Extensional Rheometry: From Entangled Melts to Dilute Solutions Professor Gareth H. McKinley


Download 283.28 Kb.
Pdf ko'rish
Sana14.09.2018
Hajmi283.28 Kb.

1

Extensional Rheometry:


From Entangled Melts to Dilute Solutions"

Professor Gareth H. McKinley 

Director, Hatsopoulos Microfluids Laboratory 

Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, M.I.T. 

Cambridge, MA 01239 

http://web.mit.edu/nnf


Macosko & McKinley Rheometer Repairs LLC!!

2


3

The Role of Fluid Rheology!

•  “Slimy” 

•   “Sticky”

 

•  Other manifestations: ‘stringy’, ‘tacky’, ‘stranding’, ‘ropiness’, ‘pituity’, 



‘long’ vs. ‘short’ texture... 

0





https://youtu.be/pZAl_g0f9IM

Video Credit: Arif Nelson, Natsuki Okuda

Ewoldt Research Group, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Key Phenomenon 3. Extensional-Thickening



“Strong Flows”!

•  Flow is irrotational, or “vorticity free”:  POTENTIAL FLOW 

•  Importantly: material points separate exponentially in time  

in an extensional flow field 

5

v

= ∇Φ


∇ ⋅= ∇ ⋅(∇Φ) = ∇

2

Φ = 0



 v

x

= !


ε

0

x

 

dx

dt

≡ v



x

= !


ε

0

x

 

dx

x

≡ !



ε

0

dt

0

t

 Δ= ΔX



0

exp(


!

ε

0



t)

 ε

H

= !

ε

0



t

= ln L(tL

0

(

)



The Hencky Strain  

(or “True Strain”) 

H.Hencky 1924 

M. Tanyeri, C. M. Schroeder, et al.  

 Lab on a Chip, (2011). 

S. Haward, GHM, Amy Shen  



Scientific Reports, (2016). 

Positive Lyapunov Exponent 

A “Strong Flow” 

6

Kinematics of Deformation!

•  There are three major classes of extensional flow: 

  



v

x

= −


1

2



ε

0

(1



b)x

v

y

= −


1

2



ε

0

(1



− b)y

v

z

= 


ε

0

z

Simple Shear

Simple Shear-Free Flow



Fiber-spinning

Thermoforming

Calendering/rolling

b = flow type parameter

  v



x

= 


γ y

Bird, Armstrong & Hassager, (1987)

7

•  There are three major classes of extensional flow: 

  

v

x

= −


1

2



ε

0

(1



b)x

v

y

= −


1

2



ε

0

(1



− b)y

v

z

= 


ε

0

z

Simple Shear

Simple Shear-Free Flow



Fiber-spinning

Thermoforming

Calendering/rolling

b = flow type parameter

  v



x

= 


γ y

Bird, Armstrong & Hassager, (1987)

Kinematics of Food Rheology!!



8

Transient Extensional Rheometry!

10

6

10



5

10

4



10

3

10



2

10

1



10

0

10



-1

10

-2



•  The extensional viscosity is best considered as a 

transient material 

function: follow evolution from equilibrium to steady state (or break-up!) 

 

Zero-Shear Rate Viscosity [Pa.s]



Meissner 

Apparatus (RME)

SER Fixture

Opposed Jet Devices

Contraction Flows (microfluidic)

Filament 

Stretching 

Rheometers

(FISER)

Capi

llary T

hinni

ng &

 Break

up R

heom

eters

Melts

Dilute Sol

utions

Sentmanat, Wang & McKinley, J. Rheol. May 2005

McKinley & Sridhar, 

Ann. Reviews of Fluid Mech, 2002

20 µm


10

-3

McKinley, 



Ann. Rheol. Reviews 2005

Pipe & McKinley, 



Rheol. Acta (AERC 2007)

9

Nonlinear Extensional Viscosity!

•  Extensional flows are “strong flows” which result in extensive molecular 

deformation, microstructural alignment and high tensile stresses 

q 

Applications: fiber-spinning, blow-molding, sheet-molding, extrusion, coating 



Strain Hardening

η

E

+

( ˙ 


ε 

0

,t)



=

τ

zz

(t)

τ



rr

(t)

[

]

˙ 



ε 

0

lim



t

→∞

η



E

+

( ˙ 



ε 

0

,)



η

E

( ˙ 

ε 

0



)

Tension-Thickening

Transient Response

Molecular alignment 

increases with 

Hencky strain

:

Steady-State Response ?

Increasing molecular 

alignment at higher strain rates

ε(t) =

˙ 

ε ( ′ 


′ 

−∞

t

= ln


L(t)

L

0

˙ 



ε 

0

t

λ ˙ 

ε 

0



Trouton (1906):

η

E

= 3

µ

E



xt

ens


iona

V



is

cos


it

y

E



xt

ens


iona

V



is

cos


it

y

‘stretch’



‘coil’

Newtonian

Solution

Melt


 De = λ ε

0

Deborah



Number

b = 0

10

Tensile Stress Surface!

•  The evolution of the extensional viscosity can be visualized as a function of 

time and strain rate. 

 De

s

= 


ε × τ

s1

t s

[ ]


Tr(De,t)

=

η



E

+

η



0

Stretching of branched 

species for 

De

s

 > 1 


Constant 

velocity 

stretching 

Necking 


Increasing 

strain rate 

Increasing viscosity 

(strain hardening) 

Time of 

experiment 

 

η

E



(

ε



0

t)

⇔ Tr(De,

ε)


Fred Trouton!

doi:10.1016/S0377-0257(06)00214-X

11

The Pitch Drop Experiment



http://smp.uq.edu.au/content/pitch-drop-experiment

(see special Trouton Centennial Edition of JNNFM, 2006)

ΔL

L

0

~



t

3

µ



η

E

≡ 3


µ

12

Importance of Extensional Rheology!

2 cm

20 µm


(a)

(b)


(c)

(d)


(e)

6.35 m


m

•  Dominates many processing operations 

•  Effects are frequently transient in nature… 

 

(f)



McKinley, Annual Rheology Reviews, BSR 2005  (or from http://web.mit.edu/nnf/publications) 

13

Polymer Melts"

•  SER Universal Testing Platform: specifically designed 

so that it can be easily accommodated onto a number 

of commercially available torsional rheometers 

•  TA Instruments version;  

EVF = Extensional Viscosity Fixture 

•  Can be housed within the host system’s environmental 

chamber for controlled temperature experiments. 

q 

Requires only 5-200mg of material 



q 

Can be used up to temperatures of 250°C 

q 

Easily detachable for fixture changeover/clean-up



  

Validation Experiments:  

LDPE (BASF Lupolen

®

 1840H) 



(Sentmanat, Wang & McKinley;  JoR Mar/Apr (2005) 

Þ 

M



n

 =   17,000;  M

w

 = 243,000;  M



w

/ M


n

 = 14.3


  

Þ 

CH



3

/1000C = 23

 

Þ 

Very similar to the IUPAC A reference material   



Þ 

Same polymer as that used by 

 

Münstedt 



et al

., Rheol. Acta 



37

, 21-29 (1998) 

‘Münstedt rheometer’ (end separation method) 

Sentmanat, Rheol. Acta (2004) 



1.5” 

1.5” 

14

SER Principle of Operation"

•  “Constant Sample Length” Extensional Rheometer 

•  Ends of sample affixed to windup drums, such that 

for a constant drum rotation:  



.

 ε


0

= 2


Ω

R

L

•  Resulting torque on transducer (attached to housing) 



T

= 2(


F

F



friction

)

R

SER Fixture with ARES Rheometer


15

Comparison of LDPE Stress Growth Curves"

•  Good agreement with LVE response at short times (

t ≥ 0.01 s) 

•  Increasing strain-hardening and sample rupture at high rates



 

•  The results with the SER (

red curves

) show excellent agreement 

with literature results from Münstedt et al. (black symbols & lines) 

η

E

+

= 3


η

+

(t)



16

Inter-Lab Comparison:  the elongational viscosity of polyisoprene 

Elongational measurements performed at room temp, T=25

o

C,  



at an elongational rate of e

.

=0.003 s


-1  

Polyisoprene, T

g

= –70


o

C, M


w

=1.8


.

10

6



 g/mole,  M

w

/M



n

=1.1, 


 G

n

0



=400 kPa;  #entanglements, Z ≈ 280. 

 

Xpansion Instruments, SER



 

TA Instruments, EVF

 

Motor 


Load 

cell 


Movable 

sleds 


Filament 

Laser 


emitter 

Detector 

1:2 

gearing 


Filament stretching rheometer, FSR

 

GHM with Jens Kromann Nielsen, jkn@kt.dtu.dk; Ole Hassager, oh@kt.dtu.dk,  



Technical University of Denmark (DTU), Lyngby, Denmark 

Transient elongational viscosity

1.00E+06


1.00E+07

1.00E+08


1.00E+09

0

50



100

150


200

250


300

350


400

450


500

Time [sec]

Viscosity [Pa*s]

SER_MIT


LVE

EVF_MIT


FSR_Denmark

1.00E+06


1.00E+07

1.00E+08


1.00E+09

1

10



100

1000


Time [sec]

Viscosity 

[Pa*s]

SER_MIT


LVE

EVF_MIT


FSR_Denmark

FSR data differ at low 

extensions; reverse 

squeeze shear flow; 

EVF and SER perfect at 

small strains 

Filament failure later 

for FSR, due to closed 

loop control.  

EVF and SER fail 

earlier; slip at rolls, 

surface defect critical 

DTU    

DTU        



•  Compare experimental measurements with THREE different extensional rheometers 

using one model entangled and monodisperse polymer 



17

The Role of Chain-Branching!

•  Extensional stress growth is a 

strong function of the level of 

molecular branching. 

•  Branch points act as ‘crosslinks’ 

that efficiently elongate chains 

and transmit stress… 

q 

Provided they are long enough to 



be 

entangled

 

H.M. Laun, Int. Cong. Rheol. 1980



18

2 m


Filament Stretching Extensional Rheometer (F

ISER


)

!

•  A ‘constant volume’ based transient extensional rheometer 



•  Based around linear motion control system with  

real-time 

force

 and 


midpoint radius

 data acquisition.

 

Tr

+



η

E

+

( ˙ 



ε 

0

,)



η

0

=



Δτ(t)

η

0



˙ 

ε 

0



De

=

λ ˙ 



ε 

0

˙ 



ε 

0

= −



2

R

mid

(t)

R

mid

(t)

dt

ε =


˙ 

ε 

0



′ 

0

t

= 2ln


R

0

R



mid

(t)

⎛ 

⎝ ⎜ 


⎞ 

⎠ ⎟ 


q

Tirtaatmadja & Sridhar (1993)



 

Þ



Impose

 kinematics that ensure 

fluid elements at midplane undergo 

ideal uniaxial deformation

 

R

mid

(

t

)

•    Hencky strains of up to e ≈ 7 and rates up to 20 s



-1

 are typically achievable 

 

McKinley & Sridhar, Ann. Rev. Fluid Mech (2002). 



F(t)

V

z

(t)

S.L. Anna (2000) 



19

Kinematics of Filament Stretching!

•  Filament stretching is inherently a 

transient technique.  

q 

Focus on the complete kinematic history of single fluid element.  



q 

MWCSH           

 Transient Uniaxial  Extensional Viscosity.

 

1



2

time, t


R

mid

F

V

z

= ˙ 


ε 

0

L

0

e

+ ˙ 


ε 

0

t



A

1

2



Force!

Eulerian!

Lagrangian!

F(t)

R

mid

(t)

η 

+

( ˙ 



ε 

0

,t)



V

el

oc



it

y, v(z


,t

)

V



el

oc

it



y, v

A

(t



)

time, t


1

2

F(t)



A

1

2



Force!

Eulerian!

Lagrangian!

Spinning

 Viscosity

= const

(along spinline)

V

el

oc



it

y, v(z


,t

)

V



el

oc

it



y, v

A

(t



)

Swell


Shear 

1

2

 Z



A

Z



A

0

exp( 



Et)

 

V



z

= EL

0

exp( 


Et )

R

mid

()



20

Analysis of Data from a Filament Stretching (F

ISER

) Test!


 

η

E

+

= Δτ


(t)

!

ε



0

=

1



!

ε

0



F(t)

π

R

2

(t)



− σ

R(t)

⎣⎢



⎦⎥


21

Extensional Rheology of Dilute Polymer Solutions!

•  Dilute polymer solutions exhibit pronounced 

strain-hardening

 

q 

Extensional viscosity can reach up to 1000 times zero-shear-rate viscosity! 



•  At intermediate strain rates (4≤ 

De ≤ 50) curves superpose to form a universal curve 

•  Steady state not approached until Hencky strains of e ≥ 5 

q 

Weakly decreases with increasing rate (solvent interaction? Chain-chain interaction??)  



10

0

10



1

10

2



10

3

0



0.2

0.4


0.6

0.8


De = 8.13

De = 10.2

De = 20.0

De = 51.0

De = 61.7

Trouton Ratio

t/

λ

Z



Tr = 3

10

0



10

1

10



2

10

3



0

1

2



3

4

5



6

De = 8.13

De = 10.2

De = 20.0

De = 51.0

De = 61.7

Trouton Ratio

Hencky Strain



Tr = 3

De

× t

λ

1

( )



= ˙ 

ε 

0



t

 Tr = η

+

(



ε

0

,t)



η

0

Trouton Ratio



22

An Inter-Laboratory Comparison: Polystyrene Solutions!

•  Dilute and semi-dilute monodisperse PS/PS ideal elastic liquids 

q 

Homologous series of increasing 



M

w

 =2 x 10



6

 – 20 x 10

6

 g/mol.


 

S.L. Anna et al. 



J. Rheol. 2001 (Jan/Feb) 

10

0



10

1

10



2

10

3



0

1

2



3

4

5



6

7

Trouton 



Ratio

Hencky Strain



SM-1 Fluid

Tr = 3

(a)


(b)

(c)


(d)

Toronto  De = 12

Monash  De = 14

M.I.T. 


De = 17

SM-1 Fluid: M



w

 =2 x 10

6

 



g/mol



c =

 

500 ppm.  c/c* = 0.23 



FENE-PM Theory

23

 = 0


N

G

O



 = 1.0

De = 1.97

1/Ca = 0

0

 = 0.54



 = 0.261

 = 0.316


N - Newtonian

G - Giesekus

O - Oldroyd-B 

N

G



O

 = 2.0


N

G

O



 = 3.0

N

G



O

 = 3.4


F

Numerical Analysis of Filament Stretching!

N = Newtonian

G = Giesekus

O = Oldroyd-B

De = 2


Computational Rheometry



 plays a key role in ensuring such 

devices achieve optimal kinematics (aspect ratio, surface 

tension, gravity...) 

q 

2D or 3D, transient viscoelastic free surface calculation! 



q 

Eulerian and/or Lagrangian FEM, BEM, Connffessit, MD... 

Yao et al. JNNFM, 2000


24

Spatial Localization of Deformation!



D

zz

˙ 

ε 



0

1.5


1.0

0.5


0.0

Oldroyd-B

De = 7.5

Giesekus

De = 7.5

a = 0.316



Necking

Stabilized

25

Concentrated Solutions & Melts!

•  Much less pronounced strain-hardening in transient Trouton ratio 

•  Numerical simulation plays a key role in validating data analysis 

•  Recent experiments show that at 

De

R



 ≥ 1 (based on Rouse time) 

significant effects of segmental stretch can be observed 



Shear-thinning fluid

7 mm


1

10

0



1

2

3



4

5

5wt% PS/(DOP/TCP) Solution

ε = 2.84 s

-1

ε = 3.89 s



-1

ε = 4.68 s

-1

Hencky Strain



˙ 

ε 

0



T

ra

ns



ie

nt

 T



rout

on Ra


ti

o

Li & Burghardt, JNNFM 1998



De = 2.0

˙ 

ε 



0

˙ 

ε 



0

26

Ongoing Work: Rupture!

•  For weakly strain-hardening materials, filament may fail 

through a viscoelastic ‘necking’ & rupture process. 

q 

Ductile elastic instability (not driven by surface tension). 



q 

Strongly stabilized by chain-branching... 



Considère criterion (1885) ; 



for stability (De >> 1) 

•  A decreasing force is a necessary but not sufficient 

condition for observing rapid necking! 

q 

Key role of ‘viscous’ terms in polydisperse melts and 



conc. solutions . 

t

rupture

R

2

mid

(t)

Dt

(t)

strain

2wt% HEUR



De≈1.4

Associating 

Polymer

1/50th speed

Tripathi et al. Macromol. 

36

(5); 2006;  Cromer, Cook, McKinley; Chem. Eng. Sci. 2010

F

z

(t)

ln Tr

+

d

ε

≥ 1


27

Capillary Breakup Extensional Rheometry (C

ABER

)!

•  A quantitative version of the ‘thumb & forefinger’ test! 



q 

Original experimental and theoretical work of 

V. Entov & co-workers

 

q 



Extensional equivalent of a ‘step-strain’ experiment 

Generate !

Liquid Bridge

Monitor D

mid

(t) & D(z,t)



Shape

 

of 



D

mid


(t)

 curve


 and 

time to breakup

 provide information about 

extensional rheological properties of fluid at large strains. 

q 

Small sample volume, rapid test, useful for foods, dyes, consumer products...  



6 mm

5 m


m

Micrometer

Video

Form Filament

15 – 25  m

m

Newtonian



Viscoelastic

Adhesive



D

mid

(t)

t

break

Time


D

ia

m



et

er



28

Commercial Realization!

•  Cambridge Polymer Group  

CaBER


1

 


29

Application Areas!

•  Materials with time-varying properties; 

e.g.  paints, adhesives, foodstuffs... 

q 

Rapid test time, small sample volume.  



q 

simple pragmatic indexing application. 



30

Results for Simple Fluids!



Newtonian Fluids



 

q



McKinley & Tripathi, 

J Rheol., 2000

 





Ideal Elastic Fluids

 

q



Entov & Hinch, 

JNNFM, 1997

 

R



mid

R

0

= 0.0709



σ

η

s



R

0

t



c

t

(

)

R



mid

R

0

=



GR

0

σ



⎛ 

⎝ 

⎞ 



⎠ 

1/ 3


exp



t

3

λ

1



⎛ 

⎝ ⎜ 


⎞ 

⎠ ⎟ 


2

R

0

 = 6 mm



t

cap

=

η



0

R

0

σ ~ 8 sec



Laser

Micrometer

P

ol



ys

tyre


ne

 O

il



S

M

-1 (500 ppm



 2

x

10



6

 g/


m

ol

.



31

Capillarity-Induced Filament Breakup 



(summary of video)

!

1 mm



t = 0 s

t = 2.1 s

t = 4.2 s

t = 6.3 s

t = 8.6 s

t = 10.5 s

t = 0 s

t = 8.5 s

t = 17.0 s

t = 25.5 s

t = 34.0 s

t = 42.5 s

SM-1 Fluid

:  

0.05 wt% PS (M



w

 = 2 x 10

6

 g/mol.) in oligomeric styrene



PS Oil:

 

Oligomeric styrene



Bo

=

ρgR



0

2

σ ≈ 19



t

*

=



η

0

R

0

σ

(



)

= 8.5s


t

*

= 9.8 s



32

The Newtonian Fluid!



McKinley & Tripathi, 



J. Rheol. 2000. 

R



mid

0.1



σ

ρg



Gravity Unimportant

D

ia



m

et

er 2



R

min

 [m


m

]


33

Dilute Polymer Solutions!

•  Increasing molecular weight delays elasto-capillary breakup 

•  Measured time-scale agrees quantitatively with Zimm relaxation time 

•  Important in many biological processes (saliva, spinning of spider silk) 

.

0.01



0.1

1

0



5

10

15



20

25

30



35

40

SM-1 Fluid



SM-2 Fluid

SM-3 Fluid

Oldroyd-B

D

/D



0

t/(


η

0

R



0

/

σ)



−1 (3

λ

Zimm

)

Finite Extensibility

..

.

..

10



0

10

1



10

2

10



3

10

6



10

7

λ



z

 [

se



c]

M

w



 [g/mol]

..

10



0

10

1



10

2

10



3

10

6



10

7

η



p

  

[Pa



.s]

M

w



 [g/mol]

10

3



10

2

10



1

10

0



λ

z

 [

se



c]

η



p

 [

Pa



. s

]

M



w

 [g/mol]

10

6

SM1 



SM2 

SM3 


34

The “Apparent Extensional Viscosity”!

3

η

0



3

η

0



3

η

0



.

1

10



100

1000


10000

100000


1000000

0

1



2

3

4



5

6

7



8

Viscoelastic  Adhesives

"Bad"


"OK"

"Good"


Ex

te

ns



io

na

l Vi



sc

os

it



[Pa


.s

]

Hencky Strain



.

1

10



100

1000


10000

100000


1000000

0

1



2

3

4



5

6

7



8

Viscoelastic  Adhesives

"Bad"


"OK"

"Good"


Ex

te

ns



io

na

l Vi



sc

os

it



[Pa


.s

]

Hencky Strain



35

Associative Polymer Solutions!



Hydrophobically-modified Ethoxylate-Urethane (HEUR) polymer



 

q 

Prepared by R.D. Jenkins; Union-Carbide (Singapore) 



q 

Used as an ‘associative thickener’  for paints etc… 2wt% in water 

•  Fails by a different mechanism: 

q 

Initial elastocapillary thinning 



q 

at a critical radius, thread ‘pinches off’... 

•   Concept of a critical stress 

q



Flower micelles

 form a physically-cross-

linked network (‘physical gel’):  

loops

bridges

hydrophobes

Δτ

network

~

σ

R



min

q 

Tensile stress grows as radius decreases:  



36

Capillary Breakup of Foodstuffs;  e.g. Yogurts!

•  CaBER provides a simple probe of response (‘texture’) of liquid foods 

q 

Product quality control & process monitoring  



•  Commonly described by the power-law fluid: 

4

6



8

10

-4



2

4

6



8

10

-3



2

Radius 


[m]

0.15


0.10

0.05


0.00

Time [sec]

 Reg

 Non-fat


 Fit for Reg

 Fit for Non-fat



R

mid

(t)

=

2

n



σ

3K



t

c

− t

[

]

n



n = 0.30

n = 0.23

τ = η( ˙ 

γ ) ˙ 

γ  = ˙ 



γ 

n

−1

{



}

˙ 

γ 



1000 fps

37

Flow Through Porous Media!

•  Solutions of flexible polymers and self-assembling wormlike surfactants are 

commonly used in 

enhanced oil recovery (EOR) and reservoir fracturing operations.  

Kefi et al. (2004) Oilfield Review

M

ü

ller & Sanz in Kausch & Nguyen, 1997



D

im

ens



ionl

es

s



P

re

ss



ure

 drop




38

Extensional Viscosity of Wormlike Surfactants!

•  Solutions of EHAC (Schlumberger 

“clearfrac”, VES) in brine 

Yesilata, Clasen & McKinley, JNNFM 

133

(2) 2006

Kim, Pipe, McKinley; Kor-Aust Rheol. J, 2010

 

D

mid

(t)

⇒ 

ε(t) = −



2

D

mid

dD

mid

dt

η



E,apparent

(t)



39

Low Viscosity Elastic Fluids!

Electrospinning PEO/Water 

Fong, Chun & Reneker, Polymer 1999 

Forward Roll Coating (HEC) 

Fernando et al. , 

Prog. Org. Coating

 2003 


2 cm

20 µm


Increasing Molecular Weight

40

Low Viscosity Fluids!

•  Critical to Inkjet Printing 

q 

100-1000 drops per second 



q 

Drop volume 2-10 picoliter 

q 

Eliminate formation of spray and “satellite 



droplets” 

•  Identical viscosities and surface tensions 

q 

One contains 



Poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO)

 

M



w

 = 1,000,000 g/mol

,  

c = 100 ppm



 

•  Viscous effects are never important compared 

to inertial, capillary, elastic effects!! 

q



Inviscid Viscoelastic Fluids…. 

De

0

=



λ

ρR

0

3

σ



O(1)

Elastic effects

 

Inertio-capillary effects



 

Oh

=

η



0

ρσR

0

<<1

Viscous effects 

Inertio-capillary effects

 

V. Tirtaatmadja, J.J. Cooper-White et al., Phys Fluids 



18

 (2006)


41

Break Up of Low Viscosity Liquids!

•  0.1 wt% PEO (2x10

6

 g/mol) in water 



q 

Standard test fluid; 

q 

Plate diameter 



R

= 3mm; Aspect Ratio L = 2.3  



 

η

0



≈ 1.10 ×10

−3

 Pa.s



 

t

R

ρR



0

3

σ ≈ 0.020s



Rayleigh Time Scale 

Rodd, Cooper-White, McKinley; Applied Rheol



15

(1), 12-27; 



 

2005


42

t = 0 ms 

t = 10 ms 

t = 20 ms 

t = 30 ms 

t = 40 ms 

Total time of filament breakup event, 

ΔT = 67ms 

t/

ΔT = 0 


t/

ΔT = 0.15 

t/

ΔT = 0.30 



t/

ΔT = 0.45 

t/

ΔT = 0.60 



0.1% PEO in water, L = 1.8 

Intermediate Aspect Ratio!



43

1.4 


Vary Aspect Ratio

1.8 


Control of Geometry is Critical…!

0.1% PEO in Water 

 

Λ =


L

0

R

0

Inertial oscillations:  

 

t



osc

~

ρR



0

3

σ



 

R

mid

R

1

exp


3

λ

(



)

44

Operating Range of C

ABER

!

•  The range of possible test fluids depends on the natural (intrinsic) 



timescales of interfacial fluid dynamics and test geometry 

q 

Stability boundary can also be weakly affected by ‘strike speed’ and aspect ratio 

q 

Slow Retraction Method (Clasen et al. JNNFM 2011) can improve this somewhat…

 

µ = 0.076 Pa.s 

 

De

0

=



λ

ρR

0

3

σ



≈1

‘Intrinsic’  

Deborah Number 

Viscosity µ  

Relaxation  

Time, λ  



Increasing M

w

 

Increasing  

Solvent viscosity (

h

s





Concentration (c) 

C

ABER

 tests

Impractical

(at present)

Ohnesorge Number 

 

Oh

=

µ



ρR

0

σ



~ 1

l

 ≈ 0.001 s 



Let us spray…!

200 m

µ

Walker & Christanti, Atom & Spray, 2001



Movie from Phil Threlfall-Holmes, ICI => Akzo-Nobel

45


46 

Jet Break-up Extensional Rheometry 

Visco-Capillary Region 

Elasto-Capillary Region 

•  Doc Edgerton: stroboscopy of the jet can slow the 

motion by 10,000 times… 

Video Courtesy: MIT-Tech TV Website 

G

row



th ra

te

Middleman, Chem. Eng. Sci, 



20

, (1965);  

G. Brenn, Z. Liu and F. Durst, 

IJMF

, 26, 1621 (2000) 

Lord Rayleigh 

1842 – 1919

  





Can one extract 

extensional properties 

out of jet break-up 

visualization? 

  



kR

0



2

πf

V



R

0

De

λ

ρR



0

3

σ



O(1)

Elastic effects

 

Inertio-capillary effects



 

Oh

η



0

ρσ R

0

≤ 1


Viscous effects

 

Inertio-capillary effects



 

Dimensionless wave number 



47

Experimental Strobe/Jet Facility for Forced Jets

• Apparatus built with Jim Serdy (Prof. Sachs Lab, MIT)                                     

Features of the set-up

Field of view: 400 µm - few mm; 

Typical feature size ~ 5-200 µm 

Independent control of driving frequency, ƒ & strobe 

frequency, ƒ– Δƒ  (Typically ƒ is few kHz, Δƒ = 0.1Hz )

Bluefox CCD camera from Matrix-Vision, 

(frame rate, F, up to 100 fps)

V

app

= Δ


f

f

V

jet

kR

=

2



π

f

V

jet

R

• We effectively “slow down” the motion, by controlling

  both the delay Δƒ and the drive frequency ƒ

  (The “Wagon Wheel” effect)

strobe

 

 CCD camera, 



with zoom lens

  

Movable stage



 

Piezoelectric transducer

Ceramic nozzle, 175 µm

 

Function Generator 1



 

Function Generator 1I

 

Digital images/ movie 



 

• Amplitude of perturbation controlled 

through voltage applied to piezo-transducer

 Flow rate defines 



jet velocity (We)

• Frequency, ƒ, varied to change the 

wavenumber, kR, of instability

Jet of tap water, V ~ 2.7 m/s, 

Image width ~ 200



 

µm

B. Keshavarz, GHM;  J.Non-Newt. Fluid. Mech. 



222 

(2015)

See also Greiciunas, Vadillo et al. J Rheol., 



61

 (2017)


Rayleigh-Ohnesorge Jet Extensional Rheometer 

(ROJER)

ROJER vs. CaBER 

0

0.5



1

1.5


0

0.5


1

1.5


Oh ≡ η/

ρ



R

0

σ



De

τ



e

/

ρ



R

3 0


/

σ

PEO-300K-0.01wt.% 



  t = 0.8ms

  t = 0.86ms

  t = 0.92ms   t = 0.98ms   t = 1.04ms

  t = 1.10ms

PEO-300

K-0.01wt.



0

0.5



1

1.5


0

0.5


1

1.5


Oh ≡ η/

ρ



R

0

σ



De

τ



e

/

ρ



R

3 0


/

σ

PEO-300K-0.01wt.% 



50 ms

t

= −


38 ms

t

= −


26 ms

t

= −


14 ms

t

= −


2 ms

t

= −


10 ms

t

=

CaBER



Pros: 

1.  Easy to test many solutions

2.  Relatively easy to analyze the data

Cons:


1.  Inertia related problems

2.  Plate separation issues

3.  Fails for very dilute solutions 

(

relaxation times 



less then O(ms)

ROJER:


Pros: 

1.  Relatively easy to analyze the data

2.  At smaller sizes, inertia-related 

issues can be overcome

3.  Measurements down to 

microsecond scale

Cons.:


1.  Nozzle clogging for particulate 

laden systems

Rodd, Cooper-White, GHM, Applied Rheology (2005)

B. Keshavarz, GHM;  J.Non-Newt. Fluid. Mech. 



222 

(2015)

See also Greiciunas, Vadillo et al. J Rheol., 



61

 (2017)


48

49

A Recent Review:!



Microfluidics & Nanofluidics, 2012

High Shear Rate Microfluidic Rheometry !

•  Microfluidic capillary rheometer 

•  0.3% Xanthan Gum (Keltrol™): rigid rod polymer 

•  Strongly shear-thinning; well-described by Carreau-Yasuda model 

ΔP

max


= 50,000 Pa

ΔP

min

= 250 Pa


Q

!

∆P

!

Baek & Magda (2003)  



 J. Rheol.  

Pressure sensors (800x800 µm

2

)!

Glass microchannel on  



gold-coated silicon base

 



P

 

Q = 0.3 ml/min, = 10-30 s  

C.J. Pipe, T. Majmudar & G.H. McKinley, Rheol. Acta 

47(5)

 (2008) 


51

• “I measure the properties in shear but it doesn’t help 

me differentiate between different product grades that 

spray 

(or…dispense, jet, spin…) well” 

ARG2-Cone 4mm-2 degree

Trunca4on gap: 54 microns

10

−1



10

0

10



1

10

2



10

3

10



4

10

5



10

−1

10



0

˙ε,


3 ˙γ [s


1

]



η

an

d



(1

/

3)



η

E

 



 

Shear Data-ARG2

10

−1



10

0

10



1

10

2



10

3

10



4

10

5



10

−1

10



0

˙ε,


3 ˙γ [s


1

]



η

an

d



(1

/

3)



η

E

 



 

Shear Data-mVROC

t=-40ms

t=-10ms

t=20ms

t=50ms

t=80ms

t=-50ms

CaBER Data-Extensional Viscosity

10

−1



10

0

10



1

10

2



10

3

10



4

10

5



10

−1

10



0

˙ε,


3 ˙γ [s


1

]



η

an

d



(1

/

3)



η

E

 



 

Shear Viscosity FENE-P Model

Extensional Viscosity FENE-P Model

10

−1



10

0

10



1

10

2



10

3

10



4

10

5



10

−1

10



0

˙ε,


3 ˙γ [s


1

]



η

an

d



(1

/

3)



η

E

 



 

η

0



= 0.1 Pa.s

η

s

= 0.03 Pa.s

L

= 3.8


τ

= 0.01 s



FENE-P Model Parameters:

(both shear and extensional)

10

−1



10

0

10



1

10

2



10

3

10



4

10

5



10

−1

10



0

˙ε,


3 ˙γ [s


1

]



η

an

d



(1

/

3)



η

E

 



 

 

1



3

η

E

(at

ε



= ∞) =

η

0



+

2

3



η

p

L

2

Shear Extensional Viscosity for a Paint Resin



FENE Dumbbell Theory vs. Experiment

B. Keshavarz, GHM; Biomicrofluidics 2015



Where do all these different Techniques Sit!

• 

Transient extensional rheology spans a wide range of strains and strain rates: 



• 

No one device can cover whole parameter space; different rheometers for different ranges  

52

V. Sharma, GHM et al., Soft Matter



11

 (2015) 


Keshavarz & GHM; Biomicrofluidics

10

 (2106)  

For waterborne paints (HEC solutions) 


53

Summary!


•  A number of well-characterized instruments now exist for performing 

measurements of transient extensional rheometry for fluids spanning range from 

dilute solution to the melt 

q



‘constant volume’ devices: e.g. FISER, CABER, Münstedt Rheometer 

q



‘constant length’ devices: e.g. EVF, SER, RME = Meissner Rheometer 

•  Understanding the kinematics imposed by the instrument and the dynamics of 

filament evolution is essential in order to extract the true material functions 



Challenges still remain: 

q



Theory for filament deformation and rupture at very high strains 

q



Measurements for ‘weakly elastic’ materials   “non-spinnable materials” 

q



Understanding and exploiting extensional viscosity on the microscale: 

R. Cohn, U. Louisville

L. Mahadevan, Harvard

0

1



2

3

10



4

10

5



10

6

strain, D



0

/D



N.  Kojic et al.


Download 283.28 Kb.

Do'stlaringiz bilan baham:




Ma'lumotlar bazasi mualliflik huquqi bilan himoyalangan ©fayllar.org 2020
ma'muriyatiga murojaat qiling