Foreign relations of the united states 1969–1976 volume XXXVII energy crisis, 1974–1980 department of state washington


Memorandum for the 40 Committee


Download 8.4 Mb.
Pdf ko'rish
bet15/95
Sana17.02.2017
Hajmi8.4 Mb.
1   ...   11   12   13   14   15   16   17   18   ...   95

35.

Memorandum for the 40 Committee

Washington, January 21, 1975.

[Source: National Security Council, Ford Intelligence Files, Subject

Files, Box M–2/I012, Saudi Arabia, 24 October 1974–21 January 1975,

Secret; Sensitive. 6 pages not declassified]


365-608/428-S/80010

August 1974–April 1975 119



36.

Memorandum From Robert Hormats and Robert Oakley of

the National Security Council Staff to Secretary of State

Kissinger

1

Washington, January 23, 1975.



SUBJECT

Consumer/Producer Dialogue

You have had considerable success to date in persuading the con-

sumers to go along with our policies on international energy and recy-

cling matters. However, pressures are building which could lead to di-

visions among the consumers. These could jeopardize our ability to get

the essentials of what we want in the way of consumer policies and

consumer solidarity.

—Concern in Europe that, because of differences between the

Congress and the Executive Branch and serious domestic economic

problems, the United States will be unable to deliver on its commit-

ments, e.g., the “financial safety net.”

—A growing number of bilateral deals between oil producers and

individual European countries (France, the UK, Germany and Italy).

Some of these involve the sale of oil at below market prices. Such ar-

rangements dilute enthusiasm for consumer cooperation and hold out

the hope that the oil producers have a greater ability and will to aid

Western Europe than does the US.

—The progressive weakening of the economies of Western Europe

raising the prospects of new trade barriers, or other “beggar-

thy-neighbor” policies, which will further weaken consumer

cooperation.

—An increase in producer pressure on certain consumers, ex-

pressly designed to counter what the producers perceive as a United

States wish to somehow “break” the producer position by trying to

delay consumer-producer dialogue while we build up enough con-

sumer solidarity for a successful confrontation with the producers.

(This perception stems from several factors: our overall lack of enthu-

siasm about a producer-consumer conference, our lack of progress in

beginning a serious bilateral dialogue with the producers on economic

problems other than price; what is misunderstood as our threats to use

military force, and the impression given in the Joint Commissions that

1

Source: Ford Library, National Security Adviser, Presidential Subject File, Box 4,



Energy (5). No classification marking. Sent for information. At the top of the page, Kissin-

ger wrote: “Want to have oil group meeting, Burns, Simon, Robinson, Enders, early in the

week. Want to discuss this paper which is good.”


365-608/428-S/80010

120 Foreign Relations, 1969–1976, Volume XXXVII

we are stalling and do not want to get down to effecting specific

projects.) We have reports of Saudi and Iranian operations with Italy,

the UK and other countries where there is a clear link between large

loans and other financial benefits from the producers and sympathetic

policies from the consumers.

To counter these trends before they pose a serious threat to our

economic strategy and before they begin to raise questions about our

basic political relationship in the minds of leaders like the Shah and

King Faisal, we suggest that the United States:

—Begin right away a series of bilateral talks at high levels with key

producer governments (Iran, Saudi Arabia, Algeria, Kuwait, Nigeria

and Venezuela) in order to have in-depth exchanges on the major

themes outlined below. This would be in keeping with what you have

already arranged between Shultz and the Shah and with the visit by a

“senior colleague” to Algiers. If at all possible, these talks should take

place prior to the OPEC “summit” in Algiers in mid-February.

2

—Shift the immediate emphasis of our discussions with the pro-



ducers from price to financial issues (without abandoning pressures for

a lower price). Whether or not the price of oil is lowered, recycling

poses massive problems, as does the large-scale transfer of resources to

producers. While the producers feel compelled to maintain unity of

price, they are far from unified on financial matters. We would have the

opportunity to wean the moderates from the radicals on this issue.

Saudi and Iranian acceptance of suggestions for a scheme of delayed oil

payments (e.g., 75% now, 25% later) with a low interest rate and a long

repayment period on the unpaid portion would effectively lower the

oil price by nearly 25%. Both countries could do this without appearing

to “break” the cartel.

—Begin to develop a strategy of rewards and punishments to ca-

jole countries into producing more oil and, therefore, to put downward

pressure on price. There is presently over 7 million barrels of “shut-in”

oil capacity. Foreign exchange needs have already forced countries like

Ecuador to increase pumping. A selective World Bank voting policy

and Ex-Im lending policy to restrict loans to those countries with exces-

sive shut-in policy would provide additional incentives. We could pro-

vide special considerations to countries which agree to increase per-

centage of capacity utilized.

—Engage in discussion with the holders of large amounts of re-

serves on “ground rules” for investment in industrialized countries.

Trying to reach agreement on general guidelines on what percentage of

what types of companies would be tolerable and on fair treatment

2

The OPEC summit was held March 3–6. See Document 48.



365-608/428-S/80010

August 1974–April 1975 121

(guarantees) for investment would have a highly beneficial reaction in

countries such as Saudi Arabia, Kuwait or Iran. Moreover, it would

better enable the US to attract continuing high levels of investment

from the producers, investment which we need but which can be

scared away by the absence of clearly understood guidelines.

—Seek common objectives and perhaps parallel programs for aid

to developing countries taking advantage of international develop-

ment institutions which can utilize OPEC funds in the most efficient

way, and work toward getting maximum amount of concessional de-

velopment funds from OPEC countries. This, too, would have the effect

of lowering prices and the build up of OPEC revenues.

37.

Minutes of the Secretary of State’s Staff Meeting

1

Washington, January 27, 1975, 8–9:03 a.m.



[Omitted here is discussion unrelated to energy.]

Mr. Boeker: The OPEC Ministers communique´

2

endorses a broad



international conference on the state of the world economy, on the state

of raw-materials development—which would appear to be the format

we saw in the UN Special Session last April, which producers have

shown they could control pretty well.

Our reaction would be that we welcome their endorsement of co-

operation without commenting on this format. And we reiterate that

we hope the consumers, by that time, will take the steps for that kind of

a dialogue.

Secretary Kissinger: By what time? They haven’t given any time

for a communique´ [conference?], have they?

1

Source: National Archives, RG 59, Transcripts of Secretary of State Kissinger’s



Staff Meetings, Lot 78D443, Box 3, Secretary’s Staff Meetings. Secret. Kissinger presided

over the meeting, which was attended by all the principal officers of the Department or

their designated alternates. A table of contents and list of attendees are not printed.

2

The OPEC conference took place in Algiers January 24–26. Although the Embassy



in Algiers did not transmit the complete text of the communique´, it reported that OPEC

“agreed to what is called ‘French proposal for meeting of industrialized countries and

LDCs to study problems of raw materials and development’ in order to further ‘true in-

ternational cooperation’ and ‘dialogue.’” The Embassy concluded: “Believe conference

results better than we had anticipated as far as interests industrialized countries con-

cerned. For whatever reasons, conference has decided take path of relative moderation.

Hope we will be able to demonstrate that moderation pays.” (Telegram 235 from Algiers,

January 26; ibid., Central Foreign Policy Files, D750029–0224)



365-608/428-S/80010

122 Foreign Relations, 1969–1976, Volume XXXVII

Mr. Boeker: This year, it seems to me, by implications.

Mr. Hartman: It seems to me the Algerians have won their point on

this one.

Secretary Kissinger: We can just say we’ve made our position

clear. As late as Friday I said we’re in favor of a dialogue.

3

Just say



we’re in favor of a dialogue and we’re willing to discuss it when con-

sumer cooperation has reached a certain point.

Mr. Hartman: But you will be asked immediately: “Are you in

favor of a dialogue on all commodities?”

Secretary Kissinger: We’ll discuss that at the preparatory confer-

ence. That’s what the preparatory conference is for. It depends on

whether we want to screw the meeting up or have some progress.

Mr. Boeker: Right.

Secretary Kissinger: It’s as simple as that. It’s inconceivable to have

one conference and discuss that and have anything other than what the

Special Session came up with. Is it conceivable to you?

Mr. Hartman: No.

Mr. Boeker: No.

Mr. Hartman: But this is the thing that he’s been pushing because

he sees that if you get into a conference just on oil, there is a possibility

that we can bring pressure on them via the LDCs. And so what he’s try-

ing to do is line up the LDCs.

Secretary Kissinger: Oh, come now! The LDCs won’t bring pres-

sure on them. That’s one of these childish naivete´s.

I would be just as happy if the LDC’s didn’t come. I understand

some of the producers don’t want them either. That’s one of the illu-

sions. That’s like the Kennedy Administration used to think India

would support us on Berlin. We spent a year and a half trying to get

their support.

The LDCs will not support us against the producers in an open

conference.

Mr. Lord: Now that we’re going to get some aid—

Secretary Kissinger: It’s out of the question. The LDCs sympathize

with us—which is far from saying that they will support us. Is there one

Latin American country that will support us?

Mr. Rogers: A.I.D. will keep its mouth shut! (Laughter.)

Secretary Kissinger: Name one LDC that will support us at the con-

ference. Can anyone think of one?

3

January 24. Kissinger addressed the Los Angeles World Affairs Council. For the



text of his speech, see Department of State Bulletin, February 17, 1975, pp. 197–204.

365-608/428-S/80010

August 1974–April 1975 123

Mr. Habib: If we promise them enough aid.

Secretary Kissinger: Which? Name one.

Mr. Habib: I think Singapore! (Laughter.)

I think Korea would, if you gave them enough assurances that

there wouldn’t be a cut-off.

Secretary Kissinger: Korea won’t even be at the conference. Korea

will never be invited. I mean all these—let’s not drown ourselves in

platitudes. If the producers want to exclude the LDCs, we should be de-

lighted to exclude them. There’s nothing in it for us.

I think we ought to play it cool—just say that we note it, we wel-

come it—but in a low-key way—and say, as I pointed out on Friday, all

our policy is geared to having a consumer-producer dialogue.

On what the contents should be, we’ll discuss it at a preparatory

meeting. But if you go across the whole range of economic issues, it’s

going to be a long process.

Mr. Atherton: OPEC is going to have three more meetings in the

summer before anything else happens.

Secretary Kissinger: That’s right. I think we should quite agree.

[Omitted here is discussion unrelated to energy.]

38.

Memorandum of Conversation

1

Washington, January 30, 1975, 11 a.m.–12:50 p.m.



PARTICIPANTS

Prime Minister Harold Wilson

James Callaghan, Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs

Sir John Hunt, Secretary to the Cabinet

President Ford

Dr. Henry A. Kissinger, Secretary of State and Assistant to the President for

National Security Affairs

Lt. Gen. Brent Scowcroft, Deputy Assistant to the President for National Security

Affairs

SUBJECT


Economic Policy; Energy Cooperation; Africa

1

Source: Ford Library, National Security Adviser, Memoranda of Conversations,



Box 9. Secret; Nodis. The meeting was held in the Oval Office.

365-608/428-S/80010

124 Foreign Relations, 1969–1976, Volume XXXVII

[Omitted here is discussion unrelated to energy.]

Energy Cooperation

Wilson: People see you in your State of the Union

2

really having a



go at it.

President: It is a confidence-building program, even if it is changed

somewhat by Congress.

Energy is a tougher problem, and I am accused of trying to ram

something down their throats. But if I hadn’t, Congress would have

continued to drift. Congress is now trying to remove my authority to

do it, but I will stick to it. They are trying to come up with something,

but I don’t think it will be comprehensive. We must save a million

barrels a day; we must have better utilization of coal and develop other

sources of energy.

Wilson: It takes a lot of time. During the war I was Chairman of the

Production Resources Board of the U.S., Great Britain and Canada. So I

know your resources.

Our newly discovered coal, you know, is equal to what we will

gain from North Sea oil.

Kissinger: Where is this?

Wilson: In Yorkshire.

Callaghan: This is the first break we have had in a century.

Wilson: Our energy industry has been subsidized for years; now

coal prices went up 75% last year. We are removing the subsidies from

all the nationalized industries. We’re also taxing gas more.

Callaghan: We have had no demand for rationing yet.

Wilson: What is popular is the idea of a two-tier pricing system. So

it would be a somewhat lower price.

President: I am of the feeling that those who are proposing ra-

tioning have never experienced it. They don’t realize we have to have a

long-range program. This means five to ten years.

Wilson: We need a basic change in attitude if we are to be able to

deal with the long-range problem. We are grateful for the international

cooperative programs you have developed.

President: Henry has told me of the strong support you have

given. We appreciate it.

Wilson: It was the right group to organize.

Callaghan: The next big problem is the consumer-producer confer-

ence. The French gave a friendly report of the Martinique meeting, but I

still foresee them going in a somewhat different direction.

2

See footnote 3, Document 33.



365-608/428-S/80010

August 1974–April 1975 125

Kissinger: They tend to use the conference as a substitute for any

other kind of action.

Wilson: At the EC–Nine Summit meeting, Giscard said he is

prepared for a meeting of the consumers, but as the prelude to the

consumer-producer conference.

3

The first time he mentioned indexa-



tion, I said, OK, but it had to be at a lower price.

Callaghan: Timing is important. The French are already lining

people up for the preparatory conference of consumers and producers

in March.

Kissinger: But there can’t be one if we won’t come. And we will

come to a conference when the preparations are made, but not when

the consumers are still quarreling.

Callaghan: There won’t be quarreling at the preparatory meeting.

It is just to set up the consumer-producer conference.

The French want to chair it. They say it’s because it was their idea,

but it is deeper than that. I think the preparatory conference should be

at the official, not the ministerial, level.

4

Wilson: That way you could more easily preserve your position.



We have a problem with the French, and I think Giscard has a problem.

The Gaullists are putting out this stuff about his private life. Schmidt

thinks they are putting out that if Mitterand would break with the

Communists, Giscard could join them and isolate both extremes.

Callaghan: He wants better cooperation with the United States.

Kissinger: Since Martinique he has been better.

Callaghan: But you can assume they will play with the Arabs on

the Mideast.

Your financial plan

5

went very well.



Kissinger: Healey gave us a hard time for a couple of hours.

Wilson: Names got put on proposals unfortunately. Ours is too

little but it was early. Yours works late but adequately.

Kissinger: They are totally complementary.

3

See footnote 2, Document 24.



4

On January 31, Kissinger told Davignon that to hold the conference at the Ministe-

rial level “would give it bigger significance than it should have.” He also said that he

“would not be happy with the French as chairman.” Davignon informed Kissinger that

he was “getting nowhere with the French except on a purely bilateral and unofficial

basis,” adding that “on substance, though, they are close to all of us, but they remain

stubborn on procedures,” which he called a “silly position.” Davignon hoped that, by

March, the French would “be more reasonable—after the preliminary meeting,” and was

happy that they had at least agreed to IEA participation in the meeting. (Memorandum of

conversation, January 31; National Archives, RG 59, Central Foreign Policy Files,

P840157–0509)

5

See Document 15.



365-608/428-S/80010

126 Foreign Relations, 1969–1976, Volume XXXVII

Callaghan: Our consumer solidarity, the other aspects are conser-

vation and alternative sources. How far do you want to go before you

are ready?

Kissinger: On alternative sources we will be ready with proposals

for the IEA meeting next week. We would like to have agreement on

the direction in which we’ll go. We could have mutual investment in

each other’s programs and a country would get a return proportionate

to its investment. If all these things work, we could have agreement on

a common overall price to protect the new investment in alternative

sources.


Wilson: Our proven oil reserves, at OPEC prices less 10%, amount

to $120 billion. By 1980 we will be self-sufficient. We will refine about

two-thirds of it ourselves. The rest of it will be sold non-

discriminatorily.

President: Do you have a refining capacity?

Wilson: Not enough. We have to build some. It is beautiful

low-sulfur oil. I think there is more oil west of Britain and North of

France.


The first gas strike is much shallower than in the North Sea. We

will run into a boundary problem with France.

Callaghan: The Saudis offered us 300,000 barrels a day in exchange

for repayment with our oil after 1980. We don’t know what interest

they would charge. We wanted to talk to you first. We would like to

pursue it, but wanted to let you know about it first.

President: What percent of your imports is that?

Callaghan: It is quite sizable, maybe 15 to 20 percent.

Wilson: We should get the Arabs interested in other forms of en-

ergy, because they will run out.

Kissinger: We heard that the Saudis would offer bilateral deals

with the Europeans to ease the pressure on them.

Wilson: In six years, when Jim is Chairman of OPEC . . .

Kissinger: A terrifying thought!

Wilson: Are you thinking about other “PEC’s”? Many other raw

materials prices are going down now, fortunately. But there’s phos-

phate ore, copper, and so on. We are returning to the old producer car-

tels, which never worked. The tin agreement, the sugar agreement,

never did well. But shouldn’t we be looking into this?

Kissinger: We are looking at it, and we haven’t come to any conclu-

sion. We had a preliminary bureaucratic study which concluded it

wasn’t possible. We would be happy to study it jointly with you.

Callaghan: This question will be raised at the consumer-producer

conference and at our next Commonwealth conference. If we could



365-608/428-S/80010

August 1974–April 1975 127

start some work in this area, we could maybe break up the Group of

77.


6

The UN is always against us.

Wilson: Oil is all tied up with the Mideast. To the extent that we

can look at price rigging without the oil/political aspects, we can see

what might be done on a purely economic basis.

President: Producer cartels work well in good times but I wonder

about it in bad times.

Kissinger: What the Prime Minister is saying is if we could get

something going in a commodity in which the Third World would be

interested—like fertilizer—we could use it as an example of how to go

about this.

Wilson: The Commonwealth Conference is a good forum for

members to look at things from a perspective which they don’t ordi-

narily use. We should use it more.

[Omitted here is discussion unrelated to energy, followed by a dis-

cussion of British and U.S. domestic energy policy.]

6

The Group of 77, or G–77, was a group of developing countries established in



1964.

39.

Memorandum of Conversation

1

Washington, February 3, 1975, 5–6 p.m.



SUBJECT

Energy Policy

PARTICIPANTS

Honorable Henry A. Kissinger, Secretary of State

Honorable Charles W. Robinson, Under Secretary for Economic Affairs

Honorable Thomas O. Enders, Assistant Secretary/EB

Mr. Stephen W. Bosworth, Director, Office of Fuels and Energy/EB

Honorable William E. Simon, Secretary of the Treasury

Honorable Jack F. Bennett, Under Secretary for Monetary Affairs

Honorable Charles A. Cooper, Assistant Secretary/OAS/IA

Honorable Gerald L. Parsky, Assistant Secretary/TE&FR

1

Source: National Archives, RG 59, Records of Henry Kissinger, Lot 91D414, Box



10, Classified External Memoranda of Conversations, January–April 1975. Secret; Nodis.

Drafted by Bosworth. The meeting was held in the Secretary’s office.



365-608/428-S/80010

128 Foreign Relations, 1969–1976, Volume XXXVII

Kissinger: When are you leaving for Paris?

Parsky: No, Tom and I are going to Paris.

2

Kissinger: Somehow I had heard that you, Bill, were going.



Simon: No, I just came back from London. I was there with a group

of Congressmen and others taking care of your friend, Denis Healey, at

the Ditchley Conference.

3

I thought that with Gerry and Chuck going to Paris for these



various negotiations and me testifying on the Hill, we should focus on

some areas of our policy that appear to be most unclear. The major

question I’m getting, Henry, from all people, is whether we have re-

versed our price objectives. Are we now trying to keep prices high

rather than to get some lower? These are some questions that are

growing out of your speech.

Kissinger: I understood that my speech

4

had been cleared by



Treasury.

Parsky: Oh yes, I read it and cleared it.

Kissinger: I had not planned to give that speech. The President

specifically asked me to make it.

Simon: Well, on this price question, the line I’m taking is that

higher prices now will bring down prices later.

Kissinger: Plus the fact that if OPEC puts in higher prices the

money is lost through the balance of payments. These conservation

price increases will be money for the USG and not for the producers.

Simon: So, you agree, our objective is still to bring down prices?

Kissinger: Definitely. The only person I know against lower prices

is Enders. Seriously, is anyone against bringing down prices?

Enders: Absolutely not.

Parsky: The issue is really this question of a floor price.

Kissinger: Well, if we got prices down to $7.00, that would be an

effective 30 percent decrease. That certainly won’t happen soon in any

case.

2

The monthly meeting of the Governing Board of the International Energy Agency



convened in Paris on February 5.

3

The meeting was held February 1–2 at the Ditchley Park estate outside of Oxford,



England, to discuss the financial problems stemming from surplus oil revenues. Simon,

Burns, and other U.S. officials attended.

4

In a speech at the National Press Club, February 3, Kissinger outlined the proposal



the United States would make at the February 5 IEA Governing Board meeting: “In order

to bring about adequate investment in the development of conventional nuclear and

fossil energy sources, the major oil-importing nations should agree that they will not

allow imported oil to be sold domestically at prices that would make those new sources

noncompetitive.” Either the consumer nations could set a common floor price or the IEA

nations could establish a common IEA tariff on oil imports. For text, see Department of

State Bulletin, February 24, 1975, pp. 237–245.


365-608/428-S/80010

August 1974–April 1975 129

Simon: Well, I’m not so sure, Henry. I’m personally convinced,

though I don’t go around saying this, that prices will come down soon,

if we just let the market work.

Kissinger: But how can the market work if the sellers operate as a

cartel?

Simon: Well, there’s a lot of oil in the world.



Bennett: The question before us is really whether to go for a floor

price or a tariff. The floor price strikes the producers as a completely in-

flexible position and offers them no incentive to raise production and

cut prices.

Kissinger: Well, can’t we put both forward at this time? Either

must be geared in any case to a common price. We must also offer some

price protection for our investors.

Bennett: Can’t we find a balance between no price protection and

no possibility of the market price ever going below the protected price?

We don’t need to eliminate all risk for the private companies. Com-

panies are willing to take risks.

Kissinger: Do we have to settle this now?

Simon: The floor price is just one option. I don’t believe a floor

price is either politically or economically viable. But we don’t have to

settle this here.

Kissinger: Then what is the problem?

Simon: The problem is that in some quarters it is perceived that the

floor price is the preferred US position.

Kissinger: But I still don’t see what is the problem.

Bennett: Do you really have in mind using either a floor price or a

tariff as options for getting a fixed bottom price?

Kissinger: I thought the tariff, frankly, was just another way of get-

ting a floor price. But what is this sliding scale for a tariff and what does

that mean? I’m confident that we can get the consumers to agree on a

floor price.

Cooper: But at what level?

Kissinger: Around $7.00. What do you think?

Cooper: I think you could get them at $3 or $4.

Kissinger: But that’s trivial and meaningless.

Cooper: But when you get up to $6 to $7 it’s much more difficult.

That’s why $3 to $4 tariff would be much better.

Simon: I for one believe that the future price will be below $7 and

when the price falls, the other consumers will say, why a floor price?

and then they’ll all fall away.

Enders: But Bill, at $5 we’ll be importing 20 million barrels of oil a

day by 1985.



365-608/428-S/80010

130 Foreign Relations, 1969–1976, Volume XXXVII

Simon: You economists make me sick. We can get a lot of oil at $5.

We can get Alaskan oil at $5. Companies are willing to go do it right

now.

Enders: Then why do the companies say that we’ll be importing 15



MMBD by 1985? Jamieson

5

says it’s totally unrealistic to set a depend-



ency figure of 5 million barrels.

Simon: Jamieson said that?

Bennett: I don’t trust Jamieson’s figures. I should know. I used to

give them to him.

My feeling is that to sell something we must have a figure with

some give in it. We must have some incentive to the Arabs to lower

their price. We must strike a balance between protection for US in-

vestors and the need for a flexible position with which to begin talking

with the producers. We can’t begin to talk with the producers if we just

have one set price.

Kissinger: Why not? We can do a 5 year agreement at prices below

current levels, but above those which will exist in 10 years.

Cooper: That just says that in the long run you’re going to be

crushed. The producers just won’t find that a convincing position.

Enders: At the moment producers don’t believe any of this. They

don’t think we are really serious.

Bennett: When we get to a producer-consumer conference we must

be able to show them that at a lower price they will get more income.

Kissinger: But even with a floor price, you will have all that area

between $7 and $11 to play with in talking with producers.

Enders: Also, Jack, that kind of calculation overlooks the fact that

demand is very inelastic. The producers know that and they gear their

whole strategy to it. They stand to lose revenues by cutting prices.

Simon: That’s just a short-term argument.

Kissinger: But let me see if I understand this. The major difference

between Jack’s proposal and my proposal of today doesn’t exist be-

tween $7 and $11. The difference is you would like something with a

variable floor price.

Enders: In addition, Jack would also have a tariff above the floor

price.


Bennett: We’ve got one now.

Robinson: You are really proposing a variable tariff?

Kissinger: Jack, please give me a description of how your system

would work. I’m sorry, but I need a tutorial.

5

L. Kenneth Jamieson, Chairman and Chief Executive Officer of Exxon



Corporation.

365-608/428-S/80010

August 1974–April 1975 131

Bennett: Well, there are essentially two versions. Under the first,

with a fixed tariff, Arab oil would always be more expensive. Under the

second, you would have a variable tariff which would contract as the

price fell.

Kissinger: Suppose I thought $7 was the right price, then the price

of oil would have to go below $4 before there would be any difference

between a floor price and $3 tariff.

Bennett: There’s another issue here. Are we going to guarantee

OPEC an outlet for its oil? That’s moving awfully fast toward socialism.

Kissinger: The companies are dumb enough for socialism, that

idiot Warner, for example.

Simon: I think Warner

6

is one of the best of the oil people.



Kissinger: But doesn’t he believe the US should import more oil?

Enders: They all do, all the company people.

Jack, we have many alternative sources with known costs or rela-

tively known costs—nuclear energy and conventional oil, for example.

Maybe these costs will go down, but it’s very unlikely. We want to give

them basic protection.

Kissinger: Well, my first question is what is going to happen at the

IEA? The US simply cannot afford another spectacle of our delegation

presenting differing views. It would just be disastrous if, two days after

my speech, we did something like that. Then the other question is what

are we going to say here in town. And then how are we going to decide

this question?

Do we have to decide the issue now? Since I don’t believe mid-East

oil is ever going below $4, what is the argument against a $3 tariff?

Enders: The question is, which is more negotiable?

Cooper: Well, the tariff could have a trigger point at, say, $7.

Enders: If you have a trigger point, then it’s the same proposal.

Kissinger: I want to prevent a situation in which the US carries all

the water. We’ll spend all this money to bring down energy prices and

everyone else will reap all the benefits. If we don’t get the Europeans

locked onto something now, they’ll take advantage of us in the future.

We don’t need them to develop our alternative energy, but my objec-

tive has always been to get them locked onto something that will pro-

tect us in the future.

Bennett: Exactly, we must have some commonality. That’s

essential.

6

Rawleigh Warner, Chairman and Chief Executive Officer of Mobil Oil



Corporation.

365-608/428-S/80010

132 Foreign Relations, 1969–1976, Volume XXXVII

Kissinger: Right now they are weak, and they need us. Five years

from now they won’t be weak. When they catch on to how weak this

country is domestically, they’ll jump to take advantage of us. Already,

as a result of my Business Week statement,

7

they are getting special price



treatment from the Arabs. I don’t really mind that. It actually helps us

in the Middle East. But the people most consistently opposing US ini-

tiatives are the Europeans. The Japanese at least move in response to

their own self-interest. But the history of Europe is that countries

always join together to cut up the strongest nation. Any system we can

devise now on energy, which can prevent this from happening to us in

the future, is fine with me.

Enders: This was the principle which was set forth in the Presi-

dent’s State of the Union message—the need to provide some price pro-

tection for domestic investors.

Kissinger: My concern is that if we don’t go into this meeting this

week as though we know what we are doing, we are going to get killed.

Can’t we delay for three weeks on our decision on which of two ap-

proaches we will use? We could say that they need further technical

study. We could also use that same line here in Washington.

Bennett: That’s fine.

Kissinger: Look Jack, I don’t want to try solutions which make no

economic sense, so let’s review this further and then, if necessary, we’ll

go to the President for a decision.

Enders: But the common tariff will be much more difficult to

negotiate.

Kissinger: Perhaps, but you will get a reading on that this week.

It’s possible that we won’t be able to sell either approach.

Simon: On another subject, Henry. At Ditchley last weekend there

was great discussion of the producer-consumer conference. All the

people there thought the conference should be scrubbed. Everyone

thought what we should do is encourage more Arab investments in our

countries.

Kissinger: Listen, if I can get Parsky and Robinson to run those bi-

lateral commissions as I want, I’m prepared to run a producer-

consumer conference bilaterally. We’ve got to come up with ways to

soak up their dough. If those Bedouins want to use all of their money to

build soccer stadiums, that’s fine with me. I’m rather attracted to the

Roosa plan.

8

The idea of establishing such mutual funds appeals to me



if we can do it bilaterally.

7

See Document 30.



8

Roosa wanted to establish a giant mutual fund in which OPEC nations could in-

vest their accumulating petrodollars over the long term.


365-608/428-S/80010

August 1974–April 1975 133

On Pan American, I told Peter Peterson last week that I had no for-

eign objection to Iranian purchase of Pan American stock.

I definitely think we should use the commissions. I don’t care

about a producer-consumer conference. You will all remember that I

have never been very enthusiastic about it, and I’ve been stalling as

much as possible. The French will just try to make us their straight men

in any conference such as that.

Simon: Henry, another issue which is concerning us are the pro-

posals coming out of State to limit OPEC investments to 10% in any one

company.


Kissinger: Who has said that?

Simon: Enders.

Kissinger: Ah, Enders! Enders goes around town saying he has

never had a Secretary out of whom he has gotten such good work. Let’s

get a paper together and get a policy decided. I think we should absorb

as much of their money as we possibly can. I have no intention of put-

ting all US interest into a producer-consumer conference.

Simon: Our objective of attracting more Arab money is going to be

complicated if the Enders plan surfaces for a 10 percent limit.

Enders: That’s neither a plan nor a proposal. My only objective

was to ensure that all feasible options are considered. The original draft

issue paper had only one option, and I just wanted to get others in-

cluded for examination.

Kissinger: Well, can’t we get a policy on this by the end of Feb-

ruary? I do want them out of national security industries and those

areas where their investment control would be demoralizing to US cit-

izens. But, beyond that, our principal objective should be to maximize

their dependence on us.

Simon: I’m glad to hear that. That’s the only reason I’m here—to

make sure you have not been brainwashed. I’ve been hearing different

sorts of things from levels underneath ours.

Kissinger: Enders does not consider himself beneath any level. His

psychological view of our relationship is symbolized by the difference

in our heights. Seriously, we must at all cost avoid open dissent. We

simply can’t afford that.

Simon: I agree fully. One more point. On the Roosa recycling idea,

I don’t think we need the Roosa mechanism.

Kissinger: I’ve asked George Shultz to ask the Shah what he thinks

about it. Shultz will simply ask him the question and won’t put it for-

ward as a US proposal. Then we will consider it in the light of the

Shah’s reaction. I’m very open-minded on these subjects. I am in favor

of anything that will get the job done fast. The advantage I see in the

Roosa proposal is that it couples the interest of the producers with the


365-608/428-S/80010

134 Foreign Relations, 1969–1976, Volume XXXVII

objects of their potential political blackmail. What is your objection to

it?


Simon: Just imagine what the Arabs will say if we tell them we will

take their money and then tell them what to do with it.

Enders: But Roosa proposes doing that through private companies

and through the US Government.

Robinson: I think we must look at this carefully. We have a

growing political problem on this issue which might be blunted by

something along the lines of the Roosa idea.

Bennett: I don’t think that idea would blunt anything.

Kissinger: I’ll only support it if a major producer such as the Shah

says he likes it.

Well, let’s see if we can summarize what we have agreed on. First,

on the floor price—we will keep open the two alternatives, a floor price

or a tariff—as long as it is a tariff on a sliding scale. We agree that any

international agreement must be made now, not put off until the need

actually arises. At this week’s meeting we will put forward both con-

cepts as feasible and give them equal exposure. Then, we will proceed

with more technical study and, if necessary, go to the President for a

decision.

On the investment question, we agree that we must have a

short-term policy proposal to take to the President by March 1. I can’t

conceive that we won’t agree on this one.

On the commissions, we will push hard to try to get as much done

through them as possible. We will try to have a fait accompli at any

producer-consumer conference. If we can handle investment through

the commissions, so much the better.

Meeting Adjourned.



365-608/428-S/80010

August 1974–April 1975 135



Download 8.4 Mb.

Do'stlaringiz bilan baham:
1   ...   11   12   13   14   15   16   17   18   ...   95




Ma'lumotlar bazasi mualliflik huquqi bilan himoyalangan ©fayllar.org 2020
ma'muriyatiga murojaat qiling