Foreign relations of the united states 1969–1976 volume XXXVII energy crisis, 1974–1980 department of state washington


Download 8.4 Mb.
Pdf ko'rish
bet18/95
Sana17.02.2017
Hajmi8.4 Mb.
1   ...   14   15   16   17   18   19   20   21   ...   95

Kissinger

2

A similar letter was sent to Schmidt on February 22. (Telegram 40613 to Bonn;



ibid., Presidential Country Files for Europe and Canada, Box 6, Germany—State Depart-

ment Telegrams from SECSTATE–NODIS (2))

3

On February 24, Deputy Chief of Mission Thomas P. Shoesmith delivered Ford’s



letter to Vice Foreign Minister Togo, who assured him that he would convey it

“promptly” to the Prime Minister. (Telegram 2364 from Tokyo; ibid., Presidential

Country Files for East Asia and the Pacific, Box 8, Japan—State Department Telegrams,

To SECSTATE–NODIS (4)) Miki replied on March 4 and, raising the issue of the IEA,

wrote: “In the Agency’s formulation and the implementation of the specific cooperative

measures for this purpose, full consideration should be given to the situation of those

countries which have little energy sources to develop within their own countries and that

care should be taken to present those measures in a least confrontational manner in rela-

tion to the oil producing countries.” (Telegram 2828 from Tokyo, March 5; ibid., Presi-

dential Correspondence with Foreign Leaders, Box 2, Japan—Prime Minister Miki (1))



45.

Telegram From the Department of State to the Embassy in

France

1

Washington, March 1, 1975, 0332Z.



46576. Subject: French Invitations to Prepcon. For the Ambassador

from the Secretary for delivery before 8 AM March 1. In response to

Sauvagnargues’ letter delivered to me February 28 and transmitted to

1

Source: Ford Library, National Security Adviser, Presidential Country Files for



Europe and Canada, Box 4, France—State Department Telegrams from SECSTATE–

NODIS (2). Secret; Flash; Nodis. Drafted by Preeg, cleared by Enders and Hartman, and

approved by Eagleburger.


365-608/428-S/80010

August 1974–April 1975 153

you separately,

2

please deliver following message to Sauvagnargues in



your call on him scheduled for March 1.

3

This is a revised text that re-



places message sent to you earlier today.

4

Begin text:

Dear Mr. Minister:

In response to your letter to me dated February 28, I have further

considered carefully the arguments you put forward for sending out

invitations to the preparatory meeting at this time. My strong view re-

mains, however, that we should wait until the requisite consumer soli-

darity is achieved before proceeding to make formal proposals for such

a meeting.

In support of this conclusion, I want to take strong exception once

again to the notion that the consumers ought to gear themselves to

OPEC meetings. This idea seems to be based on the premise that we

cannot have a productive dialogue without taking measures to tranqui-

lize the producers. On the contrary, as we explained in Martinique and

subsequently, the preparations among consumers for meetings with

producers are the indispensable elements for a successful and con-

structive dialogue with the producers. We intend to do our part in

order to make the necessary preparations for such a meeting and,

indeed, we look forward to making good progress on the major re-

maining issue at the next meeting of the IEA Governing Board sched-

uled for March 6–7.

Contrary to the suggestion that producing governments hope that

the invitations will be issued prior to the Algiers summit, several

members of OPEC have indicated to us that they made no final decision

on the timing and composition of a preparatory meeting. Since France’s

intention to issue an invitation to producers, consumers, and develop-

ing countries can be a mystery to no one, it would seem prudent to de-

2

Sent in telegram 46562 to Paris, March 1. (National Archives, RG 59, Central For-



eign Policy Files, P850086–2207)

3

Rush delivered Kissinger’s letter to Sauvagnargues on March 1. Before reading it,



Sauvagnargues informed the Ambassador that France had sent the invitations to the

producer-consumer conference the previous day. The Foreign Minister explained that

the decision was Giscard’s, which he made because he and Sauvagnargues believed that:

1) consumer solidarity had been achieved; 2) Algeria posed a potential problem in terms

of agreeing to the conference’s list of participants and agenda, prompting the French to

distribute the invitations before the next OPEC summit meeting (which Yamani and

other Arab representatives agreed was the right thing to do); and 3) “no approval of the

U.S. or IEA was necessary for calling the meeting.” (Telegram 5327 from Paris, March 1;

Ford Library, National Security Adviser, Presidential Country Files for Europe and

Canada, Box 4, France—State Department Telegrams to SECSTATE–NODIS (3)) Giscard

sent invitations to the Chiefs of State of Algeria, Saudi Arabia, Brazil, India, Iran, Japan,

Venezuela, Zaire, and the United States to attend the conference. A translation of the text

is in telegram 5328 from Paris, March 1. (Ibid.)

4

Telegram 45836 to Paris, February 28. (Ibid., France—State Department Telegrams



from SECSTATE–NODIS (2))

365-608/428-S/80010

154 Foreign Relations, 1969–1976, Volume XXXVII

lay issuance of the invitations themselves until the main parties in

question have made a decision on the mode and timing of their partici-

pation. To do otherwise would put at risk a process on which we both

agree and which appears to be advancing properly.

I recognize of course that the French Government may be in a posi-

tion in its discussions with producers wherein you might consider it

desirable, even imperative, to communicate with them before the

OPEC summit meeting next week regarding invitations for the prepa-

ratory conference. This may be possible with a communication that

does not go to the point of a formal invitation to a preparatory meeting.

You could inform the producers of the likelihood that invitations

would be forthcoming shortly for a preparatory meeting along the lines

of the timing we discussed last week. You might wish to relate this to

the current status of deliberations in the IEA, including the importance

of the March 6–7 meeting, as well as to the understanding reached with

the United States at Martinique that proposals for holding a prepara-

tory meeting would be contingent upon substantial progress among

consumers in the fields of energy conservation, financial solidarity, and

the development of new sources of energy.

5

With best regards,



Sincerely, Henry A. Kissinger

His Excellency Jean Sauvagnargues,

Minister of Foreign Affairs,

Paris.


End text.

Kissinger

5

On March 3, Kissinger sent a message to Callaghan and Genscher regarding the



conference invitations that France distributed on February 28. He relayed Sau-

vagnargues’s justifications for sending them and told them of his previous efforts to pre-

vent France from doing so “until the requirements specified in the Martinique agreement

and in the December 19–20 IEA Governing Board decision had been satisfied.” He wrote:

“By issuing invitations before the OPEC meeting, we risk formation of a united OPEC

stand. Algeria’s reaction suggests that this is just what is going to happen.” While he and

Ford would do their “utmost to avoid any public debate with the French” over the issue,

Kissinger said, he advised that the IEA Governing Board “take no action on the French

invitation” until it reached “final agreement on alternate sources.” He concluded: “For

our part, we do not plan to respond to the French invitation until the established require-

ments are met.” (Telegram 46724 to London and Bonn, March 3; ibid., Box 15, United

Kingdom—State Department Telegrams from SECSTATE–NODIS (3))



365-608/428-S/80010

August 1974–April 1975 155



46.

Memorandum of Conversation

1

Washington, March 3, 1975, 7:45–8:15 p.m.



SUBJECT

U.S. Energy Policy

PARTICIPANTS

Department of State

Treasury

The Secretary

Secretary Simon

Assistant Secretary Enders

Under Secretary Bennett

Mr. G.P. Balabanis (notetaker)

Assistant Secretary Cooper

Assistant Secretary Parsky

(Secretaries Kissinger and Simon met privately from 7:30–7:45)

Kissinger: Bill and I are trying to prevent contradictions from ap-

pearing about our policy. We can’t have statements coming out that are

contradictory.

2

At this juncture, we simply can’t afford it.



Parsky: But that didn’t happen . . . What happened was . . . if you

are talking about the misrepresentation in the Newsweek article . . .

Kissinger: Whatever happened, we simply can’t afford it being

said that we have no firm policy. We can debate the mechanism of the

policy, but we can’t have the situation where Sauvagnargues can say

the Americans really don’t have a policy.

Parsky: I thought we had previously only agreed to a study of al-

ternative mechanisms for achieving the general policy goal of encour-

aging conservation and development.

Kissinger: The President has approved the basic concept of a guar-

anteed floor price.

3

We can let countries choose their own means of



achieving it—whether you use peanut oil to support the price or a vari-

able levy or whatever—but the concept of the guaranteed floor price

has been agreed to.

Can we agree on this paper.

4

This would be from Kissinger and



Simon, directed to Parsky and Enders.

1

Source: National Archives, RG 59, Records of Henry Kissinger, Lot 91D414, Box



10, Classified External Memoranda of Conversations, January–April 1975. Secret; Nodis.

Drafted by Gordon P. Balabanis (EB/IFD/OMA). The meeting was held in the Secre-

tary’s office.

2

See footnote 2, Document 43.



3

Ford and Kissinger discussed it during a meeting that morning. (Memorandum of

conversation, March 3; Ford Library, National Security Adviser, Memoranda of Conver-

sations, Box 9)

4

Not found.



365-608/428-S/80010

156 Foreign Relations, 1969–1976, Volume XXXVII

What has to come out of this meeting isn’t an academic study.

I am concerned with our overall strategic aims. We need to have a max-

imum number of ties to keep the Europeans from trying to screw us.

They’ve already screwed us in this call for the preparatory producer-

consumer conference. That’s why we can’t afford to let them exploit

public differences . . .

Parsky: But I didn’t say . . .

Kissinger: I don’t know what you said—all I know is that every

newspaperman on my plane understood it that way. But let’s not argue

about the past. What we need to get settled is how we proceed from

here. My boy Enders has a devious mind—he figures they won’t agree

to a common external tariff, so we need to have another proposal—

right?

Enders: Right. They won’t agree to adopt a tariff.



Kissinger: I can give you an absolute guarantee they won’t.

Simon: If you think they won’t agree to a tariff, why do you think

they will agree to a floor price?

Kissinger: They will, if we really get behind it, and use some

muscle.

Bennett: I’m worried about putting U.S. firms at a competitive dis-



advantage, if they have to operate with higher priced oil. That’s why

we need to get them to put on a tariff too.

Enders: The U.S. tariff will be phased out anyway—it is only

temporary.

Bennett: What worries me is that we won’t end up with an inte-

grated program with the other consumers.

Kissinger: We’re talking about entirely different things. You’re

saying . . . we’re putting on a $2 tariff, so you (the Europeans) do it too.

What we’re saying is—whatever you do now about conservation, we

wish to protect against a drastic price drop later on—which will put us

in a worse position of dependence than we’re in now.

Bennett: What we’re really talking about is getting investment in

energy development. I’m absolutely convinced that a tariff will do a

better job in getting the investment we need.

Kissinger: But a lot more will agree to a floor price than a tariff.

Enders: We can probably get agreement to a position which in-

cludes a fork of $6–8.

Kissinger: What’s the argument against both?

Enders: Fine, but others probably won’t agree. We can’t go to the

Europeans and say, we are putting on a tariff, so, in order that our ex-

porters won’t be at a competitive disadvantage, you do too.


365-608/428-S/80010

August 1974–April 1975 157

Bennett: But can’t we put it this way—we all need to conserve in

our own best interests . . .

Enders: They’re already doing more in conservation than we are.

Also, the burden of a tariff is greater on them, with their heavier reli-

ance on imported oil.

Bennett: I don’t think so. They get to keep the tariff proceeds.

Enders: Unless you can generate some support for the tariff, you

need to go for the floor concept.

Cooper: I’m not sure a $6–8 range is worth much.

Kissinger: What makes you think it’s not worth much?

Enders: I think we can get $7.

Kissinger: The French will accept it. The Germans will accept.

Enders: Maybe not Germany.

Kissinger: Schmidt told me he was for it.

Simon: The Germans will want to set a price so low it becomes

inoperative.

Kissinger: I can understand your preference for a tariff, and I

would go along if it were equally attainable. You’ve got the economic

expertise, and I would yield to your judgment.

For me, having agreement on the floor price is a means of political

warfare. We’ll have a range going into the conference. The producers

won’t know what floor price we’re aiming at—exactly where the

trigger is—when we’ll do nasty things to them.

What I want to avoid at the meeting is a discussion after which we

end up doing nothing.

My preference would be to go for some bilateral deals myself. I

have every intention of screwing the Europeans before they screw us.

Parsky: But they claim to like the floor price idea themselves.

Kissinger: Yes, but they claim to like a lot of things—conservation,

for example. They’re no longer talking so tough—saying they can put

the oil price wherever they please. They no longer have that fighting

spirit.


Can we agree to this paper?

Simon: I think this is the position we’ve had right along.

Kissinger: We can satisfy your theological points. You can go for

your tariff, and they will turn you down. Then, the question is, what do

we do then? Do we just go home to think it over? Or do we go right

away for the floor price?

Now, I know that Enders is a pain in the neck—a genius, but a pain

in the neck—

Parsky: Are we going to accept the last part of that statement?


365-608/428-S/80010

158 Foreign Relations, 1969–1976, Volume XXXVII

Kissinger: You’d better watch Enders—make sure the tariff gets a

fair hearing.

Parsky: Ok, then, we’re anticipating that we can’t get agreement on

the tariff, then we go for floor price.

Kissinger: If we get them to agree to a tariff, I have no problems

with that.

Parsky: You’ll agree to a tariff.

Kissinger: A phased in tariff on the price drops doesn’t seem very

different from a floor price.

Enders: That’s equivalent to a floor, what they’re talking about is a

tariff phased in independent of what happens to price.

Kissinger: You want to have my sense of the negotiations at this

stage on getting the floor price. Once Congress has legislated the $2 im-

port fee, then, if we use enough muscle we can get them to substitute it

or phase it in.

If everyone can live with this paper let’s sign it. (to Parsky) If we

sign this, will you take Simon’s orders?

Parsky: I take them every day.

Kissinger: Enders never makes that claim, that he follows my

orders every day. Can you imagine what it’s like in a Department with

both Enders and Sonnenfeldt?

I am no economist. I will take my economic lead from you—but I

want to create the appearance of some objective ties—some obstacles to

the Europeans going off on bilateral deals. Before any of these long-run

contingencies occur, before all this happens, other things will change—

I am convinced of that.

(meeting ended at 8:15 p.m.)


365-608/428-S/80010

August 1974–April 1975 159



47.

Memorandum From Robert Hormats of the National Security

Council Staff to Secretary of State Kissinger

1

Washington, March 4, 1975.



SUBJECT

Report on Meetings in the Middle East

Under Secretary Robinson’s trip

2

was a valuable step toward



strengthened cooperation with OPEC and Middle East countries. Intro-

ducing Robinson to key officials as your representative gave the trip

significant momentum. Robinson’s meetings gave credibility to the po-

sition that we are genuinely interested in stronger bilateral ties and elic-

ited a positive response by Arab and Iranian officials. The visit fur-

thered our policy of “constructive cooperation” with OPEC countries

on broader consumer/producer oil and financial issues, and removed

much of the suspicion which had built up in Arab circles that the US

was seeking a confrontation.

Several significant points emerged from our meetings. The decline

in demand for oil is putting strains on OPEC. These will lead to greater

friction among OPEC countries. But the common desire to maintain re-

munerative oil prices, and a common recognition that a price-cutting

free-for-all harmful to all members could occur without some degree of

organization still provides enough incentive to ensure cohesion suffi-

cient to maintain OPEC as a viable organization.

But OPEC has lost some of its confidence. It is now searching for

ways of dealing with the adverse impact on it resulting from the inter-

national economic problems it has in large measure caused. There is a

possibility that, as a result of downward pressure on oil demand and

thus on prices (resulting in part from conservation and new production

in response to price increases of the past year, and from the worldwide

recession) and of erosion of the value of reserves and oil receipts

through inflation and the depreciation of the dollar, OPEC countries

will take disruptive actions such as unilateral indexation, tying oil pay-

ments to SDR’s, arbitrary cutbacks in production by major producers,

and shifts in reserve holdings. Some countries, anxious to translate eco-

nomic power into political power, will be attracted to investments

which provide influence and leverage. Some will receive attractive of-

fers from consuming countries attempting to minimize the adverse ef-

1

Source: Ford Library, National Security Adviser, Presidential Country Files for



Middle East and South Asia, Box 1, Middle East General (6). Secret.

2

Robinson toured the Middle East during the last 2 weeks of February.



365-608/428-S/80010

160 Foreign Relations, 1969–1976, Volume XXXVII

fects of their present economic circumstances by increasing exports and

securing investment.

Our policies toward key OPEC countries should aim at achieving

the following objectives: (a) reduction of the possibility of disruptive

behavior by OPEC countries and their potential for separating other oil

consumers from the US, (b) developing orderly international arrange-

ments to ensure that OPEC financial resources are used constructively,

(c) making other consumer countries more comfortable with an intensi-

fication of consumer cooperation by quieting fears about confrontation

and easing OPEC pressures on the one hand while, on the other, letting

them understand that we can beat them in competition for bilateral

deals should they refuse to cooperate in a multilateral approach and in-

dulge in excessive efforts to work out their own bilateral deals with

producers and (d) complementing your political efforts to normalize

relations with Arab nations and help to bring about a Middle East set-

tlement by forging strong ties of economic self-interest.

In order to achieve the above results we should concentrate, in the

following ways, on Iran, Saudi Arabia, Egypt and Algeria.



Iran,

of the above mentioned nations, is politically, and economi-

cally, closest to us. It has no interest in using its oil to make life difficult

for the US or the West (on the contrary, it wants to move closer to us) or

to exert political pressure vis-a`-vis Israel; and it has no interest in

leading a crusade in behalf of the Third World. Iran wants to develop

its economy and to play a growing and stabilizing political and military

role in West Asia. While Iran clearly wants to prevent a decline in the

purchasing power of its oil revenues (and thus has proposed indexa-

tion and a possible link of oil prices to SDR’s), it is prepared to discuss

with us the best method of achieving this rather than lead a unilateral

OPEC effort to increase prices. Our interests lie in (a) sharing our analy-

sis of these oil price proposals with Iran in order to avoid giving the im-

pression that we do not take seriously Iranian concerns and (b) to find,

if possible, common ground to meet our needs for oil price stability, re-

liable access to supplies, and constructive use of OPEC financial re-

sources. Iran has tabled a constructive proposal for developed, devel-

oping, and OPEC cooperation to assist the poorest nations, and is

willing to marry its proposal with our proposal for an IMF Trust Fund

for LDC’s.

In investing its own surplus revenues (which Iran expects will de-

crease substantially, with Iran suffering a deficit by 1977), Iran has

demonstrated a genuine desire to work closely with the US. (A notable

example was its ready agreement to our suggestions on how to handle

the PanAm issue.) We clearly want to encourage an Iranian commit-

ment to consult in a similar fashion before major new investments.



365-608/428-S/80010

August 1974–April 1975 161

An ongoing process of assisting key areas of the Iranian economy

(nuclear energy development, industrial projects, management and

technology needs) building on the Joint Commission, and Robinson’s

relationship with Ansari and Amuzegar, will help strengthen our ties

with the Iranians. At key points, you would want to keep the bureau-

cracy moving to develop specific proposals rather than generalities,

and to be in touch with the Shah to stress the political context within

which we are developing this relationship.



Saudi Arabia

is less able to deliver the other OPEC countries behind

price reductions and other constructive proposals than Yamani likes to

have us believe, but is still the key actor in OPEC. Because of its huge oil

reserves and excess producing capacity it will, for the next several

years, be the one country which can, acting alone, significantly affect

the oil market by increasing or decreasing production. It will also gen-

erate huge payments—half of total OPEC surpluses over the next dec-

ade. As a result, it will have an enormous capacity to reward or punish

developed and developing countries alike through trade and financial

policy. No international agreement on oil pricing or on use of OPEC re-

serves can have any meaning without Saudi support. If, on the other

hand, we can reach agreement with the Saudis on issues of price and

use of financial reserves, other countries will find it extremely difficult

to disrupt the oil or financial market with any degree of success or for

any significant length of time.

The key to dealing with Saudi Arabia in these areas lies in (a) con-

structive participation in Saudi development through the Bilateral

Commission, particularly in improved cooperation between the USG,

Saudi Arabia, and private US firms in manpower training and educa-

tion, industrial development and agriculture, (b) ensuring a safe, prof-

itable outlet for enormous Saudi payments reserves, giving the Saudis a

stake in the health of US and other Western economies and a responsi-

ble role in the international financial system, (c) protecting Saudi Ara-

bia from countries such as Algeria, Iraq and Libya, which can apply po-

litical pressure on the Saudis to take disruptive actions, (d) working

discreetly to obtain parallel if not joint action by Saudi Arabia and Iran

so the two are mutually reinforcing rather than competitive, (e) encour-

aging the Saudis to support constructive positions for the consumer/

producer dialogue, and maintaining an ongoing bilateral dialogue on

economic issues of mutual interest, (f) anticipating and developing con-

structive responses to criticism of Saudi policies such as the boycott, re-

ligious exclusions.

[Omitted here is a section on Egypt.]



Algeria

’s importance results in significant measure from its ideo-

logical leadership role. It has established itself as the policy leader for

the so-called Third World, to the point where even the Saudis and Ira-



365-608/428-S/80010

162 Foreign Relations, 1969–1976, Volume XXXVII

nians have difficulty in opposing outright its demagogic appeals. It is

able to incite other developing countries to engage in inflammatory

rhetoric or to take actions which are disruptive of the established eco-

nomic order. In a political context it can put pressure on other OPEC

countries to use their financial resources as policy instruments of a

harder Arab position vis-a`-vis Israel. And it is able to place substantial

pressure on the Saudis vis-a`-vis Israel. While Boumediene’s depth of

conviction makes it unlikely he can be “bought off,” he is a pragmatist

highly concerned with Algeria’s domestic interests. A strengthening of

our bilateral effort to support Algerian development would to some ex-

tent produce a trade-off in diminished Algerian opposition on world

economic and, perhaps, political issues. Algeria’s strong concern that

we are seeking to push oil prices down to harm its economy, and there-

fore its strong resistance to any policy aimed at lower prices, might also

be allayed by an effort to assist Algerian economic development. While

one cannot but have serious doubts about the wisdom or the viability of

certain aspects of Algeria’s costly and ambitious development policy

(which will lead to a $2 billion trade deficit in 1975) there are areas in

which we could make a limited contribution. We might also find ways

of channeling Saudi and Kuwaiti capital into Algeria. These countries

might see it in their interest to provide capital if it were helpful in bring-

ing about a more constructive Algerian position on international politi-

cal, economic, and energy problems.

Recommendations.

The consumer/producer conference represents a

psychologically important step toward a more constructive relation-

ship with producers as well as an ideal opportunity to begin a dialogue

which can prevent both producers and consumers from taking disrup-

tive actions. Preparations within the USG for the conference should re-

flect not only the views of those immersed in IEA activities but also of

those who are conversant with issues relating to the producers. They

should focus on using the conference to begin a dialogue which places

special emphasis on dealing with the most constructive and moderate

producers in order to strengthen their influence and minimize that of

the more radical countries. In order to do this and to have the best

chance of achieving constructive understandings, the time devoted to

the plenary session should be minimized; the emphasis should be

placed on working groups established to deal with special issues—re-

cycling, investment by producers in developed countries, development

of producer nations, aid to developing countries, long-term security of

oil supply, and a mutually acceptable understanding on oil prices (in-

cluding a dialogue on inflation—i.e., how producers and consumers

can cope with and minimize it—which would avoid commitments to

indexation or unilateral action). In virtually all of the working groups,

the Saudis and Iranians would be able to play the key role. With them



365-608/428-S/80010

August 1974–April 1975 163

we could create a manageable atmosphere conducive to constructive

solutions rather than rhetoric.

Your personal prestige will be called on increasingly to ensure

progress both on bilateral cooperation (which is essential given the ten-

dency of technicians to debate endlessly on many of these issues) and

the multilateral energy and financial issues. Careful preparation and

increased coordination within the USG will be necessary. It would be

extremely useful for Chuck Robinson to assume responsibility for, and

to work directly under you on, supervision and coordination of our

various initiatives with producers. He is in a strong position to coordi-

nate bilateral and multilateral initiatives, to ensure that these initiatives

proceed in step with your political initiatives, and to maintain consis-

tency between our evolving relationships with producers and prepara-

tions for the consumer/producer dialogue. Using the Under Secretaries

Committee and other interagency and intradepartment apparatus,

Robinson is in an excellent position to pull together the various policy

threads and to develop a balance among our economic interests within

your established political framework.



Download 8.4 Mb.

Do'stlaringiz bilan baham:
1   ...   14   15   16   17   18   19   20   21   ...   95




Ma'lumotlar bazasi mualliflik huquqi bilan himoyalangan ©fayllar.org 2020
ma'muriyatiga murojaat qiling