Foreign relations of the united states 1969–1976 volume XXXVII energy crisis, 1974–1980 department of state washington


Download 8.4 Mb.
Pdf ko'rish
bet10/95
Sana17.02.2017
Hajmi8.4 Mb.
1   ...   6   7   8   9   10   11   12   13   ...   95

Ingersoll

16.

Telegram From the Department of State to the Embassy in

France

1

Washington, November 12, 1974, 0225Z.



248868. Subject: Response to Giscard Initiative. For the Charge´.

1. You should transmit the following letter to Sauvagnargues:

2. Begin text: Dear Mr. Foreign Minister: I wish to thank you for

your letter of explanation on President Giscard’s proposals for a

producer-consumer conference.

2

We also appreciated the talks Mr.



Brunet had in Washington.

3

1



Source: Ford Library, National Security Adviser, Presidential Country Files for

Europe and Canada, Box 4, France—State Department Telegrams from SECSTATE–

NODIS (1). Confidential; Immediate; Nodis. Drafted by Hartman, cleared by Enders and

Sonnenfeldt, and approved by Kissinger.

2

On October 23, Sauvagnargues wrote to Kissinger: “I wanted to let you know that



the President of the Republic will mention, during his press conference tomorrow, the

problem of energy, and will propose the convening of a conference grouping a certain

number of states which produce oil and a certain number of industrial consumer states as

well as certain non-industrial consumers. The President considers that it is indispensable

to put the good will of the producing states to the test.” (National Archives, RG 59, Cen-

tral Foreign Policy Files, P820121–1459)

3

On November 1, Sauvagnargues sent a message to Kissinger, informing him that



he wanted Brunet to travel to Washington on November 3 to “make clear” the French

“point of view.” (Telegram Tosec 459/240276 to Islamabad; ibid., Central Foreign Policy

Files, D740312–0249) Kissinger responded that he was “concerned” about the French pro-

posal, in both substance and timing, in that “it was announced without any prior consul-

tation” with the United States. (Telegram Secto 363/4 from Isfahan, November 2; ibid.,

D740333–1058) Ingersoll reported that, in their November 5 meeting in Washington,

Brunet began by giving him a “‘non-paper’ explaining French reasons for calling multi-

lateral energy conference and its relationship to other aspects of an overall energy

strategy,” and in subsequent oral points went “beyond earlier French presentations and

in some cases appeared to be attempts to respond to initial US criticism.” (Telegram

Tosec 717/243012 to Rome, November 5; ibid., D740316–0548)


365-608/428-S/80010

August 1974–April 1975 71

3. As you know, we have always favored a producer-consumer di-

alogue that is well-prepared and has some prospect for a constructive

outcome. It has been our view that such an outcome requires the devel-

opment of consumer solidarity in the fields of emergency sharing, con-

servation and financial management. We have felt that these were nec-

essary ingredients and should move in parallel with the preparation of

positive proposals to put before the producers.

4. We intend to proceed with this approach in the IEA and other fo-

rums and look forward to exchanging ideas with the French Govern-

ment as well at an appropriate time when our thoughts are in more

concrete form.

5. I have read an account of your speech in the National Assembly

4

and I am disturbed by the fact that another French Foreign Minister has



once again raised the specter of condominium. I do not understand the

sensitivity to the June 22, 1973, agreement. It is never invoked or even

referred to in the terms you used by anyone other than France. This is

particularly regrettable because of the authoritative and solemn com-

ments I made at last year’s NATO Ministerial meeting in Brussels in re-

sponse to your predecessor’s statements.

5

I take little comfort in the im-



proved tone of our relations if so basic a suspicion remains and is

promoted in public. In our interdependent world, Europe has as much

or more interest in influencing American decisions as we do in influ-

encing yours. I greatly fear for all our futures if we cannot overcome

these barren philosophical disputes. We are facing a crisis in the West

where all our energies must be devoted to constructive cooperation.

Domination is not the issue; survival is.

4

The November 6 speech included a section on U.S.-Soviet relations in which the



French Foreign Minister said: “Recent history, moreover, has shown the limits of the June

22, 1973 agreement by which the United States and the USSR appear to have sought to

arrogate to themselves a kind of right to arbitrate the difficulties of others. The super

powers showed themselves powerless to prevent the outbreak of conflicts, including one

which could have, and still can, by its consequences, endanger world peace.” (Telegram

26518 from Paris, November 8; ibid., D740321–0774) The U.S.-Soviet accord to which Sau-

vagnargues referred is the Agreement on the Prevention of Nuclear War.

5

At the December 10, 1973, session, Michel Jobert said that the June 22 agreement



between the United States and the Soviet Union “was of great concern to most of the

countries represented in the Council,” and asked whether “it was necessary for this coop-

eration between two ‘adversary-partners’ automatically to take priority over consulta-

tion within the Atlantic Alliance.” Kissinger responded by accusing Jobert of misinter-

preting the agreement and then repeated its provisions for clarification. He added that

if Jobert continued to repeat his “erroneous” interpretation of the accord that it could not

be “inadvertent.” (Telegram 14640 from London, December 12, 1973; ibid., [no film

number])


365-608/428-S/80010

72 Foreign Relations, 1969–1976, Volume XXXVII

6. I am also looking forward to our discussions when we meet in

Brussels in December and later in Martinique.

6

Warm regards. Henry



A. Kissinger. End text.

7

Kissinger

6

The NATO Foreign Ministers met in Brussels December 12–13, and Ford met with



Giscard on the island of Martinique December 15–16.

7

The Embassy delivered Kissinger’s letter on November 14. (Telegram 27112 from



Paris, November 14; Ford Library, National Security Adviser, Presidential Country Files

for Europe and Canada, Box 4, France—State Department Telegrams to SECSTATE–

NODIS (1))

17.

Telegram From the Department of State to the Embassy in

West Germany

1

Washington, November 13, 1974, 0228Z.



249878. Subject: Letter to Chancellor Schmidt. For the

Ambassador.

1. Please deliver the following letter from the Secretary to Chan-

cellor Schmidt, and only repeat only to the Chancellor, the morning of

Wednesday, November 13, pointing out that the Secretary hopes for an

early reply.

2. Begin text: Dear Mr. Chancellor: President Ford has asked me to

give you our views on the next stage of cooperative efforts to deal with

the current oil crisis. I should emphasize that these views are being

passed only to you, and have been communicated to no other officials

outside the US Government.

3. From our discussions in July,

2

I know you share our concern



over the corrosive effect that strains emanating from the oil crisis can

have on the strength of the Western democracies and the Alliance. You

have contributed significantly to efforts beginning with the Wash-

ington Energy Conference to build the unity of purpose among the

1

Source: Ford Library, National Security Adviser, Presidential Country Files for



Europe and Canada, Box 6, Germany—State Department Telegrams from SECSTATE–

NODIS (1). Confidential; Niact; Immediate; Nodis. Drafted by Enders and Paul H. Boeker

(EB/IFD), cleared in EUR, and approved by Kissinger.

2

Kissinger is presumably referring to his visit to Germany July 6–8 to brief West



German officials on the Moscow Summit.

365-608/428-S/80010

August 1974–April 1975 73

major Western powers which is necessary to deal with this threat. For-

eign Minister Genscher and Finance Minister Apel have helped carry

forward this effort in the Washington meetings in September.

4. In more recent discussions in Bonn, US representatives have re-

viewed the evolving strategy for consumer country cooperation with

State Secretary Poehl, who will have reported these discussions to you.

3

I want to raise with you two elements of this strategy in particular, fi-



nancial solidarity and the organization of further discussions.

5. As you have stressed, financial cooperation is essential. We both

realize that the US and the Federal Republic would be net providers of

finance to any new recycling facility. That, of course, will mean per-

suading a potentially reluctant Congress and Bundestag. The President

has, however, come to the conclusion that the US—and almost surely

the Federal Republic—would be compelled to provide as much or

more financing to the weaker economies bilaterally if we have no new

facility. A suitably large facility would have such an effect on confi-

dence in the financial system and the creditworthiness of participating

governments that the eventual requirement for official financing would

be reduced from what it otherwise would be. The Federal Republic

should also find considerable advantage in having the strong econ-

omies of the US, Canada, and Japan join with it in a general consumer

country facility rather than relying only on a European recycling

system in which the Federal Republic alone is linked with most of the

prospective net borrowers.

6. We see financial cooperation as an essential supportive element

of a broader cooperative strategy. If all countries, the weak and the

strong, are to stick together in a program of energy sharing in emer-

gencies, conservation, and research and development of new non-

OPEC energy supplies, some will require financial support. Assuming

that the stronger economies cannot count on remaining islands of sta-

bility, it would appear in our interest to provide this support. If a con-

sumer country recycling facility is to serve its purpose, I believe it

should be convincingly sufficient to meet all contingencies. We intend

to propose a $25 billion facility of callable commitments for 1975.

7. Regarding further international discussions, I feel that the

meetings of the Five have now progressed to the stage where the pro-

posals they have considered and developed should be presented to a

broader group of industrial countries. We suggest that we develop the

programs on conservation and new supplies in the International En-

ergy Agency and the recycling proposal in the Group of Ten. I also in-

3

According to telegram 14398 from Tokyo, November 6, Enders and Cooper were



scheduled to meet with Poehl and Lautenschlager on the morning of November 8 in

Bonn before returning to the United States. (National Archives, RG 59, Central Foreign

Policy Files, D740318–0715) No other record of the meeting has been found.


365-608/428-S/80010

74 Foreign Relations, 1969–1976, Volume XXXVII

tend to propose a January meeting of participating countries in these

efforts, at the Ministerial level, to take the political decisions to put both

into effect. Such a meeting of Ministers could conveniently convene in

Washington in mid January just prior to the meeting of the IMF’s In-

terim Committee of Governors.

8. We all will have political problems with a program of the magni-

tude we propose, but the magnitude is a reflection of the problem we

face. In both our countries we will undoubtedly encounter critics who

find it momentarily cheaper and safer to wait for miracles. But I suspect

that you share my view that the oil price is not coming down now on its

own and will not come down later unless we act now to create the ob-

jective conditions that will eventually accomplish this.

9. President Ford has asked me to advance some of these proposals

in a speech I am giving November 14 in Chicago.

4

At that time I also in-



tend to say that we will attend a producer/consumer meeting, while

stating that such a meeting should await action by consumers on the

cooperative program we have begun.

10. We hope that you can support these suggestions which were in

part generated by the concerns you expressed in June. If you have any

urgent views prior to my speech we would be glad to consider them.

11. Warm regards, Henry A. Kissinger. End text.

5

Kissinger

4

In the speech that he gave in Chicago on November 14 before a University of Chi-



cago Board of Trustees banquet, Kissinger provided a “Blueprint for Consumer Coopera-

tion” in which the consuming countries “must act in five interrelated areas”: 1) acceler-

ating “our national programs of energy conservation” and coordinating them “to insure

their effectiveness”; 2) pressing on with the “development of new supplies of oil and al-

ternative sources of energy”; 3) strengthening “economic security—to protect against oil

emergencies and to safeguard the international financial system”; 4) assisting the “poor

nations whose hopes and efforts for progress have been cruelly blunted by the oil price

rises of the past year”; and 5) entering into a “dialogue with the producers to establish a

fair and durable long-term relationship” on the “basis of consumer solidarity.” For the

text of the speech, see Department of State Bulletin, December 2, 1974, pp. 749–756.

5

According to telegram 17793 from Bonn, November 13, Schmidt told Deputy



Chief of Mission Frank E. Cash that because he had not had time to consult with his Cab-

inet, he could not “do much more than give off-the-cuff reaction” to Kissinger’s letter.

The Chancellor believed that the proposal for a January meeting would lead to a “con-

frontation with the French” and, therefore, was “not a good idea,” adding that Giscard’s

proposal was “not unnecessary.” On financing, Schmidt was “not quite sure” that West

Germany “would be compelled to provide financing to degree indicated” in Kissinger’s

letter and that public mention of the “big fund” project discussed in both the G–5 and the

Library Group forums would put his country in a “very difficult spot.” Finally, he “fully

agreed” on the “necessity of sticking together in energy sharing, conservation, and re-

search and development of new non-OPEC energy supplies” and that, if the industrial-

ized powers could not achieve “essential cooperation” on energy, the consequences

would be “very bad.” (Ford Library, National Security Adviser, Presidential Country

Files for Europe and Canada, Box 6, Germany—State Department Telegrams from

SECSTATE–NODIS (1))



365-608/428-S/80010

August 1974–April 1975 75



18.

Telegram From the Department of State to the Embassies in

Japan, the United Kingdom, and France

1

Washington, November 14, 1974, 0554Z.



250994. Subject: Letter From Secretary to Foreign Minister.

1. Please deliver the following letter to the Foreign Minister not be-

fore 5:00 PM local time Thursday, November 14 in Europe, and as early

as possible during the business day in Japan, Friday, November 15.

2

The Secretary’s speech referred to in this letter will be delivered



Thursday, November 14 in Chicago at 9:25 PM local time.

3

You should



ask that the Secretary’s letter be held in strictest confidence until he de-

livers the speech.

2. Dear Mr. Minister: The effects of the energy crisis have now be-

come manifest—in more rapid inflation, arrested growth, increasing

strains on the international financial system and narrowing opportu-

nities for governments to control their countries’ own political and eco-

nomic destiny. This relentless course of events lends new urgency to

our joint efforts to design and carry out an effective strategy to over-

come the problems emanating from the energy crisis.

3. The USG believes that the conclusion is inescapable that cooper-

ation among the major oil consuming areas of Europe, North America

and Japan is the fundamental prerequisite for an effective program of

action. The crisis itself defies national solutions. But working together

we do have options which we do not have separately. Whereas no

country alone, except possibly the United States, can protect itself in a

selective embargo, together we can do so.

4. We now need to move further in the cooperative endeavors

begun this year at the Washington Energy Conference and carried for-

ward in subsequent deliberations. Our work has now progressed to the

stage where we should advance some of the proposals we have been

considering among the Five to the broader group of countries that will

need to act on them. As a part of this process, I intend to present some

U.S. proposals in a speech on the evening of November 14 in Chicago. I

want to share with you some of the reasoning behind these proposals,

as well as the nature of the proposals themselves, although our general

thoughts are already familiar to you.

1

Source: Ford Library, National Security Adviser, Presidential Country Files for



East Asia and the Pacific, Box 8, Japan—State Department Telegrams from SECSTATE–

NODIS (1). Secret; Niact; Immediate; Nodis. Drafted by Boeker; cleared by Hartman,

Enders, and Habib; and approved by Eagleburger.

2

Kissinger sent the same letter to Genscher on November 14. (Telegram 250993 to



Bonn; ibid., Presidential Country Files for Europe and Canada, Box 6, Germany—State

Department Telegrams from SECSTATE–NODIS (1))

3

See footnote 4, Document 17.



365-608/428-S/80010

76 Foreign Relations, 1969–1976, Volume XXXVII

5. On the important question of oil price, the producers have made

it clear that political persuasion or negotiation is not now going to re-

sult in any notable price decrease. The alternative left us is, therefore,

the difficult but workable one of action on the consumer side (1) to

create the objective conditions for an eventual price reduction, and (2)

to protect the vitality of our economies in the interim period of high oil

prices. To achieve the first objective consuming countries need major

new efforts both to reduce demand for oil through conservation and to

develop new sources of energy supply. In the period until these actions

reach full effectiveness consuming countries, as we have recognized,

need to complete two safety nets, one to deal with any new oil supply

emergency and the other to deal with any potential inability of the fi-

nancial system to recycle the huge flow of oil funds.

6. Energy conservation offers us the most immediate prospect of

relief from high oil prices. For political as well as economic reasons ef-

fective conservation must be a collective effort. At a minimum we

should collate our individual country programs for 1975 to make sure

that we are doing enough. The U.S. will propose that the industrialized

countries set the goal of reducing their consumption from what it oth-

erwise would have been by three million barrels per day (150 million

tons at an annual rate) by the end of 1975. The United States has already

announced a program to reduce our consumption of imported oil by

one million barrels per day in 1975. In the context of a common goal of

consuming countries, the United States is prepared to achieve further

savings.

7. In dealing with recycling of oil funds, we need to consider three

basic objectives: to protect the integrity of our financial institutions, to

ensure that no nation feels forced to pursue disruptive policies for lack

of adequate finance and to make sure no consuming country is com-

pelled to accept financing on intolerable political and economic terms.

The task for governments is to provide a back-up, intergovernmental

facility that can augment private recycling whenever necessary. Such a

safety net would help assure the stability of the entire system and the

creditworthiness of participating governments.

8. With these considerations in mind the United States is pro-

posing that the industrialized countries create a common loan and

guaranty facility to provide a means for recycling up to $25 billion in

1975. Governments would individually choose how to meet their com-

mitments to such a facility, but presumably most would choose to do so

by borrowing. Calls on governments’ commitments to provide funds to

the facility would be made in connection with specific decisions of par-

ticipating governments on support to countries in need of financing,

after full resort to private opportunities and reasonable self-help

measures.

9. We are already considering new ways of assisting developing

countries in their acute financial problems. We need to consider new



365-608/428-S/80010

August 1974–April 1975 77

possibilities of providing highly concessional financing to the devel-

oping countries most seriously hurt by the current crisis. In particular,

special financing of the IMF needs to be provided on terms more suit-

able to these countries’ needs.

10. As you know, the US has always been in favor of a constructive

dialogue with oil producing countries. Consumer country cooperation

is not antagonistic to consumer-producer cooperation, but an essential

preparation for this broader dialogue.

11. The USG hopes that consuming countries can move promptly

to broaden our cooperative effort. The new International Energy

Agency is best placed to develop a program of action on conservation,

new supplies and preparation of consumer positions for the eventual

consumer-producer dialogue. We suggest that the Group of 10 Finance

Ministers develop a proposal for financial cooperation looking to enact-

ment within the OECD framework.

12. The issues and tasks before us comprise a program of consider-

able magnitude, requiring difficult political decisions. But just as the

turmoil of the immediate post-war period became a moment of great

creation in international cooperation, so can the energy crisis of today

be one leading to historic achievement through cooperation. The eco-

nomic facts of today are stark, as they were in 1947–1948. The structure

emerging from that challenge has secured our democratic institutions,

economic progress and security for a generation. These achievements

are now threatened. But with the same political vision, courage, and

above all, cooperation that sustained us in the earlier years, we can

meet the new energy challenge.

13. I look forward to working with you on these tasks in the period

immediately ahead, and hope that we can count on your support and

that of your government for the proposals we have made.

Signed Henry A. Kissinger.

14. For Paris: Final sentence of letter should end with words “im-

mediately ahead”, eliminating all thereafter from “and hope” through

“we have made.”

4


Download 8.4 Mb.

Do'stlaringiz bilan baham:
1   ...   6   7   8   9   10   11   12   13   ...   95




Ma'lumotlar bazasi mualliflik huquqi bilan himoyalangan ©fayllar.org 2020
ma'muriyatiga murojaat qiling