Foreign relations of the united states 1969–1976 volume XXXVII energy crisis, 1974–1980 department of state washington


Download 8.4 Mb.
Pdf ko'rish
bet14/95
Sana17.02.2017
Hajmi8.4 Mb.
1   ...   10   11   12   13   14   15   16   17   ...   95

Kissinger

29.

Memorandum From Director of Central Intelligence Colby to

the President’s Assistant for National Security Affairs

(Kissinger)

Washington, January 2, 1975.

[Source: Ford Library, National Security Adviser, Kissinger–

Scowcroft West Wing Office Files, Box 22, Saudi Arabia (1). Secret; Sen-

sitive. 5 pages not declassified.]

30.

Editorial Note

On January 3, 1975, The New York Times reported that Secretary of

State Henry Kissinger, in an interview with Business Week magazine

shortly before Christmas, said that he could not rule out the use of force

against oil-producing nations. He made clear, however, that such ac-

tion “would be considered only in the gravest emergency.” “I am not

saying that there’s no circumstances where we would not use force,” he

said, “but it is one thing to use it in the case of a dispute over price; it’s

another where there is some actual strangulation of the industrialized

world.” Asked about the interview, Kissinger remarked: “I have said it

would not come to that point, and that the oil problem would be dealt

with by other methods,” but he reiterated that “there’s no circum-

stances where we would not use force.” The December 23 Business Week

interview was reprinted in Department of State Bulletin, January 27,

1975, pp. 97–106.

The Embassy in Saudi Arabia reported that King Faisal and the

Saudi Government were “disturbed” by the “threatening implications”

of the statements that Kissinger made during the Business Week inter-

view. A Royal adviser told Ambassador James Akins: “This represents

a complete change in American policy and we must therefore revise



365-608/428-S/80010

August 1974–April 1975 109

our own policy toward the United States.” Akins responded that there

was “no change” in U.S. policy and that he “had made the same state-

ments” himself in a Foreign Affairs article 2 years before. He also re-

minded the adviser that he had declared, both publicly in the United

States and privately in Saudi Arabia, that “invasion would be madness

but when countries are reduced to desperation they take ‘mad’ ac-

tions.” To help alleviate Saudi concerns, Akins requested additional in-

formation from the Department or a message from the Secretary. (Tele-

gram 32 from Jidda, January 4; National Archives, RG 59, Central

Foreign Policy Files, D750004–0636)

The Ambassador sent another telegram the following day in-

forming the Department that Minister of Petroleum Sheikh Ahmad

Yamani told him that the King was “depressed and worried by ‘Amer-

ican threats’ against Saudi Arabia.” Yamani also said that he had never

seen the King “so worried and so questioning of his relationship with

the United States.” Later that day, the King himself told Akins that he

was “extremely disturbed” by the “series of ‘American threats’ against

Saudi Arabia” that culminated in the Business Week interview. As for

the prospect of occupying the Saudi oil fields, Yamani said that doing

so would be “very difficult,” that the fields could be “sabotaged

easily,” that a “‘quick surgical operation’ would be impossible,” and

that the result would be the “loss of Saudi production for years.” Akins

believed, however, that Saudi officials would “calm down” once they

digested the Arabic translation of the complete text of Kissinger’s state-

ments. That said, he also thought that the Kingdom would be “stirred

up again” when the next newspaper or magazine article reported that

the United States proposed occupying Saudi Arabia or any other

oil-producing country. (Telegram 67 from Jidda, January 5; ibid.,

D750004–0773)

On January 8, the Department instructed Akins to tell the Saudi

Government that the question about military action “arose with spe-

cific relation to oil prices,” and that the Secretary “made it clear that we

did not consider military action to be an appropriate response to oil

prices.” The Department also instructed the Ambassador to point out

that the question itself was a hypothetical one regarding a “deliberate

attempt” by oil producers to “strangle the industrialized world”—the

“gravest emergency”—which Kissinger said did not apply to the

“present situation,” adding that he “did not foresee such a situation

arising.” The Department told Akins to point out that Kissinger never

mentioned the possibility of an invasion of Saudi Arabia in particular,

and that he had highlighted the “importance of maintaining the rela-

tionship of friendship between Saudi Arabia and the US.” (Telegram

1955 to Jidda; ibid., D750004–0717)

Kissinger replied personally in a note to Prince Sultan regarding

the Business Week interview (telegram 7266 to Jidda, January 11; ibid.,


365-608/428-S/80010

110 Foreign Relations, 1969–1976, Volume XXXVII

P850106–2309), a gesture for which the Prince expressed “deep appreci-

ation.” Sultan also said that he hoped that the Secretary’s note, and a

similar note from President Ford to King Faisal (telegram 7265 to Jidda,

January 11; ibid., P850106–2304) would result in “calming passions” in

other Arab capitals. (Telegram 283 from Jidda, January 14; Ford Li-

brary, National Security Adviser, Presidential Country Files for Middle

East and South Asia, Box 29, Saudi Arabia—State Department Tele-

grams to SECSTATE–NODIS (3))

Although U.S.-Saudi tensions over the interview had dissipated by

mid-January, Yamani warned Akins that the Saudi National Guard

“had orders to prepare to blow up certain sensitive sections of the

Saudi oil fields and to fire certain wells should there be concrete plans

to invade and occupy them.” Yamani added that “there had been

inter-Arab discussion on the matter and any invasion would be fol-

lowed by cutoff of all Arab oil.” (Telegram 251 from Jidda, January 13;

ibid., P850106–2311)



31.

Telegram From the Department of State to the Embassies in

the OPEC Capitals

1

Washington, January 13, 1975, 1757Z.



7457. Subject: Secretary’s Message to OPEC Governments. Ref:

Doha 0021 (Notal); Abu Dhabi 0047 (Notal).

2

Beirut pass Baghdad for



action.

1

Source: National Archives, RG 59, Central Foreign Policy Files, D750013–0012.



Confidential; Exdis. Drafted by George Q. Lumsden (NEA/ARP); cleared by Katz and in

NEA, EB, ARA, and EUR; and approved by Sisco. Sent to Abu Dhabi, Doha, Tripoli, Bei-

rut, and Quito, and repeated to Algiers, Caracas, Jakarta, Jidda, Kuwait, Lagos, and

Tehran.


2

In telegram 21 from Doha, the Embassy reported that Issa Kawari, Qatar Minister

of Information, Chief of the Emir’s Office, and Acting Foreign Minister, asked “about

press reports that Secretary had sent letters to five oil producing countries concerning

proposed producer/consumer conference” and “expressed personal disappointment

that Qatar did not rpt not receive letter.” (Ibid., D750006–0211) In telegram 47 from Abu

Dhabi, the Embassy reported increasing concern that the Department was “not doing

enough to give UAEG timely briefings” on “developments in U.S. policy that are of vital

concern” to the UAE. The Embassy also requested “guidance which could become basis

for oral briefing” to the Ministers of Petroleum and Foreign Affairs. (Ibid., D750007–0654)



365-608/428-S/80010

August 1974–April 1975 111

1. On Dec 24, Secretary sent letters to seven OPEC governments

3

(those listed as info addressees to this cable) which included outline of



possible timetable and approach to multilateral producer/consumer

conference. This proposal stemmed from agreement reached between

Presidents Ford and Giscard d’Estaing during their Dec 14–16 meetings

in Martinique. Secretary has, since that time, sent no rpt no subsequent

messages on this subject to other OPEC governments. (N.B. At its dis-

cretion, Embassy Doha may wish to set record straight with Kawari:

neither Qatar nor UAE was an original recipient of Secretary’s letter.)

2. However, as result attention media have given Secretary’s mes-

sage and in awareness of sensitivities of other OPEC states such as

those noted in reftels, action addressees are, at their discretion, author-

ized to make oral approach to their host governments at appropriately

high level and to leave following aide-me´moire:

3. Following standard opening: “Ever since the start of the energy

crisis and the Washington Energy Conference, many governments, in-

cluding the United States, have felt that it would be useful at the right

time and with the right preparations to supplement the intensive bilat-

eral consultations that now exist between oil producing and oil con-

suming countries with some form of multilateral dialogue.

4. “Recent discussions between the United States and France in

Martinique resulted in an agreement on a possible timetable and ap-

proach to such multilateral contacts, a proposal which has now been

endorsed by the members of the International Energy Agency. Under

this approach there would be a four phase schedule: first, basic deci-

sions by the consumers on conservation, development of new sources

of energy and financial solidarity; second, a meeting among repre-

sentatives of producers and consumers to discuss the procedures and

agenda for a conference; third, intensive preparation of common posi-

tions for that conference; and fourth, the conference itself.

5. “Particular stress has been placed on the need for major energy

and financial decisions by the consuming countries in advance of the

proposed conference because a failed conference would be seriously

detrimental to all, consumers and producers alike. That is also a view

expressed by many representatives of producing countries, who have

repeatedly stressed the importance of conservation of energy, the de-

velopment of new sources, and financial stabilization.

6. “Although preparation among consumers is thus necessary in

advance, it should be stressed that the objective is cooperation, not con-

frontation. It is not intended that all contacts between producers and

consumers be conducted as a bloc to bloc dialogue. On the contrary, the

3

See Document 27.



365-608/428-S/80010

112 Foreign Relations, 1969–1976, Volume XXXVII

United States would like to strengthen its bilateral contacts with oil

producing governments over the coming months so that cooperative

efforts to solve the international oil crisis can be made more effective.

7. “President Ford is now completing a series of major decisions on

domestic energy policy. These decisions will be announced in January.

They are expected to make a significant contribution to the solution of

the world energy problem.

8. “Over the coming months, the Government of the United States

looks forward to keeping in close contact on these issues with the gov-

ernments of OPEC states.” Complimentary close.

9. Please report host government reactions.

Kissinger

32.

Minutes of Washington Special Actions Group Meeting

1

Washington, January 14, 1975, 10:42 a.m.–noon.



SUBJECT

Middle East

PARTICIPANTS

Chairman—Henry A. Kissinger



State

CIA

Robert Ingersoll

William Colby

DOD

NSC

William Clements

Lt. Gen. Brent Scowcroft

Jeanne W. Davis



JCS

Gen. George S. Brown

[Omitted here is discussion unrelated to oil. For this first portion of

the minutes, see Foreign Relations, 1969–1976, volume XXVI, Arab-

Israeli Dispute, August 1974–December 1976, Document 126.]

[Secretary Kissinger:] We need a contingency assessment of what

happens in an Israeli-Arab war if the Russians want to play it rough.

Have the Russians the capability of launching missiles with high explo-

1

Source: Ford Library, National Security Council, Institutional Files, Box 24, WSAG



Meeting Minutes, January 1975. Top Secret; Sensitive; Codeword. The meeting took place

in the White House Situation Room.



365-608/428-S/80010

August 1974–April 1975 113

sive warheads from Syrian territory? Suppose they wanted to raise the

ante during a war?

Mr. Colby: They could.

Secretary Kissinger: The Russians have never played up to their

full capability in a crisis. Suppose they do.

Mr. Clements: The Israelis, after they have had time to think about

it, wouldn’t be too excited about F-4s in Saudi Arabia. They would be a

stabilizing influence. It’s possible the Russians would move into Iraq.

The most excited person would be the Shah.

Secretary Kissinger: The Shah may not like it, but he is manage-

able. He’s nothing like the Israelis.

Mr. Clements: I think the Shah would go up the wall.

Mr. Colby: The Shah would think he could control the situation

through us.

Secretary Kissinger: Bill’s (Clements) argument might carry

weight with the Shah but not the Israelis. There would be no chance of

selling it to them, but that doesn’t mean we shouldn’t consider doing it.

If we face the total oil embargo of the West, we have to have a plan to

use force. I’m not saying we have to take over Saudi Arabia. How about

Abu Dhabi, or Libya?

Mr. Clements: We want to get you over to the JCS think tank.

[2 lines not declassified]

Gen. Brown: [1 line not declassified]

Secretary Kissinger: You’d have trouble convincing Faisal.

Mr. Colby: He doesn’t have to know.

Secretary Kissinger: I was joking. Faisal would be thrilled by F-4s.

Mr. Clements: We can do it [less than line not declassified].

Secretary Kissinger: Maybe. Why not Abu Dhabi?

Mr. Clements: They have no reserves and no production facilities.

Mr. Colby: You’re talking about providing oil to Europe and

Japan, not the US.

Mr. Clements: [1 line not declassified]

Mr. Ingersoll: Iran has a lot.

Mr. Clements: That’s a different horse.

Secretary Kissinger: We’re talking about something that hopefully

won’t last more than six months to a year. If we assume that Iranian

supplies would continue and we concentrate on one country, which

one should it be?

Mr. Clements: Saudi Arabia.

Mr. Colby: [2 lines not declassified]

Mr. Clements: [2 lines not declassified]


365-608/428-S/80010

114 Foreign Relations, 1969–1976, Volume XXXVII

Mr. Ingersoll: How long would it take to restore the facilities if

they were destroyed?

Mr. Colby: Three months.

Secretary Kissinger: They won’t destroy them.

Mr. Ingersoll: Did you see the Yamani telegram?

2

Secretary Kissinger: Yamani has the Americans psyched.



Mr. Colby: It could isolate Saudi Arabia from the Arabs.

Secretary Kissinger: (to Mr. Clements) I’ll come over and look at

your material. (to Gen. Scowcroft) Arrange it for next week.

Mr. Colby: May I come?

Mr. Clements: Sure.

Secretary Kissinger: We will have to have an NSC meeting on that

subject.

Mr. Colby: When? I would like to get the Russian estimate done

before the meeting.

Secretary Kissinger: Can you get it done by the end of next week.

We won’t have an NSC meeting for two weeks.

Mr. Colby: We can try.

Mr. Clements: (to Secretary Kissinger) I need to talk to you about

POL. We’re roughly 10 million barrels short in our storage facilities. We

have located plus or minus 18 million barrels of storage scattered

around in the Mediterranean, Singapore, etc. It is strategically located

and we can rent it on a short-term lease for about a year. We need badly

to get those filled.

Secretary Kissinger: How much are we down?

Mr. Clements: Our normal storage is 93 million barrels—we have

83 million. We have never recovered to the pre-hostilities rate.

Secretary Kissinger: What will it cost to fill them up?

Mr. Clements: Plenty; around $350 million. We need to ask the

Congress for it. We have to make them understand the possibilities and

their responsibilities.

Secretary Kissinger: I will raise it with the President tomorrow

morning.

Mr. Clements: Great.

2

Presumably telegram 251 from Jidda; see Document 30.



365-608/428-S/80010

August 1974–April 1975 115



33.

Telegram From the Department of State to the Embassy in

France

1

Washington, January 15, 1975, 0512Z.



9370. Subject: Presidential Letter. For the Ambassador. Please de-

liver the following letter from President Ford to President Giscard

d’Estaing at the earliest opportunity on January 15 and in any event

prior to noon Washington time.

2

Begin text

Dear Mr. President:

This Wednesday, in my State of the Union Address, I will formally

present policies to meet the economic and energy challenges which are

of major importance to the United States and to the international com-

munity.


3

I shall, at that time, make a number of detailed proposals,

many of which I outlined in my speech to the American people on

Monday night.

4

I write you in the spirit of collaboration that animates



our relations to share my thoughts on these new measures.

Our countries and our key trading partners have recently been

struggling with unemployment, inflation, and energy shortages. There

are, as we know, no easy answers to any of these problems, singly or in

combination, but it is clear that we cannot afford to address one aspect

of our difficulties while ignoring the others. Moreover, each country

must act to achieve a balance consistent with its priorities and its partic-

ular economic circumstances while recognizing it must act in a manner

which furthers rather than harms the economic well-being of other

countries.

My policies aim to deal directly with the economic slowdown we

now face without triggering the major inflationary pressures which

might result from an overly expansionary policy. A tax cut, along with

measures to stimulate investment, should reinvigorate the U.S.

economy and improve confidence. Under present conditions we be-

lieve it will not restimulate the inflationary spiral.

1

Source: National Archives, RG 59, Central Foreign Policy Files, P840083–0869. Se-



cret; Niact; Immediate; Nodis; Cherokee. Drafted in the White House.

2

In telegram 1131 from Paris, January 15, the Embassy reported that, since Giscard



was at a Council of Ministers meeting all morning, Ford’s letter was delivered to the

Deputy Secretary General. (Ibid., P850038–2604)

3

The text of the address, which the President delivered on January 15, is in Public



Papers of the Presidents of the United States: Gerald R. Ford, 1975

, pp. 36–46. The President

followed up the speech by sending “an omnibus energy bill,” the 13-part Energy Inde-

pendence Act of 1975, to Congress on January 30. See ibid., pp. 136–138.

4

On January 13, President Ford addressed the nation on his programs to address



the nation’s economic problems and the energy crisis. See ibid., pp. 30–35.

365-608/428-S/80010

116 Foreign Relations, 1969–1976, Volume XXXVII

We are also taking major steps to reduce our dependence on im-

ported oil. We are determined to reduce oil imports promptly and sig-

nificantly and to end vulnerability to economic disruption by foreign

suppliers by 1985. Immediate actions to cut energy imports and to in-

crease both our domestic supplies and our ability to use our coal, gas,

oil and nuclear power are clearly necessary as are strong measures to

ensure adequate conservation and a new emergency storage program.

[illegible text] make new demands on the American people. [illegible

text] time, they provide the basis for a stronger U.S. economy in the fu-

ture. This, in turn, should have a beneficial impact on the international

economy.

In closing, let me emphasize the importance I have attached to

having had the benefit of your views on these issues during our

meeting in Martinique. We are strongly committed to working with

your government and others in confronting our common problems.

While much remains to be done, we are encouraged by the positive

steps which have been taken recently. For our mutual well-being, it is

imperative that we continue developing a common approach in

dealing with energy problems and that we continue to coordinate

closely in confronting our economic difficulties.

I look forward to staying in close touch with you on these impor-

tant issues.

5

Sincerely, Gerald R. Ford



His Excellency Valery Giscard d’Estaing

President of the French Republic

Paris

End text.

Kissinger

5

Ford sent the same letter to Schmidt and Wilson. (Telegram 9369 to Bonn, January



15; National Archives, RG 59, Central Foreign Policy Files, P850014–1483 and telegram

9371 to London, January 15; ibid., P840083–0885)



365-608/428-S/80010

August 1974–April 1975 117



34.

Memorandum From Robert Oakley of the National Security

Council Staff to Secretary of State Kissinger

1

Washington, January 20, 1975.



SUBJECT

Economic Impact of Mid East Crisis—A WSAG Issue and Need for Formal

Follow-Up

One of the issues on the approved agenda for last week’s WSAG

meeting on the Middle East

2

was the whole realm of possible economic



ramifications of a new Middle East crisis and what steps could be taken

to minimize the effects of Arab action in the economic (oil) sphere.

In the absence of in-depth discussion of this issue at the WSAG,

Deputy Secretary of State Ingersoll and Deputy Secretary of Defense

Clements both believe that some form of follow-up action is necessary.

Deputy Secretary Ingersoll has asked NEA (at Tab A)

3

to take the



lead in a follow-up study and to involve EB, S/P and other agencies

such as CIA and Treasury. I see two problems with this approach:

(a) There is no mention of involving NSC or DOD; (b) Treasury was not

involved in the WSAG exercise.

Deputy Secretary Clements (at Tab B)

4

has suggested that you re-



quest appropriate agencies to address the economic issues or that the

NSC lead a study which would involve all of the relevant agencies. Cle-

ments’ letter also contains some constructive observations on the vari-

ous substantive issues.

1

Source: Ford Library, National Security Adviser, “Outside the System” Chrono-



logical Files, Box 1, 1/10/75–1/21/75. Secret; Nodis; Sensitive. Sent for action. Colonel

Clinton E. Granger of the NSC Staff concurred. Sent through Scowcroft.

2

See Document 32.



3

Not attached. Ingersoll asked for a follow-up study to consider “what the Arabs

could do with regards to oil prices,” a boycott, and “the manipulation of their financial

holdings abroad.” He requested that the study examine “the effects such actions could

have on the U.S. and other countries, what we could do about such moves, and the steps

we need to take to prepare for such a crisis.” (Memorandum from Pendleton to Atherton,

Enders, and Lord, January 16; Ford Library, National Security Adviser, “Outside the

System” Chronological Files, Box 1, 1/10/75–1/21/75)

4

Not attached. Clements sought to explore the “possible economic measures, short



of war, that might be utilized to ease the economic/financial situation arising before or

during an Arab oil embargo.” He explained that such measures “might be designed to:

1) Make an Arab oil embargo less likely; 2) Limit its scope; and 3) Limit its effects, should

it occur.” Attached to Clements’s memorandum is a Department of Defense background

paper that outlines the “economic options available to the U.S., Western Europe, and

Japan” that would help achieve the three goals Clements listed. He concluded that such

options “would be most effective if taken long before an embargo begins and would also

greatly increase the effectiveness of other U.S. and allied options after an embargo is im-

posed.” (Ibid.)


365-608/428-S/80010

118 Foreign Relations, 1969–1976, Volume XXXVII

In view of the interest in and the importance and sensitivity of this

issue, you may wish to recommend that the NSC chair an inter-agency

study on the economic issues of a possible Middle East conflict, as a

follow-up to the WSAG meeting. Alternatively, you could have such a

study done by the Under Secretaries Committee. In either case, the

study should be completed within three weeks’ time. In the interim, no

action should be taken on various contingency measures without your

explicit approval.

We assume that State, NSC, DOD and CIA—the original WSAG

participants—should be involved in this matter. You may or may not

wish to include Treasury or the Federal Energy Agency in this particu-

lar follow-on study.



Recommendation:

That you agree to a formal follow-on study on the

economic aspects of a Mid East conflict by indicating your preference

for the following:

5

Agree with study under the USC



Agree with study chaired by NSC in inter-agency framework

Prefer original WSAG participants only

Add Treasury

Add FEA


5

Kissinger checked the second and fourth options.



Download 8.4 Mb.

Do'stlaringiz bilan baham:
1   ...   10   11   12   13   14   15   16   17   ...   95




Ma'lumotlar bazasi mualliflik huquqi bilan himoyalangan ©fayllar.org 2020
ma'muriyatiga murojaat qiling