Polish.6)  Outside  the  rural  areas  the  social 
basis  for  Ukrainisation  was  quite  thin  even  among  the  Ukrainians,7  let  alone 
other ethnic groups.
The  Yiddish  word-stock  p e r  se  furnishes  evidence  of  the  roles  which 
Russian  and  Ukrainian  played  in  the  Jewish  society.  It  was  Russian  offi­
cialese  and  journalese  that  fed  the  vocabulary  of Soviet Yiddish  publications. 
True,  some  outdated  caiques  and  loan-words  from  the  Soviet  Ukrainian 
Newspeak  can  be  recognised,  but  their number  is  very  limited;  e.g.
Y.  d orfh oy z sil'bu d(yn ok) [village  club-house],
Y.  k o m n ez a m  k o m n ez a m  (committee  of impoverished  peasants],
Y.  orem p oy er n ez a m o z h n ik  (poor  peasant],
Y.  spilke spilka (union].
C ertainly,  this  b rief  list  could  be  exp an d ed .  H ow ever,  the  Soviet 
Ukrainianisms  become  lost  on  the  fringes  of  the  Soviet  Yiddish  vocabulary 
among  thou san ds of borrowings  from  Russian.
It  is  known  that  as  far back  as  the  second  half of the  19th  century,  words  of 
Russian  origin  had  become  predominant  in  the  Slavonic  component  of literary 
Yiddish.  The  impact  of  Ukrainian  was  especially  weak  in  the  vocabulary  of 
administration  and  modern  city  life.8 9 After  the  Revolution,  this  impact  could 
increase  only  very  slightly.  In  spite  of  official  lip-service  to  the  languages  of 
the  Soviet  Republics,  it  was  Russian  that  became  d e fa c t o   the  supra-language 
of the  new  regime  and  its  elite.  Therefore,  both  Yiddish  and  Ukrainian  found 
themselves,  in  a  sense,  in  the  same  position  —   they  become  targets  of Soviet 
Russian  lexical  infusions.  But  that  is  only  half the  story.
By  denationalising  Jewish  life,  the  Soviet  milieu  deprived  Yiddish,  to  a 
considerable  degree,  of  its  creative  capacity.  Abraham  Koralnik,  a  Jewish 
essayist,  wrote,  “Language,  national  culture!  But...  for  us,  for  Jews,  it’s  not 
enough.  That  is  sufficient  for  Letts,  Poles,  Ukrainians.  [...]  Jew s  need  a 
chimera”.?
6
  In  1910-1911,  Ukrainian  practically  did  not  figure  in  the  language  repertoire  of Jewish  stu­
dents  in  the  Kyiv  higher  schools  (cf.  G.  Estraikh,  “Languages  of Yehupets  Students",  in  East 
E uropean Jew ish Affairs,
  vol.  22,  No.  1,  London,  1992,  p.  63-71.
7  G.Y.  Shevelov,  The  U krainian  Language  in  the First H a lf o f  the  Twentieth  Century  (1900- 
1941),
  Cambridge,  1989,  p.  122.
8  V.  Swoboda,  “Ukrainianisms  in  J.M.  Lifsic's  Judes-rusyser  vertes-bix”,  in  P.  Wexler  (ed.). 
Studies in  Yiddish Linguistics,
  Tubingen,  1990,  p.  109.
9
 A.D.  Karal'nik,  "Evreyskaya  problema  vlasti”,  in  Novyyput',  No.  32,  Moscow,  1917,  p.  10.

4 4
THE  UKRAINIAN  REVIEW
But  in  the  Communists’  hands  Yiddish  language  and  culture  became  a 
Soviet  indoctrination  tool,  rather  than  a  “chimera”.  The  Jewish  Communists 
Sections’  Central  Bureau  reported  in  1922,  during  the  First  All-  Ukrainian 
Congress  of Jewish  culture  activists,
Some of the activists did not have a  dear enough notion about the meaning of the 
Communist activity  among  the Jews.  They  have  attached a  particular value to the  lan­
guage  question.  The  members  of the  Central  Bureau  have  managed  to  straighten  the 
line based on principle and to rally the delegates round the resolution which attracted 
attention exdusively to the intrinsic value of the activity,  viz.  its Communist content.10
The  introduction  of what  was  called  “international”  terminology  was  one 
of  the  most  favourable  “anti-chimerical”  devices  of  Soviet  language  regula­
tors.  In  point  of  fact,  both  Ukrainian  and  Yiddish  w ere  o b lig ed   to  emulate 
the  shape  of Russian  coinages  with  international  (Latin,  Greek,  etc.)  roots  or 
affixes.11  At  the  same  time,  the  aftereffects  of this  policy  were  essentially  dif­
ferent.  For  Ukrainian;  such  an  approach  spelled  an  overt  swing  towards 
Russian,  whereas  for  Soviet  Yiddish  language-planners  it  provided  a  unique 
chance  to  steer  a  middle  course  among  the  co-territorial  Slavonic  languages 
—   Ukrainian,  Belarusian,  and  Russian.  Thus,  such  caiques  as  "kolvirt" [col­
lective  farm]  or  "dorfrat"  [village  Soviet]  appeared  to  be  a  compromise  set­
tlement:  neither  did  "kolkhoz"/"sel'sovet"  (Russian)  nor  "kolhosp‘/"sil'rada" 
(Ukrainian)  nor  "kolcbaz7"sielsaviet"  (Belarusian).  Moreover,  the  “interna­
tional”  disguise  levelled  many  lexical  items,  especially  different  abbrevia­
tions,  e.g.  "partorg"  (Party  organiser),  "revkom"  (revolutionary  committee), 
etc.  It  is  no  coincidence  that  the  All-Ukrainian  conference  on  the  Yiddish 
language  would  later,  in  1934,  go  so  far  as  to  make  "international"  word-for­
mation  the  principle.12  Often,  however,  these  “international  words”  repre­
sented  (as  opposed  to  “regular”  Russian)  a  distinction  without  a  difference, 
because  the  real  source  of  almost  all  Sovietisms,  including  coinage  with 
international  constituents,  was  Russian.
In  summary,  both  the  language-related  statistical  data  and  the  vocabulary 
o f Soviet  Yiddish  are  indicative  of  the  real  status  allotted  to  Ukrainian  even 
in  the  heyday  of indigenisation.  The  Ukrainian Jews  as  well  as  Yiddish  grav­
itated  chiefly  to  the  Soviet supra-language,  viz.  Russian. 

The  a u t h o r   w ish es  to  th a n k   th e  R ich  F o u n d a tio n   a n d   th e   M em o r ia l
 
F ou n d ation  f o r  Jew ish  Culture f o r  aw ardin g the sch olarship w h ich  fa c ilita te d
 
this study.
10  Rossiyskiy  Tsentr  Khraneniya  i  Isucheniya  Dokumentov  Noveyshey  Istorii,  fond  17,  opis' 
60,  delo 974,  list  30.
11  Cf.  P.  Wexler,  Purism  a n d   Language:  A  Study  in  M odem   U krainian  a n d   Belorussian 
N ationalism  (1840-1907),
  Bloomington,  1974,  p.  162.
12 Afn shprakbjront,  No.  3-4,  Kyiv,  1935,  p.  267.
1   ...   23   24   25   26   27   28   29   30   ...   44




Ma'lumotlar bazasi mualliflik huquqi bilan himoyalangan ©fayllar.org 2020
ma'muriyatiga murojaat qiling