English for Academic Purposes (eap) vs general English—a 101 crash course


Download 1.33 Mb.
Pdf ko'rish
Sana18.09.2020
Hajmi1.33 Mb.

English for Academic Purposes (EAP) vs. 

general English—a 101 crash course

Presenter: Zoe Smith 

Commissioning Editor for Macmillan Skillful series


Summary:

EAP has been one of the most recent booms in English language 

markets across the world, with a free flow of international 

students wishing to gain access to higher education courses 

taught in English. But what does EAP mean exactly, and how 

should a teacher trained in traditional ELT methods adapt to 

students who need to operate in a higher education learning 

environment? This presentation offers an overview of some of 

the differences between teaching and studying EAP vs. general 

English, featuring excerpts from Macmillan’s brand new EAP 

series, Skillful.

© Zoe Smith, 2013

2


Unit 1: At the Shops

Exciting Role Play

Storekeeper:

Hello. How can I help you?

Customer:

Hello. I would like to buy a loaf of bread.

Storekeeper:

Sure. Bread is in aisle 3.

Customer:

Where is aisle 3?

Storekeeper: 

It’s over there. It’s next to the pasta.

Customer:

And how much is the bread?

Storekeeper:

I don’t know. It’s on the price tag.

Customer:

Oh, okay. Thank you.

Storekeeper:

You’re welcome. Have a nice day. And we’ll discuss 

quantum physics next time.

© Zoe Smith, 2013

3


Types of oral production for EAP:

© Zoe Smith, 2013

4

argument

(NOT fighting)


© Zoe Smith, 2013

5


However, many international students fail to reach their 

potential at an overseas university.

Why?

Knowing how to structure the 



language they know effectively.

© Zoe Smith, 2013

6


Teachers have a responsibility to prepare students for the real demands of 

studying overseas. A lot of teachers think academic English is about preparing 

students for exams. But, as we have our own experience of, many of our 

students who perform well in English exams still struggle to communicate in 

English. Teaching English for test taking is more about the strategy of test 

taking. It doesn’t consider some of the wider key areas of being able to 

perform in a real world academic setting. 

© Zoe Smith, 2013

7


Key area #1:

Being confident to take part in academic debate

© Zoe Smith, 2013

8


Sub issue a: 

Cultural difference – in a Western university, students must not 

be afraid of expressing their opinion. To some extent, this is 

about CONFIDENCE.

Critical thinking - It’s also important your students understand 

the word ‘CRITICAL’. It doesn’t mean that you say bad things 

about your teacher’s clothing, for example. The word ‘critical’ 

has had a much more sophisticated concept for around 500 

years, related to the word ‘crucial’, and being about deciding 

what is most important in the meaning of something. 



CRITICAL THINKING is at the heart of EAP.

© Zoe Smith, 2013

9


Solution:

© Zoe Smith, 2013

10

A scenario of a student – a 



mirror of the student 

using this book

Think about and reflect on 

how the scenario relates 

to yourself.

Whole construction of 

page doesn’t really need 

teacher input, so very easy 

to use!


Sub issue b: 

Students feel linguistically inadequate alongside native-speaker 

students. After all, surely only a native speaker is going to say 

something such as: 

“Well if you’d care for my impartial view on 

the matter, which pertains to the utmost 

thought of the philosopher in question, I’d 

surmise that the answer to your question 

would be ‘no’.”

© Zoe Smith, 2013

11


Solution:

© Zoe Smith, 2013

12


Key area #2:

Knowing how to write an academic essay in English

© Zoe Smith, 2013

13


Sub issue 1: 

Cultural difference – some cultures favour indirect, vague 

language, that never gets to the main point. 

Some cultures also 

favour plagiarism 

– after all, why 

try to disrespect text that another author has already written 

perfectly elsewhere?

© Zoe Smith, 2013

14


Solution:

It is as much about 

understanding 

organizational frameworks 

of language as 

it is to understand the content and all the words within a text.

© Zoe Smith, 2013

15


© Zoe Smith, 2013

16

Solution:



Writing skills

A reading task…

© Zoe Smith, 2013

17


…extends into a writing task:

© Zoe Smith, 2013

18


Sub issue b: 

Students feel 

linguistically inadequate 

alongside native 

speaker students. After all, surely only a native speaker is going to be able to 

know how to select the correct modal verbs to make this sentence sound really 

respectful:

Well if you’d care for my impartial view on the 

matter, which pertains to the utmost thought of the 

philosopher in question, I’d surmise that the answer 

to your question would be ‘no’.

© Zoe Smith, 2013

19


In EAP, you can practice 

‘traditional’ grammar, too…

… but it’s helpful when you can 

put the grammar into an 

academic text.

Solution:

© Zoe Smith, 2013

20


© Zoe Smith, 2013

21


© Zoe Smith, 2013

22


© Zoe Smith, 2013

23


© Zoe Smith, 2013

24


© Zoe Smith, 2013

25


Extra tips:

• Encourage students to bring in authentic texts from 

the academic subjects that they will be studying at 

university.

• Students could keep a reflective learning journal.

• Skillful has extended online practice through the 

Digibooks.

• Any other good ideas?

© Zoe Smith, 2013

26


=The End=

Presenter contact: 

zoe.smith@macmillan.com

Skillful website: www.macmillanskillful.com

© Zoe Smith, 2013



27

Download 1.33 Mb.

Do'stlaringiz bilan baham:




Ma'lumotlar bazasi mualliflik huquqi bilan himoyalangan ©fayllar.org 2020
ma'muriyatiga murojaat qiling