Foreign relations of the united states 1969–1976 volume XXXVII energy crisis, 1974–1980 department of state washington


Paper Prepared in the Department of the Navy


Download 8.4 Mb.
Pdf ko'rish
bet23/95
Sana17.02.2017
Hajmi8.4 Mb.
1   ...   19   20   21   22   23   24   25   26   ...   95

57.

Paper Prepared in the Department of the Navy

1

Washington, undated.



VULNERABILITY OF OIL FIELD FACILITIES—IMPACT ON

CONTINGENCY PLANNING

Attempting to get at the facts of this issue is like an emotional court

case where prosecution and defense lawyers drag in “expert” wit-

nesses who attempt to make the case for each side couched in scientific

terminology.

Shortly after Secretary Kissinger was quoted in Business Week sug-

gesting intervention in the case of strangulation,

2

a series of articles ap-



peared in which “experts” were quoted either making the case that the

facilities were highly vulnerable, or that they were not. Ambassador

Akins prepared a controversial paper

3

arguing it would be impossible



to seize the installations without major sabotage that would put Saudi

fields out of operation for “years.” He introduced his paper stating one

would have to be criminally insane to even contemplate such seizure. It

is rumored that this comment was taken as a personal slap at SecState,

and that it was one of the reasons Akins was fired.

It is a fact that the main 30-inch line of the tapline that carries Saudi

oil to Lebanese ports was blown in the early 1970s by unknown sab-

oteurs. One thousand feet were taken out by the explosion and resul-

tant fire, and it took three months to get the pipeline back in operation.

It was suspected that either Palestinian fedayeen did the job to warn the

SAG to resume payoffs it had terminated, or by the Iraqis to pressure

the SAG to settle outstanding border disputes. The story never got

much publicity, and was never resolved—but the tapline does run

above ground for much of its length, and this incident proved it can be

blown.

1

Source: Washington National Records Center, OSD Files: FRC 330–79–0049, Box



82, Saudi Arabia. Unclassified. Attached to this paper is a note from Rear Admiral Staser

Holcomb to Schlesinger that reads: “You asked about an oil ‘chokepoint’ in Saudi Arabia

. . . it must be the Straits of Hormuz, to which you referred. It is not as vulnerable to

blockage as was suggested, according to the Navy. Point is that the ‘tapline’ piping sys-

tem could serve as an alternate . . . and also more vulnerable. The 4/27 NSC Staff tasking

bears on the question. Tab D.” The “4/27 NSC Staff tasking” refers to this paper. It is un-

known if the White House received this paper.

2

See Document 30.



3

Enclosure to Document 52.



365-608/428-S/80010

208 Foreign Relations, 1969–1976, Volume XXXVII

The Library of Congress did a study for Hamilton Subcommittee

on Investigations of the House Committee on International Relations in

August 1975 which concluded (NESA reference copy attached):

4

—The United States could easily defeat OPEC Armed Forces to



seize oil fields and facilities, but preserving installations intact would

be a chancy proposition under ideal conditions.

—Saboteurs could wreak havoc before adequate forces could seize

control. Although the pipelines are somewhat vulnerable, the oil wells

themselves and pumping stations are far more vulnerable, and are scat-

tered over a core area of 10,000 square miles.

—Once seized and restored, constant security against sabotage

would require two to four divisions with proportionate support on

land, sea, and in the air.

—Soviet intervention is possible through a variety of scenarios

from aerial mining of the Straits of Hormuz, to positioning ground

forces as a counter force.

The Library of Congress Study concluded: “Success would largely

depend on two prerequisites:

—Slight damage to key installations.

—Soviet abstinence from armed intervention.

“Since neither essential could be assured, military operations to

rescue the United States (much less its key allies) from an air-tight

OPEC embargo would combine high costs with high risks wherever we

focused our efforts. This country would so deplete its strategic reserves

that little would be left for contingencies elsewhere. Prospects would

be poor, with plights of far-reaching political, economic, social, psycho-

logical, and perhaps military consequence the penalty for failure.”

The Navy is of the opinion that the Strait of Homuz, though a nat-

ural choke point, is not highly vulnerable to interdiction in that the

channel is sufficiently wide and deep to accept the sinkage of one or

more tankers without impeding the traffic flow. In addition, Iran and

Oman control this Strait and have repeatedly stated their intentions to

protect it.

5

4



The study, “Oil Fields as Military Objectives: A Feasibility Study,” August 21, is

attached but not printed.

5

A CIA paper, “Middle East Pipelines and Choke Points,” undated, is also at-



tached. It highlighted the three pipelines that “would become vital in the event that the

key choke points in seaborne delivery were blocked for whatever reason,” including the

Strait of Hormuz and the Shatt-al-Arab “from which all Iraqi crude and much Iranian

consortium crude leave the Persian Gulf.” The three pipelines were TAPLINE, TIPLINE,

which carried crude from Eilat, Israel, on the Gulf of Aqaba to Ashkellon, Israel on the

Mediterranean, and the pipeline that linked Iraq’s Kirkuk oil fields to the Mediterranean

via Tripoli, Lebanon and Banias, Syria.


365-608/428-S/80010

April 1975–October 1975 209



58.

Letter From President Ford to West German Chancellor

Schmidt

1

Washington, April 29, 1975.



Dear Mr. Chancellor:

I agree with the conviction expressed in your April 21 letter

2

that


the meetings of experts of industralized countries have been extremely

useful and that it is now time to begin arrangements for discussions

with representatives from the major producer countries. We would, of

course, want to make clear from the beginning that this producer-

consumer meeting of experts was completely private and that gov-

ernments would not necessarily be bound by its results.

Your talk with Minister Ansari should help clarify the subjects

which could be fruitfully discussed at such a gathering and elicit Iran’s

suggestions concerning countries that might be represented. Perhaps

after you see the Minister, we should have further contact to coordinate

final preparations for the meeting, including the definitive list of partic-

ipants. George Shultz would continue to represent the United States.

For our part, we are convinced, especially in the wake of the abor-

tive preparatory meeting in Paris, that the industralized countries must

continue to strengthen their cooperative efforts on conservation, finan-

cial solidarity and substitution of domestic for imported energy. In my

view, it is only through such unity of purpose and action by the major

consumers that any discussions, private or governmental, with the pro-

ducers can be productive.

Sincerely,



Gerald R. Ford

1

Source: Ford Library, National Security Adviser, Presidential Correspondence



with Foreign Leaders, Box 2, Germany (FRG)—Chancellor Schmidt (1). No classification

marking. At the bottom of the page is a handwritten note: “Original letter sent to Sonnen-

feldt to deliver to German Embassy, 4/29/75.”

2

Schmidt’s letter is ibid., NSC Europe, Canada, and Ocean Affairs Staff: Conve-



nience Files, Box 69, May–June 1975, European Trip, NATO Summit (1).

365-608/428-S/80010

210 Foreign Relations, 1969–1976, Volume XXXVII



59.

Minutes of the Secretary of State’s Staff Meeting

1

Washington, May 1, 1975, 8:13–9 a.m.



[Omitted here is discussion unrelated to energy.]

Secretary Kissinger: Tom, do you want to say something about the

IEA?

2

Mr. Enders: I think it’s basically a hard line, Mr. Secretary, the two



countries—Japan and Sweden—both—took this week. The alternative

sources and conservation policy showed some signs of withdrawal

symptoms after the failure of the prep.con. The other countries, how-

ever, took quite firmly and directly the line that we must now go ahead

and make sure that we implement the substantive policies that we have

adopted in the past and that we keep the goal of a producer-consumer

dialogue perhaps also—if possible, a consumer-producer meeting—

and at the forefront of the organization try to develop a new means of

achieving it, but recognizing that this is going to be much more difficult

in the future.

They would be looking, of course, very carefully to see what

success the United States has in putting across its own energy program.

Assuming that we have some, I think it will hold all right.

Much of the next month will be spent in preparations for the Min-

isterial. There was very strong sentiment towards trying to deal with

the raw materials-energy link by having the OECD take the lead in the

raw-materials issue—allowing, eventually, for a separate conference,

or series of conferences, on raw materials, first, rather than the link of a

raw materials-energy conference.

Secretary Kissinger: Whose sentiment was that? Yours?

Mr. Enders: I joined it, but it was basically others.

Secretary Kissinger: Like who—Luxembourg? (Laughter.) Whom

did you line up your support to? (Laughter.)

Mr. Eagleburger: Liechtenstein. (Laughter.)

Secretary Kissinger: I just don’t believe that it’s going to go that

way. I think the Europeans are going to edge up, step by step, towards

linking them one way or the other.

Mr. Enders: Well, this—

1

Source: National Archives, RG 59, Transcripts of Secretary of State Kissinger’s



Staff Meetings, Lot 78D443, Box 3, Secretary’s Staff Meetings. Secret. Kissinger presided

over the meeting, which was attended by all the principal officers of the Department or

their designated alternates. A table of contents and list of attendees are not printed.

2

The IEA Governing Board met April 28–29; see footnote 11, Document 56.



365-608/428-S/80010

April 1975–October 1975 211

Secretary Kissinger: They have a compulsive fear of confrontation

and, therefore, thinking that the producers, say, will cause a confronta-

tion—in their mind sooner or later produce one.

Mr. Enders: Well, this was not a proposal which I made or led. In

fact, it was by the Europeans. And I think it gives us something to go

with now.

Mr. Hartman: That was not the experience of that last conference.

They were tougher than we were. I think it will last; but it was a pretty

good performance at the last meeting, I think. Don’t you? (Addresses

Mr. Robinson.)

Secretary Kissinger: Yes, but it won’t last.

Mr. Robinson: Germany has apparently reversed their position, or

appears to be reversing their position a hundred-eighty degrees on that

issue.


Secretary Kissinger: That’s exactly right. That’s my view. And so

will the others.

Mr. Enders: That may be, Mr. Secretary, but I don’t think we

should predict now and write them off, it seems to me—

Secretary Kissinger: I don’t think we should write them off. But I

think we should take a position that’s realistic and that meets our objec-

tives, instead of being the only ones left screaming for energy when

they’re all going the other way. All the more so, when they have never

understood what we have to gain at an energy conference. And we’re

against the energy conference, to begin with. It would be sort of absurd

for us to sort of wind up as the last defense of an energy conference that

everybody else has abandoned. (Laughter.)

Mr. Enders: It was very clear at the IEA meeting that nobody there

wanted to have an energy conference. As a matter of politics, they

thought they had to be all for it and would continue to work in that

direction.

Secretary Kissinger: Like the European Security Conference. For

years everyone has just said it was a matter of politics, and suddenly

they were stuck with it.

Mr. Enders: There was no early action or movement in this direc-

tion, other than in the case of Japanese.

Secretary Kissinger: We’ve got to get a strategy that we can sus-

tain, and we haven’t got it now. What happens if the OECD people put

it into raw materials and OECD and Treasury insists on putting it into

the Five or Ten?

Mr. Enders: Do both.

Secretary Kissinger: What?

Mr. Enders: Do both.



365-608/428-S/80010

212 Foreign Relations, 1969–1976, Volume XXXVII

Secretary Kissinger: But what will happen, in effect?

Mr. Enders: Both will do. Both will do it.

Secretary Kissinger: Both will do it?

Mr. Hartman: 20 has the less developed countries in there. If you

turn that into a debate, you won’t get anything.

The main thing I think the less developed countries have to decide

is what kind of proposals they want to have.

Mr. Robinson: We feel very strongly about the OECD as a vehicle

for bringing in the Industrialized Nations. Simon feels equally strongly,

maybe more. We’ll have a paper outlining the issues.

3

Secretary Kissinger: O.K. Well, thank you.



(Whereupon at 9:00 a.m., the Secretary’s Staff Meeting was

concluded.)

3

Not found.



60.

Paper Prepared in the Department of State

1

Washington, undated.



INTERNATIONAL ENERGY POLICY

I. The International Energy Program—Overview

Our principal policy objective vis-a`-vis the other major oil im-

porting countries continues to be the construction of a comprehensive

framework of cooperation on energy. This effort is designed:

to establish under US leadership a political and economic counter-

weight to OPEC,

rejuvenating consumer country confidence in their

ability to respond to the energy crisis and limiting the corrosive impact

1

Source: Ford Library, National Security Council, Institutional Files, Box 112, Inter-



national Economic Policy Review. Confidential. The Department of State submitted this

paper for the International Economic Policy Review meeting, which took place May 2–3

at the Old Executive Office Building. Secretary of the Treasury Simon chaired the

meeting, and the paper was prepared for the May 2, 11:15 a.m., session, “Energy: Interna-

tional Economic Implications.” The Departments of the Treasury, Defense, and Agricul-

ture, as well as the Federal Energy Administration and the Office of Management and

Budget also contributed papers, all of which are ibid.


365-608/428-S/80010

April 1975–October 1975 213

of the crisis on our overall relationship with other industrialized coun-

tries; and

to accelerate the impact of market forces on both supply and demand

and thereby weaken OPEC’s ability to maintain high prices over the

medium term.

Our efforts in the ECG and later in the IEA have concentrated on

(1) the establishment of an institutional framework for cooperation and

the establishment of an emergency arrangement, and (2) the creation of

a program of long-term cooperation in conservation and accelerated

development of new energy.

A. Emergency Program: The first of these tasks is largely completed.

The International Energy Agency is firmly in place, and the emergency

program is in the final stages of implementation. The emergency pro-

gram is designed to limit in the short-term the political and economic

vulnerability we face as a result of excessive dependence on imported

oil. It offers three major benefits:

political unity: countries are committed in advance to share oil

with any one country which is the target of a selective embargo;

limitation of economic damage: prepositioned demand restraint

programs and emergency supplies greatly enhance our collective

ability to withstand the economic impact of an embargo; and

strategic, diplomatic and military freedom of action: countries that

are better protected against the political and economic disruption of an

embargo thereby also are better protected against the potential military

and diplomatic impact of an embargo, and are better able to retain their

overall strategic freedom of action.

B. Long-Term Cooperation: By itself, however, the emergency pro-

gram would have only limited validity over the medium-term. The IEA

countries have recognized explicitly that a permanent solution to the

problem of vulnerability can only be achieved by reducing dependence

on imported oil.

On the demand side, we have achieved agreement on a 2 MMBD

target for reduced consumption of imported oil by the end of 1975. Sim-

ilar targets will be set for future years. While specific country quotas

were not assigned for 1975, the US share of the overall target is the

1 MMBD saving established in the President’s program. This is roughly

proportional to the US share of total IEA consumption.

On March 20, the IEA Governing Board reached agreement in

principle on a coordinated system of cooperation in the accelerated de-

velopment of new energy supplies.

2

As now agreed, this system will



include:

2

See Document 48.



365-608/428-S/80010

214 Foreign Relations, 1969–1976, Volume XXXVII

—The pooling of national R & D efforts on a project by project

basis;


—Cooperation in providing specific incentives to investors in high

cost energy sources on a project by project basis; and

—Agreement to stimulate and safeguard investment in conven-

tional nuclear and fossil fuel sources through a commitment not to

allow imported oil to be sold domestically at less than a common

agreed price.

The first two of these elements, while of potentially major impor-

tance, are relatively non-controversial. Joint R & D efforts will not only

provide a highly visible vehicle for concrete cooperation but will also

offer significant rationalization of costs. The second tier of cooperation

would permit countries to share in the costs and benefits of synthetic

fuels production and could, in some cases, be a natural follow-on to

R & D cooperation. This element in the overall system is of particular

importance to those IEA countries with little or no indigenous energy

potential (outside nuclear) and who see political and economic value in

having the possibility of access to development of tarsands, shale, coal,

synthetics, etc.

C. Minimum Safeguard Price: This is the key element in the overall

system. Under this agreement, countries would agree for a fixed period

of years not to allow imported oil to be sold domestically at less than a

common, pre-agreed price. This price will be set at a level high enough

to stimulate and safeguard investment in the bulk of conventional nu-

clear and fossil fuel sources.

Process:

The minimum safeguard agreement, together with the

other elements of the overall system is now being elaborated in an IEA

working group. The IEA Governing Board is scheduled to review the

working group’s report and take decisions on all aspects of the pro-

gram by July 1, 1975.

The major issues to be addressed in the USG and the IEA in elabo-

rating the minimum safeguard agreement include:

1) Level—The March 20 discussion specified that the safeguard

price aimed at stimulating and protecting investment in the bulk of con-



ventional sources.

The IEA working group is now elaborating a rough

analysis of the various amounts of new energy (North Sea and North

Slope oil, conventional coal, nuclear, etc.) estimated to be available at

various price levels. (FEA is supplying up-dated cost estimates for the

US.)


In the final analysis, however, the range of choice is not likely to be

very wide. There is general agreement that the level should not be so

low as to be trivial. On the other hand, there are strong political impera-

tives in all countries (including the U.S.) against setting a very high

price.


365-608/428-S/80010

April 1975–October 1975 215

2) Mechanisms: The March 20 agreement specifies that countries

would be free to use measures of their own choice to mention

[maintain?] the safeguard price, e.g. tariff, variable levy, quota, etc. The

IEA Working Group is analyzing the trade and general economic im-

plications of various measures with a view toward drawing up an

agreed list from which countries could choose.

3) Timing: We will have to decide prior to July 1 whether we want

to push for the prompt establishment of a maximum safeguard com-

mitment, including the fixing of the level, or whether we would prefer

to establish a standby commitment, leaving countries to establish the

necessary mechanism only if the price actually breaks. There may be

some argument for a standby type agreement, on the grounds that

mechanisms, level, etc. can better be chosen when the medium-term

market outlook clarifies.

On the other hand, the effectiveness of the safeguard price as a

stimulus to investment would be weakened if the commitment to pro-

vide protection against imported oil is not explicit. Also, it would be

considerably more difficult to obtain agreement in the future on a level

sufficiently high to limit the risk of our giving a “free ride” to the Euro-

peans and Japanese if the world price begins to decline.

4) Legislative requirements: The type of agreement we seek will

probably require specific Congressional authorization. (The Executive

may in fact have adequate statutory power to maintain a safeguard

price, but Congress clearly expects the opportunity to review the pro-

gram in detail.) Title IX of the Energy Independence Act

3

would pro-



vide adequate legislative authority. The timing and strategy of a con-

certed push for this legislation will have to be carefully assessed over

the next few months.

III. Relations with Oil Producers: Over the past year, we have con-

centrated on intensified bilateral contracts with key producer gov-

ernments. Our principal objective has been to maximize our political

and economic leverage by increasing the vested interests of these coun-

tries in strong bilateral ties with the U.S.

Until recently, we have been in a holding pattern on a multilateral

dialogue, arguing successfully that consumer solidarity was an essen-

tial pre-condition to any multilateral producer/consumer dialogue.

With the completion of the overall framework of consumer cooperation

in March, we agreed to move to a preparatory meeting to lay the

ground for a formal producer/consumer conference.

A. Prepcon: The preparatory meeting of April 7–15 reached an im-

passe over the basic issue of the scope of the formal conference. The US,

3

See footnote 3, Document 33.



365-608/428-S/80010

216 Foreign Relations, 1969–1976, Volume XXXVII

EC, and Japan maintained that the conference should be centered on

energy, covering as well a number of issues directly and indirectly re-

lated to energy. The seven OPEC/LDC delegations, acting as a single

bloc, insisted that the conference must give equal treatment to other

raw materials and problems of economic development as well as

energy.


The two most significant conclusions to be drawn from the experi-

ence of the preparatory meeting are:

1) OPEC (particularly the more radical elements such as Algeria,

Venezuela, and Libya) has little interest in discussing energy and will

use the LDC issue to deflect such discussions. Thus, the strong OPEC/

LDC alliance will make it very difficult to engage in an effective multi-

lateral dialogue on energy, even agreement on our part to move for-

ward simultaneously on other raw materials and development might

not guarantee a substantive dialogue on energy.

2) Our efforts to achieve consumer solidarity have paid off. The

consumers maintained an impressive unity at the prepcon. But there

continues a strong desire among consumers for some sort of dialogue

with producers, and unless we can devise some sort of multilateral

mechanism for such contracts we risk seeing other consumers show

new interest in the bilateral route.

B. Where Next: With the failure of the prepcon, the multilateral dia-

logue is at least temporarily checked. We will of course continue on the

bilateral track and may find that our position with some of the key pro-

ducers such as Iran and Saudi Arabia has been enhanced as a result of

the failure of the prepcon. These producers have a real interest in dis-

cussing investment issues, for example, while the Algerians and Vene-

zuelans are not going to acquire a significant stake in the industrialized

countries’ economies.

However, we must also address the question of producer/

consumer relations within the context of our objectives with other con-

sumers. While other IEA countries supported the US, EC, and Japanese

decision to hold fast to the notion of an energy-centered conference

which was the major reason for the failure of the prepcon, the failure of

the prepcon does leave a major gap in the IEA program. Therefore,

there may be considerable pressure in the IEA to move forward directly

in the establishment of a dialogue with producers, although the pro-

ducers will reject this. More likely, we can expect pressure to agree to

reconvene the prepcon, even at the price of agreeing to a much broader

conference agenda than we were previously willing to accept.

We plan to pursue two parallel courses to meet this situation:

1. Isolation of Raw Materials Question—We will continue to stress

willingness to participate in an energy centered conference. We will

quietly resist reconvening the prepcon in the near future. We will use



365-608/428-S/80010

April 1975–October 1975 217

this time to move forward with our internal reassessment of raw mate-

rials policy, concerting our views with other industrialized countries in

the OECD and with the more responsible members of the OPEC at the

right time. We will then attempt to place the raw materials issue on a

separate track, and then return to the question of a producer/consumer

conference focused on energy-related matters. If coordinated bilateral

discussions with key producers indicate an energy-centered conference

can be held, we could proceed with a second try at it.

2. Coordination and Targeting of Bilaterals through the IEA—In order

to satisfy IEA demands for a more active role vis-a`-vis the producers,

we will propose a process of closer IEA coordination of bilateral con-

tracts with producers. We could attempt to agree on a common set of

objectives and modalities for bilateral policies in selected areas of the

producer/consumer relationship. Two possibly promising areas for

such an approach are accelerated industrialization of producer country

economies and aid to the MSA’s.

This approach would have several advantages:

—it would give internal political content to the IEA position in the

producer/consumer relationship;

—if properly structured, it need not restrict US flexibility in bilat-

eral relations with key producers; and

—it would help to ensure that the failure of the prepcon does not

cause a loss of IEA political momentum in other areas such as

long-term cooperation.



Download 8.4 Mb.

Do'stlaringiz bilan baham:
1   ...   19   20   21   22   23   24   25   26   ...   95




Ma'lumotlar bazasi mualliflik huquqi bilan himoyalangan ©fayllar.org 2020
ma'muriyatiga murojaat qiling