Editorial board slava stetsko


Power: “All  the king’s men”


Download 16.82 Mb.
Pdf ko'rish
bet35/44
Sana15.12.2019
Hajmi16.82 Mb.
1   ...   31   32   33   34   35   36   37   38   ...   44

Power: “All  the king’s men”
In  the  consciousness  of  the  masses  there  lives  a  fairly  primitive  (and 
hence  extremely  viable)  stereotype,  which  has  grown  up  in  the  conditions 
of post-totalitarian  reality:  that  “democracy”  equals  disorder,  econom ic  chaos 
and  political  impotence.  This  implies,  of  course,  that  for  the  past  2-3  years 
Ukraine  has  been  living  in  conditions  of  democracy  and  a  new,  democratic 
order.  This  stereotype  is  nourished  by  another,  the  special  “n o  p a sa ra n !"  of 
real  democrats  who  constantly  issue  warnings  about  the  possibility  of  the 
Communists  returning  to  power.  But  in  reality,  this  stereotype  has  little  in 
common  with  the  facts  of  the  situation.  The  Communists  never  lost  real 
power,  so  there  is  no  sense  in  talking  about  the  existence  of democracy.
It  is  obvious  that  in  the  past  4-5  years  a  second  echelon  o f  the  party 
n o m en k la tu ra
  came  to  power  in  Ukraine,  replacing  the  Communist  top 
brass  discredited  by  the  failed  Moscow  coup  o f  August  1991-  There  has 
been  no  qualitative  change  in  the  powers-that-be,  they  have  simply  adapted 
to  new  circumstances.  The  most  obvious  example  of  this  is  the  figure  of 
President  Leonid  Kravchuk  himself.  In  the  past  he  was  the  ideological  secre-
Dr.  Heorhii  K asian ov  is  a   Senior Research  Fellow  at  the  Institute  o f  U krainian History o f  the
 
A cadem y o f  Sciences o f  Ukraine. He is the a u th o r o ffo u r  m onographs.

4
THE  UKRAINIAN REVIEW
tary  of the  Central  Committee  of the  Communist  Party  o f Ukraine.  Under  the 
conditions  of  Gorbachev’s  "démocratisation”  drive,  his  post  necessitated 
communication  with  the  opposition,  which  gave  him  invaluable  information 
and  the  chance  of  switching  sides  at  the  right  moment.  He  took  on  board 
the  ideas  which  the  opposition  propounded,  including  their  principal  tenet
—   the  idea  of  an  independent  Ukrainian  state.  Kravchuk  was  supported  by 
that  section  o f  the  party  n o m e n k la tu r a   in  place,  w h ich .also  saw  their 
chance  and  believed  that  Kravchuk  as  president  of  an  independent  state 
would  do  more  for  them  than  as  First  Secretary  of the  Central  Committee.
Leonid  Kravchuk  and  his  “king’s  men”  came  to  power  by  making  use  of 
the  fall  of  their  superiors,  the  ideas  of  the  national-democrats  and  national­
ists  and  the  growth  of decentralising  tendencies  in  the  USSR.
This  new  edition  of  “national-Communism”,  which  is  without  any  moral 
content,  is  explained  by  essentially  rational  motives  and  reasons,  the  striving 
of  a  certain  section  of  the  n om en klatu ra  to  preserve  and  expand  the  only 
extremely  valuable  possession  it  had  —   power.  The  paradox  lies  not  in  the 
lightning  evolution  of  the  Communists  into  nationalists  (in  the  best  sense  of 
the  latter  term).  The  paradox  lies  in  that  the  national-neophytes  from  the  party 
offices  were  of  their  very  nature  simply  incapable  of  making  use  of  power 
even  to  strengthen  their  position.  The  structure  o f power  and  its  component 
parts  and  carriers  remained  as  of old,  but  the  tasks  which  faced  and  continue 
to  face  this  power-system  are  new.  Moreover,  one  must  not  forget  that  the 
selection  of  the  n o m en k la tu ra   in  Ukraine  was  based  on  training  cadres, 
essentially  to  carry  out  orders  and  directives  from  the  centre.  As  a  result  the 
present-day  power  structures  consist  essentially  of  “bureaucratic  robots”  who 
are  simply  incapable  of  producing  and  implementing  qualitatively  new  ideas 
(as  already stated,  even  to  preserve  their  power  alien  slogans  had  to  be  used, 
against which  in  their  time  this  bureaucracy  had waged  an  implacable  war).
The  result was  a  singular stupor  of the  authorities,  their progressive  degener­
ation  and growing  imbalance  of their structures.  On  the surface  this  has become 
apparent  in  what  is  termed  the  conflict  between  the  “branches  of  power”,  the 
decentralisation  of power structures,  and  an  unprecedented  scale  of corruption. 
Vertical  structures  of power  used  to  work  on  the  principle:  Central  Committee
—   provincial  committee —   district  committee —   local  committee.  After  the  col­
lapse  of this  system  the  place  of the  party  committees  was  taken  by  councils  of 
people’s  deputies,  which  were  simultaneously  (essentially  formally)  horizontal 
power  structures.  In  the  conditions  of single-party  centralism  the  councils  had 
always  played  a  secondary  role  —   basically  carrying  out  orders.  Thus,  in  the 
new  conditions  they  likewise  appeared  capable  only  of  maintaining  the  status 
quo.  Attempts  by  the  President  to  repair  the  activities  of  the  vertical  power 
structures  through  the  institution of representatives and administrations  had only 
the  slightest  effect,  and  moreover  met  with  opposition  from  the  councils.  The 
result  was  that  the  power  structures  were  paralysed,  and  the  decisions  of  the 
centre  sabotaged  and  ignored  at  the  local  level.  The  powers  that  be  are  inca­
pable  of reforming  themselves  even  in the  interests  of self-preservation.

CURRENT AFFAIRS
5
In  these  conditions  the  power  vacuum  is  filled  by  provincial  and  district 
structures.  This  is  where  the  real  power  is  concentrated.  At  the  level  of  the 
provinces  and  districts  function  strange  mutual  interest  groups  (which  the 
people  for  a  long  time  now  have  been  calling  the  mafia),  which  include  key 
figures  from  the  local  councils,  the  militia,  procurator’s  offices,  the  corps  of 
directors,  trade  middlemen,  people  from  the  cooperatives,  collective  farm 
heads,  and  so  on.  These  mutual  interest  groups  operate  at  present  on  the 
principle  of self-preservation  and  all  possess  the  means  of manipulating  mate­
rial  values,  which  in  today’s  conditions  means  manipulating  power.  They  all 
play  a  major,  if  not  decisive,  behind-the-scenes  role  in  the  elections.  They 
have  long  since  now  established  an  organised  lobby  in  Parliament  and  they 
have  real  opportunities  to  preserve  and  even  strengthen  their  own  positions. 
With  them  holding  such  positions  any  president  and  any  government  with  the 
most  progressive  programmes  will  have  unbelievable  difficulties  in  bringing 
about  reform.  To  deprive  such  groups  of the  opportunity  of really  influencing 
socio-political  life  requires  a  substantial  reform  of  the  authorities,  a  new  elec­
toral  law,  and  a  new  Constitution.  As  events  in  Russia  have  shown,  there  are 
those  in  that  country  who  are  incapable  of handing  over  power  by  peaceful, 
constitutional  means.  Will  Ukraine  find  her own  Yeltsin?
The  problem of individuals  in light of the elections
The  two-year  tenure  of Leonid  Kravchuk  as  President  has  demonstrated,  it 
seems,  three  fundamental  characteristics  of  this  politician:  his  fantastic  abili­
ties  to  manoeuvre,  a  no  less  remarkable  adherence  to  an  undetermined 
position  and  a  lack  of political  will  on  decisive  moments  in  the  development 
of events.  Kravchuk  had  several  favourable  moments  for starting  the  process 
of  reform:  after  the  independence  referendum  of December  1991,  using  the 
raising  of  public  consciousness  and  the  results  of  the  presidential  election, 
he  could  have  exploited  the  situation  and  taken  the  initiative  in  introducing 
a  package  of  radical  economic  and  political  changes;  second  —   during  the 
crisis  of the  Fokin  government  (summer-autumn  1992);  third —   after  the  dis­
crediting  o f  the  Pynzenyk  reforms  (autumn  1993).  In  the  first  instance 
Kravchuk  simply  was  not  ready  morally  and  organisationally,  in  the  others 
—   he  had  insufficient  political  will  and  was  let  down  by  the  tactics  of  bal­
ancing  between  the  “party  in  power”  and  the  “opposition”.  One  has  the 
impression  that  the  era  of Kravchuk-type  politicians  is  over.
The  problem  here  is  not  simply  of  Kravchuk’s  personality.  To  a  far  greater 
extent  it  is  bound  up  in  the  lack  of real  choices.  The  circle  of individuals,  who 
hypothetically  could  compete  against  the  current  President,  is  very  narrow, 
which  is  a  programme  for  confusing  the electorate  and  a  corresponding  passivi­
ty  of the  voters,  and  which  increases  the  danger of someone  getting elected  by 
accident.  Possible  contenders  in  the  presidential  elections  may  be  Vyacheslav 
Chornovil  (Rukh),  Leonid  Kuchma  (backed  by  the  industrial  sector  of southern 
and  eastern  Ukraine),  Ivan  Plyushch  (collective  farm -directors’  lobby),

6
THE  UKRAINIAN  REVIEW
Volodymyr  I Iryniov  (“new  wave”  businessmen  and  New  Ukraine),  and  Ihor 
Yukhnovskyi  (backed  by  a  certain  section  of businessmen  and  technocrats).  Of 
course,  other  candidates  may  well  emerge,  but  their  range  of variation  will  once 
again  be  limited to  circles  close  to  Lhc existing  power structures.
Moreover,  choice  is  limited  by  the  fact  that  the  majority  o f  presidential 
candidates  will  undoubtedly  have  very  similar  platforms.  Hence  the  choice 
will  lie  not  so  much  between  what  the  candidates  offer,  as  their  personali­
ties.  In  such  a  situation  the  candidate  who  can  rely  on  an  existing  power 
structure  has  the  better  chance  and  far  wider  opportunities  for  publicity 
which  once  again  raises  the  rating  of the  “party  in  power”.
It  is  worth  noting  another  characteristic  of the  Ukrainian  electorate  which 
became  manifest  during  the  last  elections  in  1990.  It  may  be  easily  observed 
that  among  a  significant  proportion  of  the  voters  political  figures  arc  espe­
cially  popular  where  personal  characteristics  can  be  summed  up  in  the  term 
“substantial”.  Thus,  during  the  last  presidential  elections  1991,  Chornovil, 
thin,  quick-moving,  lively,  sarcastic,  and  sometimes  with  a  note  of  hysteria 
was  destined  for  defeat  in  comparison  with  the  well-fed,  unhurrying,  ever 
placid,  well-dressed  Kravchuk.  Apart  from  this,  greater success  will  go  to  the 
candidate  who  bases  his  campaign  on  populist  slogans,  and  not  in  the  last 
resort  —   on  the  mood  of  levelling-down  which  has  grown  considerably  due 
to  the  impoverishment  of  a  significant  section  of  the  population  and  the 
rapid  polarisation  of standards  of living.
Hence  these  presidential  elections  arc  merely  the  second  act  of the  politi­
cal  tragicomedy  which  the  “parliament”  of  Ukraine,  in  deciding  on  new 
elections,  is  presenting  to  the  world  audience.  The  first  act  will  be  the  elec­
tions  to  the  Supreme  Council,  where  the  main  rivalry  will  be  between  politi­
cal  parties.  There  is  no  doubt  that  the  outcome  of the  presidential  elections 
will  be  largely  determined  at  this  stage.
Political  parties
The  number  of  political  parlies  which  are  officially  registered  by  the  slate 
organs  of  Ukraine  now  totals  about  thirty.  At  least  two-thirds  of these  parlies 
have  no  perceptible  influence  in  political  life.  The  majority  of them  function 
only  at  a  regional  level.  Their  material  resources  are  meagre,  membership 
sometimes  does  not  exceed  one  hundred,  and  they  have  no  printed  organs.
Thus  the  real  struggle  will  lie  among  some  ten  parlies  and  political 
groups.  The  course  of the  contest  will  depend  to  a  large  degree  on  the  type 
of  electoral  system  which  will  determine  whether  these  parties  form  elec­
toral  blocs  or  whether,  on  the  contrary,  their  rivalry  becomes  sharper.
The  political  spectrum,  exhibited  by  the  current  parties  and  citizens’  asso­
cia tio n s  o f  U kraine  is  fairly  b road   —   from  o rth o d o x   C om m unists 
(Communist  Party  of  Ukraine)  and  “moderate”  Communists  (Socialist  Parly)
"^tionalisls  (moderate —   the  Congress  of Ukrainian  Nationalists,  and  ultra 
—   the  Ukrainian  National  Assembly  and  the  micro-formations  of  the  type  of

CURRENT AFFAIRS
7
the  Social-National  Parly).  Between  these  poles  lie  the  parties  of  a  national- 
dem ocratic  orientation  (D em ocratic  Party  o f  Ukraine,  Rukh,  Ukrainian 
Republican  Party,  etc.),  and  the  ecological  movement  (the  “Green”  Party).
In  the  fight  for  a  place  in  the  new  Supreme  Council  the  main  problem  for 
the  parties  will  be  to  develop  a  clear-cut  platform  with  the  emphases  on 
socio-economic  questions.  Parties  which  adopt  as  their basic  line  the  strength­
ening  of  stale  sovereignly  will  have  little  chance  of  success.  It  should  be 
observed  that  here  the  problem  is  not  one  of defining  the  range  o f socio-eco­
nomic  questions  and  offering  solutions  for  them,  but  of having  in  their  plat­
forms  salient  features  which  differ  from  the  platforms  of  other  parties, 'and 
making  them  comprehensible  to  the  voters.  In  a  situation  when  a  consider­
able  number  of electoral  platforms  will  be  similar,  the  advantages  will  all  be 
on  the  side  of  those  parties  which  offer  simple  and  speedy  solutions  to  diffi­
cult  problems.  Support  is  also  likely  to  increase  for  parties  which  advocate 
state-protectionist  social  principles,  first  and  foremost  the  Socialist  Party, 
which  is  making  the  greatest  play with  the  ideas  of social  security  for the  pop­
ulation,  and  demonstrating  notable  examples  of political  demagogy.
No  less  difficult  for  the  various  parties  is  the  problem  of  putting  their  pro­
grammes  over  to  the  public  in  the  face  of  a  growing  indifference  to  politics 
among  the  majority  of the  population  of Ukraine.  As  numerous  public  opinion 
polls  have  shown,  a  considerable  number  of voters  base  their views  not  on  the 
platform  of the  party,  but  on  its  name  and  its  leader.  The  following  semi-anec- 
dolal  incident  is  revealing  here:  in June  1993  in  a  public  opinion  poll,  carried 
out  by  the  “Democratic  initiatives”  centre,  the  “Party  of  Order  and  Justice” 
picked  up  a  fairly  large  percentage  of popular  support,  beating  the  Ukrainian 
Republican  Party,  the  Socialist  Party,  the  Party  for  the  Democratic  Rebirth  of 
Ukraine,  and  several  others.  Yet  the  “Party  of Order  and Justice”  did  not  exist 
at all —  but  had simply  been  invented  for  the  occasion  by  the  pollsters.
Assessing  the  party  orientation  of  the  population  in  general,  it  becomes 
noticeable  that  at  present  it  is  the  national-democratic  groups  which  enjoy 
the  greatest  popularity,  first  and  foremost  due  to  the  merger  of national-state 
and  democratic  postulates  in  their  platforms.  However,  one  cannot  rely  on 
this  “credit  of confidence”  being  infinite.  It  is  simply  a  symptom  o f the  iner­
tia  of  processes  connected  with  the  downfall  of  the  Communist  Party  and 
the  emergence  of  Ukraine  into  the  ranks  of  independent  states.  Without  a 
constructive  socio-economic  platform  it  will  be  difficult  to  hold  this  position. 
Unfortunately,  the  national-democrats  and  their  allies  have  shown  little  sign 
of  being  able  to  develop  such  a  platform  —   and  their  opponents  from  the 
camp  of the  left exploit  this  fact.  The  electoral  campaign  frequently becomes 
simply  an  attempt  to  blacken  the  image  of  the  Communists  (demands  for 
the  Communist  Party  to  be  put  on  trial,  commemoration  of the  60th  anniver­
sary  o f the  famine,  etc.)  at  the  time  when  in  any  case  this  image  —   in  public 
opinion  generally —   is  extremely  repugnant.
At  the  present  moment,  according  to  the  sociological  observations  of  the 
Institute  of  Strategic  Studies  (in  Ukraine),  the  most  popular  parties  are  the

10
THE  UKRAINIAN  REVIEW
economics  and  politics:  political  decisions  are  often  taken  without  regard  for 
economic  realities  and  which  accordingly  deteriorate  even  further.
Quite  naturally  parasitic  economic  structures  flourish  in  these  conditions 
o f  econom ic  crisis.  Middleman  firms,  the  bureaucracy  of  the  econom ic- 
administrative  structures,  and  racketeers  get  rich  at  fantastic  speeds.  The 
production  sector  of  the  economy  is  declining  and  the  fiscal  policy  of  suc­
cessive  governments  has  hastened  this  decline.  This  has  its  own  social  con­
sequences,  particularly  in  the  sphere  of the  division  of  labour:  the  cream  of 
the  work-force  and  intellectuals  are  drifting  into  the  non-productive  spheres. 
A  whole  social  class  of  “get-rich-quickies”  is  growing  up,  set  on  putting  its 
fairly  large  capital  not  into  increasing  productivity  or  even  the  middleman 
network  (for  which  there  simply  are  no  conditions  in  today’s  Ukraine),  but 
into  luxury  goods,  real  estate,  or  simply  converts  it  into  stable  currency  in 
Western  banks.  This  leads  to  a  necrosis  of  the  capital  which  should  be 
employed  to  establish  market  relations  in  Ukraine.  The  private  sector,  which 
would  be  narrow  and  deformed  even  without  this  trend,  is  thus  acquiring 
even  more  deformities  and  lives  for  today,  with  no  thought  for  the  future. 
This  creates  built-in  difficulties  of implementing  market  reforms  and  accord­
ingly  poses  a  threat  to  the  democratic  order  in  Ukraine  for  the  future.
In  general  the  social  consequences  of  this  lack  of  reform  activity  on  the 
part  of  the  authorities  are  ruinous.  In  September  1993,  for  example,  70%  of 
those  polled  in  Kyiv stated  that  they  live  below  the  officially  established  “aver­
age”  level  of consumption,  and  this  can  be  extrapolated  to  the  whole  popula­
tion  of Ukraine.  It  is  pensioners,  employees  of state  enterprises,  and  the  intel­
ligentsia  who  suffer  the  most  from  the  collapse  of the  economy.  A  lumpenisa- 
tion  of entire  social  strata  is  taking  place  with  the  simultaneous  appearance  of 
a  small  stratum  of people  quite  wealthy  even  by  Western  standards.  What  we 
may  conveniently  term  the  “middle  class”  (which  would  in  any  case  be  micro­
scopic)  is  being  catastrophically  reduced  even  further.  The  structure  of society 
is  being  destabilised.  One  cannot  avoid  noting  also  the  demographic  conse­
quences:  for  the  third  year  the  death  rate  in  Ukraine  exceeds  the  birth  rate, 
and  there  is  a  sharp  rise  in  the  number  of divorces,  which  means  the  destruc­
tion  of the  fundamental  unit  of society —  the  family.
Looking  at  these  problems  through  the  prism  of the  elections,  it  becomes 
utterly  obvious  that  the  majority  of  voters  will  be  drawn  towards  those 
politicians  and  parties  which  promise  first  and  foremost  socio-economic  sta­
bility.  Understandably,  people  of all  political  views  will  do  that,  but  it  is  the 
politicians  of  the  socialist-Communist  camp,  who  traditionally  base  their 
support  on  the  socially  depressed  classes,  who  stand  to  gain  the  most.  And 
the  weighting  of the  said  classes  in  Ukraine  is  steadily  growing.
Ukraine  in  the  run-up  to  the  elections  faces  a  difficult  package  of socio­
economic,  political,  cultural  and  moral  problems.  The  choice  will  favour 
whoever  can  offer  the  best  solution.  And  this  is  a  matter  for  the  political  far­
sightedness  of  politicians,  their  ability  to  adjust  to  a  rapidly  changing  situa­
tion,  and  finally  their  organisational  skills.  The  future  depends  on  us? 


11
ON  FOREIGN  INVESTMENTS  IN  UKRAINE
Viktor Mouraviov
The  legal  framework  for  economic  activities  of foreign  nationals  and  legal 
persons  in  Ukraine  including  those  in  the  field  of foreign  investments  is  pro­
vided  by  a  number  of legal  instruments.  These  include  laws  and  resolutions 
of  the  Supreme  Council  of  Ukraine,  decrees  adopted  both  by  the  President 
of Ukraine  and  the  Council  of Ministers  of Ukraine;  the  rules  established  by 
the  National  Bank  of  Ukraine  and  international  agreem ents  to  which 
Ukraine  is  a  party,  which  are  in  force  on  the  territory  of Ukraine.  The  most 
important  of  these  documents  (more  than  50  in  all)  came  into  force  at  the 
beginning  o f  the  1990s  and  to  a  considerable  extent  are  linked  to  the 
process  of legal  reforms  in  the  country  and  the  consolidation  of her  interna­
tional  status.
Foreign investments
The  fundamental  act  regarding  foreign  investments  which  is  currently  in force 
in  Ukraine  is  the  Decree  of  the  Cabinet  of Ministers  “On  the  Rules  for  Foreign 
Investments”,  which  was  drafted in  close  cooperation with Western  experts.
This  decree  took  effect  from  20  May  1993.1  It  reorganised  the  whole 
mechanism  of  legal  regulation  in  the  field,  reducing  the  volume  of  the  rele­
vant  legislation.  For  once  it  came  into  force  any  legal  instrument  issued  prior 
to  it  remained  valid  only  if  it  did  not  contradict  the  provisions  of  the  new 
decree  and  only  insofar as  it  referred  to  matters  not  dealt  with  by  the  latter.
The  enactment  of  the  decree  abrogated  the  Law  on  Foreign  Investments 
passed  by  the  Supreme  Council  of  Ukraine  only  one  year  earlier.2  At  the 
time,  this  law  had  been  considered  by  many  scholars  and  businessmen  as  a 
new  step  forward  towards  modernising  and  liberalising  the  then-existing 
rules  on  foreign  investments,  since  it  tried  to  meet  the  demands  of  foreign 
investors  as  much  as  possible.  So  its  abrogation  was  not  universally  wel­
come,  particularly  since  the  decree  repealed,  inter alia,  Art.  9  of  the  previ­
ous  Law  which  stated  that  “the  legislation  in  effect  at  the  time  o f registration 
o f  the  foreign  investment  shall  continue  to  apply  to  the  investment  for  a
Viktor Mouraviov,  a  lawyer,  holds  a  doctorate  in  law  from  Kyiv  University.  He  is  an  Assistant 
Professor  at  Kyiv  University's  Ukrainian  Institute  of International  Relations.
1  Decree  on  the  Regime  of  Foreign  Investments,  20  May  1993,  in  Holos  Ukrayiny,  12  June 
1993.
2  Law  on  Foreign  Investments,  11  March  1992,  in  Russia  a n d  Comm onwealth  Business Law 
Report,
  vol.  3,  no.  3  (19921.

12
THE UKRAINIAN  REVIEW
period  o f  10  years”.  Thus,  the  decree  has  encroached  on  the  principle  of 
legal  security  which  is  one  of  the  fundamental  conditions  for  a  favourable 
climate  for foreign  economic  activity  in  Ukraine.
However,  the  adoption  of  the  decree  was  not  simply  a  symptom  of  an 
itch  for  lawmaking  on  the  part  o f  the  Ukrainian  government.  Rather  it 
reflects  a  trend  towards  a  more  balanced  and  sober  approach  to  the  regula­
tion  of foreign  economic  activity  in  the  country.
On  the  one  hand,  the  decree  preserved  in  the  main  all  the  major  privi­
leges  for  foreign  investors.  On  the  other,  it  reflects  an  attempt  to  separate 
the  majority  of  foreign  investors  (legal  and  natural  persons)  who  are  keen 
on  long-term  and  mutually  beneficial  cooperation  with  the  Ukrainian  author­
ities,  from  those  who  have  invested  practically  nothing  (from  7  to  several 
hundred  dollars)  in  Ukraine  but  who  nevertheless  enjoy  the  existing  privi­
leges  and  guarantees  for  foreign  investors  as  a  whole  and  who  try  to  evade 
the  Ukrainian  tax  legislation.3
This  differentiation  has  been  achieved  by  introducing  the  concept  of 
“qualified  investment".  This  encom passes  foreign  intellectual  property, 
know-how,  high-tech,  sophisticated  equipment,  etc.,  and  creates  preferential 
conditions  for  transferring  them  to  Ukraine  in  comparison  with  the  other 
kinds  of foreign  investments  discussed  below.
Effective  implementation  of the  decree  is  ensured  by  the  appropriate  pro­
visions  of  the  Civil  Code,  the  Law  on  Free  Economic  Zones,  the  Law  on 
Entrepreneurship,  the  Law  on  Investment  Activity,  the  Labour  Code,  the  Law 
on  Land,  the  tax  laws,  the  legal  acts  on  currency  regulations,  etc.
The  decree  includes  a  fairly  broad  list  of  groups  of  potential  foreign 
investors  who  can  benefit  from  the  privileges  it  accords.  These  comprise 
legal  persons  established  in  accordance  with  laws  other  than  those  of 
Ukraine,  physical  persons  who  do  not  reside  permanently  on  the  territory  of 
Ukraine;  foreign  states;  international  governmental  and  non-governmental 
organisations;  other  foreign  entities  engaged  in  business  activity  and  defined 
as  such  by  Ukrainian  legislation  (Art.  1.1).  It  follows  from  the  meaning  given 
to  these  terms  that  even  those  citizens  of Ukraine  who  do  not  reside  perma­
nently  in  the  country  can  be  considered  as  foreign  investors.
The  decree  defines  foreign  investments  as  all  forms  o f  value  directly 
invested  by  foreign  investors  in  enterprises  or  other  forms  of  commercial 
activity  in  accordance  with  Ukrainian  legislation  (Art.  1.2).
Enterprises  with  foreign  investments  are  defined  by  the  decree  as  any 
legal  form  of  enterprise  established  in  compliance  with  Ukrainian  law  in 
which  during  a  given  calendar year  a  foreign  investor  has  a  qualified  foreign 
investment  as  a  share  in  the  declared  authorised  capital.
The  term  "qualified  foreign  investment”  encompasses  several  major  con­
cepts.  First  of all  any  such  investment  should  amount  to  no  less  than  20  per 3
3 See  Uryadovyi Kuryer (Kyiv),  no.  87,  12 June  1993,  p.  5.

CURRENT AFFAIRS
13
cent  of  the  declared  authorised  capital  of  the  enterprise.  At  the  same  time 
such  investment  should  be  no  less  than  US  $100,000  for  banks  and  other 
financial  institutions  and  US  $50,000  for  other enterprises  if it  takes  the  form 
of  movable  or  immovable  property  (excluding  goods  intended  for sale)  and 
any  property  rights  assigned  thereto;  any  form  of  intellectual  property  the 
hard  currency  value  of which  is  established  in  accordance  with  laws  of  the 
country  o f  the  investor  or  international  commercial  usages;  and  the  right  to 
carry  out  commercial  activities.
If a  qualified  foreign  investment  is  in  one  of the  other  forms,  mentioned  in 
the  decree,  such  as  foreign  currency,  Ukrainian  currency  in  the  case  of  rein­
vestment stocks,  bonds  and  other commercial  instruments,  monetary  claims  or 
the  right  to  claim  against the  fulfilment  of contractual  obligations  confirmed  by 
an  established  bank  and  having  a  value  in  hard  currency  etc.,  it  should  be  at 
least US  $1,000,000  for banks  and  US  $500,000  for  enterprises  (Art  1.3).
It  should  be  noted  with  respect  to  certain  provisions  of  the  decree  that 
the  inclusion  in  the  forms  of  foreign  investments  of  know-how,  patents, 
trademarks,  company  names,  author’s  rights  etc.  may  cause  some  problems 
regarding  repatriation  of capital,  due  to  possible  complications  in  the  assess­
ment  of their value  within  the  total  volume  of investment.
All  the  above  forms  of investment,  irrespective  of whether  or  not  they  are 
“qualified”,  may  be  realised  by  foreign  investors  by  means  of  ownership 
shares  in joint ventures  with  Ukrainian  legal  and  physical  persons;  the  estab­
lishment  of enterprises  wholly  owned  by  foreign  investors;  the  acquisition  of 
property;  the  acquisition  o f  land-use  rights  or  concessions  for  the  exploita­
tion  of  national  resources,  etc.  The  only  restriction  is  that  these  forms  and 
methods  of  foreign  investment  should  not  be  directly  prohibited  by  the  law 
of Ukraine  currently  in  force  (Art.  4).
The  same  applies  to  foreign  investment  in  Ukraine.  The  decree  itself does 
not  contain  any  special  provision  for  this.  It  may  be  interpreted  to  mean  that 
such  activities  may  also  include  non-commercial  ones  such  as,  e.g.,  health 
protection.  At  the  same  time  there  are  certain  areas  and  objects  in  which  the 
freedom  of  investments  is  restricted  by  other  legislative  acts  o f  Ukraine. 
Thus,  one  cannot  invest  in  projects  which  contravene  environmental  protec­
tion  standards  (Art.  51  o f  the  Law  on  the  P rotection   o f  the  Natural 
Environment),4 5  or  in  the  production  of  goods  for  which  special  licenses 
have  to  be  obtained  in  advance,  such  as  drugs,  arms,  etc.  unless  and  until 
such  a  license  is  granted (Art.  4  of the  Law  on  Entrepreneurship).5
One  of the  most  important  sections  of the  decree  is  that  dealing  with  the 
various  privileges  and  guarantees  for  foreign  investors.  Here  too  the  decree 
draws  a  distinction  between  qualified  foreign  investments  and  others.
4  Law  on  the  Protection  of  Natural  Environment,  25 June  1991,  in  United N ations E conom ic 
Comm ission f o r  Europe.
5  Law  on  Entrepreneurship,  7  February  1991,  in  Russia  a n d   Com m onwealth  Business  Law 
Report,
  vol.  2,  no.  13  [19911-

14
THE UKRAINIAN  REVIEW
According  to  Art.  31-4  of  the  decree  an  enterprise  with  qualified  foreign 
investment  shall  be  exempt  from  income  tax  for  5  years.  However,  income 
gained  from  organising  lotteries;  renting  premises  and  leasing  certain  kinds  of 
property;  auctioning  certain  kinds  of property,  gambling  houses;  video salons; 
concerts  in stadiums,  sport  palaces,  etc.  enjoy  no such  tax exemptions.
The  other  condition  governing the  aforesaid tax  privileges  states  that qualified 
foreign  investment shall  not be withdrawn  from  a joint venture  during  its  amorti­
sation  period  nor before the end of the grace  period for taxation (Art.  31.3).
One  important  practical  issue  which  has  not  yet  been  decided  is  the  point 
from  which  the  grace  period  for exemption  from  income  tax  for  an  enterprise 
with  qualified  foreign  investment  should  be  reckoned.  According  to  the 
decree  it  should  start  from  the  moment  when  qualified  foreign  investment  is 
put  in  (Art.  31.4).  On  the  other  hand  Art.  1.3  defines  an  enterprise  with  quali­
fied  foreign  investment  as  that  which  has  qualified  foreign  investment  as  a 
share  in  its  declared  authorised  capital  during  a  calendar  year.  The  question 
arises  whether  the  starting  point  for  a  grace  year  includes  that  part  of a  calen­
dar year  before  the  qualified  foreign  investment  is  put  in  or  only  the  part o f it 
thereafter.  This  clearly affects  the  fixing of the  end  of the  grace  period.
Unfortunately,  the  competent  Ukrainian  authorities  have  not  yet  given  a 
clear-cut  answer  to  this  question.
In  order  to  encourage  small  business  activity  in  Ukraine  some  special  privi­
leges  are  granted  for  small  enterprises  if  the  share  of  the  foreign  investor  in 
the  declared  authorised  capital  lies  between  US  $10,000  and  US  $50,000  (Art. 
32).  They  enjoy  the  same  tax  privileges  as  enterprises  with  qualified  foreign 
investment.  However  the  grace  period  lasts  only  one  year in  this  case.
As  far  as  other privileges  and  guarantees  envisaged  in  the  decree  are  con­
cerned,  they  are  granted  to  all  enterprises  with  foreign  investments  irrespec­
tive  o f  the  share  held  by  the  foreign  investor.  Some  exceptions  are  envis­
aged  in  the  decree  itself,  others  follow  from  other  Ukrainian  legislation  or 
from  international  agreements.  In  the  latter  case,  if  an  international  agree­
ment  in  force  in  Ukraine  embodies  rights  other  than  those  set  forth  in  the 
legislative  acts  of Ukraine  then  the  provisions  of the  said  international  agree­
ment  take  precedence.
Additional  privileges  may  be  extended  to  all  foreign  investors  in  key  sec­
tors  o f the  economic  and  social  spheres  of  Ukraine  under  government  pro­
grammes  set  up  to  attract  foreign  investors  (Art.  6,  7).  At  the  present  time 
these  include  agriculture,  metallurgy,  electronics,  mechanical  engineering, 
chemical  industry,  etc.  The  Ukrainian  government  has  expressed  its  perfect 
willingness  to  support  by  its  own  guarantees  separate  pilot-projects  within 
each  of these  sectors.
In  the  event  o f the  participation  of foreign  investors  in  large  projects  (for 
instance,  such  as  the  reconstruction  of Boryspil  airport,  the  construction  o f a 
protective  housing  over  the  damaged  nuclear  reactor  at  Chornobyl,  etc.)  the 
Ukrainian  authorities  are  ready  to  enact  separate  legal  instruments  granting 
additional  privileges  to  the  said  investors.

CURRENT AFFAIRS
15
All  foreign  investors  are  given  guarantees  against  subsequent  changes  in 
the  Ukrainian  legislation  governing  the  foreign  investments  if such  changes 
have  an  adverse  effect  on  foreign  investment  activities  in  Ukraine  (Art.  8). 
According  to  Art.  31-2  of  the  decree,  if  the  Ukrainian  legislation  imposes 
new  taxes  which  did  not  exist  at  the  time  of  the  adoption  of  this  decree, 
existing  enterprises  with  foreign  investments  shall  be  exempt  from  these 
taxes  for  a  5  year  period.
How  much  this  guarantee  is  really  worth  may  be  called  into  question. 
The  Law  on  Foreign  Investments  included  similar  provisions;  nevertheless 
VAT  was  subsequently  im posed  on  foreign  investors  by  the  previous 
Ukrainian  government.
The  decree  stipulates  the  protection  of foreign  investments  against  nation­
alisation  and  expropriation.  There  is  a  complete  ban  on  the  nationalisation 
and  confiscation  of  foreign  invested  assets.  The  authorities  are  not  entitled 
to  requisition  foreign  investments,  except  as  emergency  measures.  Decisions 
regarding  em ergency  requisition  and  com pensation  conditions  may  be 
appealed  in  the  courts  under Art.  50  of the  decree  (Art.  9).
The  decree  likewise  stipulates  compensation  and  damages  for  losses 
(including  moral  hazards)  incurred  by  foreign  investors  as  a  result  of unlaw­
ful  actions  by  Ukrainian  state  bodies  and  government  officials.  All  expenses 
and  losses  shall  be  indemnified  at  current  market  rates  and/or  established 
values  certified  by  independent  auditors.  Compensation  is  to  be  paid  in  the 
currency  in  which  the  investment  was  made  or  in  any  other  currency 
acceptable  to  the  investor  (Art.  10).
The  inclusion  of  the  concept  o f  moral  losses  reflects  a  new  trend  in 
Ukrainian  legislation.  This  concept  has  appeared  in  the  Civil  Code  of  Ukraine 
only  recently.  However,  Ukrainian  court  practice  is  not  familiar with  it  and  has 
not  yet  developed  criteria  for  determining  moral  losses.  At  the  present  time 
Ukrainian  judges  are  uncertain  what  the  concept  of moral  losses  means  within 
the  context  of  the  decree.  Under  these  circumstances  it  might  be  helpful  for 
the  Ukrainian  judiciary  to  apply  the  practice  of  countries  which  have  already 
accumulated  the  relevant legal  experience  in  the  form  of judicial  precedents.
In  the  event  of  the  suspension  or  termination  of  investment  activities  the 
investors  are  guaranteed  compensation  for  their  investments  together  with 
proceeds  therefrom  in  the  form  of money  or  commodities  within  the  period 
of  6  months  from  the  date  of termination  as  soon  as  all  outstanding  obliga­
tions  are  met  (Art.  11).
Remittance  or  repatriation  o f  profits  is  permitted  under  defined  condi­
tions.  Thus,  an  enterprise  with  foreign  investment  is  liable  to  15  per  cent  of 
the  sum  remitted  or  repatriated  (Art.  12,  3D-
Revenues  obtained  as  a  result  of  investment  activity  may  be  reinvested  in 
Ukraine.  The  proper  procedure  is  set  forth  in  the  Law  on  Investment Activity 
and  in  this  decree  (Art.  13).
Additional  guarantees  for  foreign  investors  may  derive  from  international 
agreements  concluded  by  Ukraine.  Hence,  the  decree  stipulates  that  Ukraine

16
THE UKRAINIAN  REVIEW
will  adhere  to  her  international  obligations  even  if they  establish  certain  privi­
leges  to  foreign  investors  which are  absent in the  Ukrainian  legislation  (Art.  6).
It  is  envisaged  by  the  Ukrainian  legislation  (Art.  1  o f  the  Law  on 
Entrepreneurship,  Art.  22  o f  the  decree)  that  any  entrepreneurship  activity 
on  the  territory  of  Ukraine  requires  government  registration.  In  the  case  of 
foreign  investments  registration  is  carried  out  by  the  Council  of  Ministers  of 
the  Republic  of  Crimea,  or  the  regional  state  administrations  of  Kyiv  and 
Sevastopil  after  the  foreign  investor  has  submitted  the  necessary  information 
in  the  standard  format  established  by  the  Ministry  of  Finance  of  Ukraine. 
Unregistered  foreign  investments  do  not  entitle  the  investor  to  the  privileges 
envisaged by  the  decree  (Art.  14).
A  notable  feature  of  the  decree  is  the  very  short  period  of  time  within 
which  the  responsible  bodies  are  obliged  to  complete  the  registration:  3 
working  days  only.  The  Ministry  o f  Finance  o f  Ukraine  must  issue  the 
investment  certificate  within  60  days  after  receiving  the  necessary  informa­
tion  from  the  foreign  investor  (Art.  15).  However,  the  decree  does  not  speci­
fy  what will  happen  if these  bodies  violate  this  provision.
As  far  as  organisational  and  juridical  forms  of  enterprises  with  foreign 
investment  are  concerned,  the  latter  are  to  be  established  within  the  organi­
sational  and  legal  forms  envisaged by  the  Ukrainian  legislation  (Art.  19).
Some  problems  may  arise  for  foreign  investors  with  regard  to  labour  rela­
tions  between  a  foreign  employer  and  his  employees.  According  to  the 
decree  all  pertinent  labour  relations  are  to  be  governed  by  collective  con­
tracts  and  individual  labour  agreements  (Art.  36).  The  terms  o f  collective 
contracts  are  additionally  specified  in  Art.  10-20  of  the  Labour  Code  of 
Ukraine.6  The  important  provision  is  that  neither  a  collective  contract  nor  an 
individual  agreement  should  render  the  status  of the  employees  worse  than 
that  stipulated  by  the  labour  legislation  of  Ukraine  currently  in  force.  The 
same  applies  to  the  citizens  of foreign  states  working  within  the  territory  of 
Ukraine.  It  should  be  noted  that  foreign  law  does  not  apply  to  issues  gov­
erned  by  the  imperative  norms  o f the  labour  law  o f Ukraine.
It  has  to  be  admitted  that  certain  provisions  of  this  decree  contradict  the 
existing  laws  of Ukraine.  Thus,  Art.  3-3  refers  to  land  as  one  of the  types  of 
foreign  investments  and  Art.  4.3  stipulates  directly  the  possibility  for  foreign 
investors  to  buy  plots  if  there  is  no  such  prohibition  in  the  Ukrainian  law. 
However,  the  Land  Code  of Ukraine  (Art.  6)  does  not envisage  any  rights  for 
foreigners  to  buy  land  for  individual  or  collective  use.7  While  according  to 
Art.  42  o f the  decree  the  provisions  of the  Land  Code  of Ukraine  are  obliga­
tory  to  everyone.
It  seems  that  the  most  likely  resolution  of  this  discrepancy  will  be  to 
introduce  amendments  into  the  Land  Code  in  order  to  stimulate  foreign 
investments  in  Ukraine.
6  Labour Code of Ukraine,  10  December  1971.
7  Land Code  of Ukraine,  13 March  1992.

CURRENT AFFAIRS
17
At the  same  time  it  must be borne  in  mind  that even  in  some  Western  coun­
tries  land  and  objects  o f industrial  property  or  other  objects  cannot  be  bought 
for  private  ownership.  In  this  situation  the  possibility  of  long-term  leasing  of 
land  (provided  for  under  existing  Ukrainian  legislation)  cannot  reasonably  be 
considered an  insurmountable  barrier  to foreign  investment  activity  in  Ukraine.
As  regards  the  settlement  of  disputes  involving  foreign  investors,  the 
decree  makes  a  distinction  between  disputes  in  which  one  party  is  the 
Ukrainian  government  and  other  types  of dispute.
In  the  former  case,  that  is,  disputes  between  foreign  investors  and  the 
government  on  issues  of state  regulation  of foreign  investment  and  the  activ­
ities  of enterprises  with  foreign  investment,  they  are  to  be  examined  by  the 
courts  o f  Ukraine  if  not  otherwise  specified  by  international  agreements  to 
which  Ukraine  is  a  party.
All  other  disputes  shall  be  examined  by  the  courts  and/or  arbitration  tri­
bunals  of Ukraine  or,  if agreed  by  the  parties,  by  conciliation  courts,  includ­
ing  those  abroad.  In  this  way,  the  decree  permits  the  involvement  of foreign 
courts  in  the  settlement  of disputes  regarding  foreign  investment,  thus  taking 
a  further  step  forward  in  securing  the  interests  of  foreign  physical  and  legal 
persons  in  Ukraine.

Download 16.82 Mb.

Do'stlaringiz bilan baham:
1   ...   31   32   33   34   35   36   37   38   ...   44




Ma'lumotlar bazasi mualliflik huquqi bilan himoyalangan ©fayllar.org 2020
ma'muriyatiga murojaat qiling