Foreign relations of the united states 1969–1976 volume XXXVII energy crisis, 1974–1980 department of state washington


Telegram From the Department of State to the Embassy in


Download 8.4 Mb.
Pdf ko'rish
bet26/95
Sana17.02.2017
Hajmi8.4 Mb.
1   ...   22   23   24   25   26   27   28   29   ...   95

66.

Telegram From the Department of State to the Embassy in

France

1

Washington, June 14, 1975, 2152Z.



139949. Subject: Message for Sauvagnargues.

1. Please transmit the following message to Foreign Minister Sau-

vagnargues at earliest convenience:

“Dear Jean:

A representative from your Embassy here was in touch with us last

Monday


2

concerning your concept of moving directly to an enlarged

Ministerial meeting of 27 countries as a means of relaunching the

dialogue on energy, commodities, and other development issues.

Since then I have had a report of the conversation between Messrs.

Froment-Meurice

3

and Robinson.



I have given your concept considerable thought. In order to enable

us to proceed in close cooperation I thought it might be helpful if I put

our own thoughts before you.

I recognize your desire to build on the discussions at Kleber in

April,

4

but wonder if there was really sufficient agreement to do so.



There was only a tentative understanding on a 26 or 27 member group,

and on its division between energy producing countries, developing

countries, and industrial countries. The whole was at that time condi-

tioned on agreement on an agenda, and on such contentious issues as

the status of the International Energy Agency observers. To attempt

now through bilateral contacts to establish a basis for agreement on

who the 27 would be, on the representation of the Agency, and on what

the 27 would do strikes me as an impossibly difficult task.

But even if it could succeed, I believe there would be a real ques-

tion as to its utility. An enlarged conference of this type would be

tempted to get into the substance of issues, and to try to set up some

way of leveraging issues one against the other. A large conference

would be tempted to perpetuate itself, subordinating the commissions

to its governance. We could thus have all too easily a mini-UN and the

ingredients for a new failure.

1

Source: Ford Library, National Security Adviser, Presidential Country Files for



Europe and Canada, Box 4, France—State Department Telegrams from SECSTATE–

NODIS (3). Secret; Immediate; Nodis. Drafted by Enders and approved by Kissinger.

2

June 9.


3

Henri Froment-Meurice, Chief of the Asian Division of the French Foreign

Ministry.

4

The Kle´ber Conference Center in Paris, where the April 7–15 Prepcon took place.



365-608/428-S/80010

236 Foreign Relations, 1969–1976, Volume XXXVII

It seems to me far more prudent to build on Kleber by reconvening

the preparatory conference in the same format. After all, the 10 partici-

pants agreed that they were not ending their effort, but only sus-

pending it. Although not free of controversy, this forum has the merit

of existing; participants in it could very probably agree to reconvene it

with a minimum of negotiation.

I recognize the point that has been made to us by many of the pro-

ducing countries that legitimacy of commissions created by only 10

countries might be contested, notably by developing countries that did

not participate in Kleber. To overcome that point, which I believe valid,

the correct solution would appear to be that proposed by Yamani: To

use the preparatory meeting to agree on the whole process, the mem-

bership of the commissions, their terms of reference, their status

vis-a`-vis each other, and then to convene a 1 or 2 day meeting of For-

eign Ministers to launch them.

A further point that has been raised by some, that there should be

an arrangement for the commissions to report back, seems to me to

have much less force. Countries that are concerned that the work of the

commissions should proceed more or less at the same pace, can satisfy

themselves that this is so by arrangements for the commission

chairmen to report to each other the progress of their work. But to re-

port back to the enlarged Ministerial meeting would suppose that the

Ministerial meeting would have to be held again, and that it will have

to deal with substantive issues. I do not think we should commit our-

selves now to such a substantive membership meeting at Ministerial

level.


Please let me know your thoughts on this issue,

5

as I think that



there is a strong advantage to both of us to remain in close harmony as

the dialogue develops. I hope in any event to see you soon.

[Omitted here is material unrelated to a producer-consumer

conference.]



Kissinger

5

The French Embassy delivered Sauvagnargues’s reply to Kissinger on June 23.



The Foreign Minister wrote that France had “no preconceived idea” regarding procedure

and was “prepared to support what will be likely to receive general approval in condi-

tions suited not only to ensure the resumption, but above all to guarantee the pursuit and

continuation, of the dialogue.” However, he added, he was “thoroughly convinced of the

need for an approach that is both global and differentiated.” On the subject of establishing

“three committees of actually unequal status whose results could no longer be com-

pared,” he did not think the formula would “receive the approval of the developing

countries which will inevitably interpret it in terms of priority for energy.” Furthermore,

in terms of the conference’s composition, he argued that Kissinger’s “reasoning against

the 27 formula is equally applicable to the 10 formula.” (Telegram 151916 to Cairo, June

27; National Archives, RG 59, Central Foreign Policy Files, P850036–2564)


365-608/428-S/80010

April 1975–October 1975 237



67.

Memorandum of Conversation

1

Washington, June 16, 1975, 10:25–10:50 a.m.



PARTICIPANTS

Dr. Henry A. Kissinger, Secretary of State and Assistant to the President for

National Security Affairs

Alan Greenspan, Chairman, Council of Economic Advisers

Charles W. Robinson, Under Secretary of State for Economic Affairs

Lt. Gen. Brent Scowcroft, Deputy Assistant to the President for National Security

Affairs

SUBJECT


Bilateral Oil Agreement with Iran

Kissinger: The President wanted me to discuss something we have

been discussing with Iran. This is for you only and is highly sensitive.

When I saw the Shah in March [May],

2

he complained his liftings



were falling and he had 500,000 barrels a day excess. I said that under

specific conditions we might take it off their hands. Chuck [Robinson]

3

has discussed it further with them and they have now gone up to



700,000 barrels a day. They would sell to us for Treasury notes with a

forgiveness period. The notes could be redeemed for the purchase of

American goods.

I am interested in this idea because, number one, it breaks the

OPEC front because it shifts the surplus.

Greenspan: It would have to be at Saudi expense, and they

wouldn’t like it. How long would it be for?

Kissinger: It’s up to us. Second, it would make it harder to raise the

prices. Third, it’s insurance against another embargo. Fourth, it puts

pressure on the suppliers.

There are two possible schemes. The first one is that we pay the

market price for oil. The other is to sell at current prices plus an adjust-

ment tied to the wholesale price index.

Greenspan: That breaks the OPEC price structure.

Kissinger: If they give us a forgiveness feature, one year gives us $1

dollar discount.

1

Source: Ford Library, National Security Adviser, Memoranda of Conversations,



Box 12. Secret; Nodis. The meeting was held in the Secretary’s office in the White House.

2

See footnote 3, Document 62.



3

Brackets in the original.



365-608/428-S/80010

238 Foreign Relations, 1969–1976, Volume XXXVII

Greenspan: If we could keep Iran at full production it puts severe

pressure on the Saudis. We would want to insure that Iran would not

cut back elsewhere.

Robinson: They could but that obviously is not their scheme. They

want to keep their revenue up.

The basic scheme is a barter. If they contract way out for oil, they

need the assurance that the price will go up in line with other goods

they would buy. By either scheme—the OPEC price, or the current

price plus the wholesale price index (so long as it didn’t go above

OPEC). We would give them Treasury notes without interest for the

first year and that are non-negotiable for the first year. So for the first

year we would have $2 billion in our hands.

This will take imagination and a change in how we operate.

Greenspan: So in effect you have $2 billion in escrow. So if they

broke the deal or entered an embargo, we have the $2 billion.

Robinson: We get a discount. We will have to establish a specific

arrangement, which can go far to break OPEC.

Greenspan: When this gets out . . . the only real issue is price. It

would be crucial that the price not escalate beyond the OPEC price.

Robinson: I think I got that, but I haven’t nailed that down yet.

Greenspan: It seems obvious that if you look at 1978 at these prices,

the Saudis are the only ones who will not be a net borrower. The others

are committing funds at such a rate. The 700,000 barrels by itself won’t

do it. But as a symbol . . . The Saudi reaction will be important.

Kissinger: Will the companies give us trouble because the Saudis

will be upset?

Greenspan: The idea properly packaged seems very attractive. Let

me think about it. An essential ingredient is not to let the price go above

the OPEC price. I will think on the negative elements, but I am

intrigued.

Robinson: There are two alternatives: a government purchase to be

auctioned off, or we could buy it for the Navy reserve and so on.

Greenspan: We can buy it for the stockpile. We are talking about a

$1 billion stockpile, but we don’t have the Salt Dome capacity. Maybe

you can solve the company problem by having them take the oil.

The notes would have to be non-negotiable. Have you looked at

the different interest rates?

Robinson: It is about $1 a barrel at the current interest rates. I am

thinking of a five-year maturity with no interest if they don’t use it for

equipment.

Kissinger: Another option is to lower the interest rate and have no

forgiveness. How will it look to our IEA partners? It really helps them.



365-608/428-S/80010

April 1975–October 1975 239

Robinson: But we must be careful how we do it.

Greenspan: It will have a devastating impact on OPEC. So you

want the maximum apparent price concession.

Robinson: Iran insists that the non-negotiable aspect be covered by

a side letter, as well as the price not going above OPEC.

Kissinger: I know we would like the greatest apparent price differ-

ential . . . The side letters will look . . . the Saudis will be very upset.

Greenspan: If you then have the same deal with the Saudis, I

would not favor it. Because then OPEC becomes Saudi.

Kissinger: That is a separate issue. Let the Saudis worry about that.

Robinson: It would be politically difficult to say we do it with Iran

but won’t for the Saudis.

Greenspan: Let me think it through. The critical thing is what

happens in 1980, with Iran and with or without the Saudis. We may

need a total strategy before we move.

Kissinger: I think we should pick up what we can and develop a

total strategy after Iran is signed up.

4

[The meeting ended]



4

On June 23, Kissinger, Greenspan, and Robinson met with Zarb at the Department

of State to discuss the idea of a bilateral oil deal with Iran. Zarb said that while he liked

the idea as a “possible way to crack the oil cartel,” he thought “the notion of a gov-

ernment agency handling this sort of matter is inconceivable and inconsistent with our

idea of a free enterprising system.” The three agreed that they did not want Congress too

deeply involved in the matter, with Zarb saying that “getting into a legislative process”

would mean that the administration “would lose control.” Regardless, Zarb believed that

they should proceed with the deal, and Kissinger and Robinson added that, if they did so,

the price that the United States paid to Iran could not “ever exceed the OPEC price.” (Na-

tional Archives, RG 59, Records of Henry Kissinger, Lot 91D414, Box 15, Miscellaneous

Documents, 1975, Folder 2)



365-608/428-S/80010

240 Foreign Relations, 1969–1976, Volume XXXVII



68.

Telegram From the Department of State to Secretary of State

Kissinger

1

Washington, July 2, 1975, 2016Z.



Tosec 50095/156455. Subject: Producer/Consumer Dialogue.

1. My recent discussions on the producer-consumer dialogue with

Yamani in Saudi Arabia and Yeganeh, Ansary, and the Shah in Iran

have been reported by separate telegrams.

2

Based on these discussions,



I believe that we could reach agreement in principle with Saudi Arabia

and Iran on the following approach:

2. Basic plan: Group of 10 to meet first with the same level of repre-

sentation as at the April Prepcon, and agree on all the important ques-

tions cited below before giving way to the group of 27 at the Ministerial

level. The larger group would formally launch the three commissions

on energy, other commodities, assistance to least developed countries.

3. Important questions—to be resolved in advance:

(A) Enlarged launching group: It appears that we will likely end

up with 27 participants—8 industrialized nations, 8 OPEC and 11

LDC’s—to be selected by the respective groups. The chairman of the

group of 27 should be from a neutral country (not France), rotated

amongst the 3 participating groups, or possibly from the UN.

(B) Commissions: Three separate commissions to be formed on en-

ergy, other commodities and least developed countries relations with

financial and monetary questions to be considered in each. (Hopefully

Yamani’s demand for a separate commission on finance and monetary

matters can be resolved by agreeing to set up a sub-committee under

the energy commission.)

(C) Commission participants: Participants in each commission to

be selected from among the group of 27 countries by use of objective

criteria modified as may be required to meet anticipated political pres-

sure. (These criteria would justify US membership in all three commis-

sions but preclude multiple membership for most of the 27.)

(D) Guidelines for commission programs: General outline of the

scope of each commission’s activities to be set for them based largely on

1

Source: National Archives, RG 59, Central Foreign Policy Files, P850036–2256. Se-



cret; Immediate; Nodis. Drafted and approved by Robinson. Kissinger was in the Virgin

Islands to meet with Israeli officials.

2

Robinson’s June 29 meeting with Yamani in Jidda was reported in telegram 6252



from Tehran, June 30. His June 11 meeting with Ansary was reported in telegram 15112

from USOECD Paris, June 11, and his June 30 meeting with him and Iranian Central Bank

Governor Yeganeh was reported in telegram 6260 from Tehran, June 30. (All ibid.,

D750226–0501, P850061–1762, D750226–0506)



365-608/428-S/80010

April 1975–October 1975 241

the draft agenda considered at the April Prepcon; more detailed

agendas to be developed by each commission. Each commission would

proceed at its own individual pace reflecting the nature of its tasks and

relationships with other international fora operating in the same field.

(E) Commission linkage: Some form of regular contact will be

maintained between commissions and with other fora dealing with

these subjects. In spite of our continuing opposition, it appears likely

that most governments will insist on some arrangement for progress

reports back to the group of 27. In this event, we should push for a loose

arrangement without fixed schedules and with agreement that there is

to be no substantive debate in the group of 27 so as to prevent its be-

coming a mini-UN. (Both Saudi Arabia and Iran would support this

restriction.)

4. Anticipated schedule:

(A) Announcement: The plan for resumption of the producer-

consumer dialogue and the date of the Group of 10 meeting to be an-

nounced not later than August so as to precede and influence the

UNGA Special Session commencing September 1 and the OPEC meet-

ing commencing September 24.

(B) Group of 10 meeting: To take place in Paris in early October

(Yamani is still pushing for August, but Iran firmly supports our view

that more time is required for careful preparation).

(C) Group of 27 Ministerial: To take place (at a site to be decided) in

December (at least 30–60 days after the Group of 10 meeting to allow

for selection of the 17 additional participants, issuance of invitations

and conclusion of detailed arrangements).

5. The foregoing represents my judgment as to the basis on which

Saudi Arabia and Iran would support resumption of the producer-

consumer dialogue. My meetings with Venezuela, Brazil (and possibly

Algeria) during early and mid-July could indicate the desirability of

some change in this plan to ensure the support of these key developing

countries which we would want before proceeding with this program.



Ingersoll

365-608/428-S/80010

242 Foreign Relations, 1969–1976, Volume XXXVII



69.

Minutes of the Secretary of State’s Staff Meeting

1

Washington, July 7, 1975, 8–8:57 a.m.



[Omitted here is discussion unrelated to energy.]

Mr. Enders: We have, I think, a pretty difficult situation in the

IEA,

2

Mr. Secretary. We managed to make some headway on the alter-



native sources policy. But I think the real concern is whether there’s go-

ing to be enough headway over the next six months to keep the organi-

zation moving. And I’ll be submitting to you a couple of letters to the

British and the Germans on this subject.

3

Secretary Kissinger: Yes. I’ll talk to the President about it on the



basis of your cable.

4

That doesn’t propose any course of action, but I



told him what is happening. What’s the reason for the slowdown?

Mr. Enders: Well, one is we’re up against real problems. For ex-

ample, the Japanese have got to come up with five million dollars to

build up stocks from 60 to 90 days.

The alternative sources thing is very expensive. There’s a lot of op-

position from the oil countries, as there is here.

The other thing is that we have particular problems in Italy and

Japan. The Italians want to be bought off. They want foreign financing

for their nuclear program. And I think that it will be in our commer-

cial—and I believe in our political—interest to be responsive to that at

1

Source: National Archives, RG 59, Transcripts of Secretary of State Kissinger’s



Staff Meetings, Lot 78D443, Box 3, Secretary’s Staff Meetings. Secret. Kissinger presided

over the meeting, which was attended by all the principal officers of the Department or

their designated alternates. A table of contents and list of attendees are not printed.

2

The IEA Governing Board met in Paris June 30–July 2. The highlights of the ses-



sions are in telegram 17267 from USOECD Paris, July 3. (Ibid., Central Foreign Policy

Files, D750231–0004) The decisions reached by the Governing Board on long-term coop-

eration, as printed in a Secretariat paper, are in telegram 17238 from USOECD Paris, July

2. (Ibid., D750229–0987) The Governing Board’s working paper on “considerations for re-

suming the producer-consumer dialogue” is in telegram 158819 to Algiers and other

posts, July 4. (Ibid., D750232–1177)

3

Not found.



4

On July 2, Enders reported to Kissinger on the IEA Governing Board meetings. At

the end of the telegram, Enders concluded: “My strategy is to try to maneuver the IEA

into a straight up or down vote on all the substantive issues by year-end, in the hope the

Japanese and Italians won’t have the guts to break ranks. If OPEC is bloody-minded and

puts the price up a lot in September, this approach has a fair chance of succeeding. But to

make it work we have to be seen to be ready to break out of all new IEA commitments

and go it alone. I am prepared to take that position because IEA will be a paper organiza-

tion unless it does make progress in these fields; it will be so perceived (that is already a

danger, and failure to meet our July 1 deadline for alternative sources doesn’t help), and

thus of less utility to us than heretofore.” (Telegram 17130 from USOECD Paris; National

Archives, RG 59, Central Foreign Policy Files, P840125–2606)



365-608/428-S/80010

April 1975–October 1975 243

the right time, because they’ll need to show movement towards

independence.

The Japanese, basically—they’re in the position they’ve been in

since the very start. They want it both ways. They want good relations

with the producers. They don’t want to have a domestic energy policy

even less than some of the others. They’d like to kind of wait this one

out. On the other hand, they’re responsive to group pressure. So we’ve

got to orchestrate a circumstance in which the Japanese don’t have the

guts to stand up to it.

Secretary Kissinger: Yes, but what do we ask in these letters?

Mr. Enders: Well, the letters simply suggest, (1), indicate to the

British and the Germans, that unless we speed the thing up and make—

Secretary Kissinger: Will you give me a more detailed paper on ex-

actly what the issues are so that I can raise it when I see Schmidt?

5

But I


have to know what I’m asking them to do rather than speed the thing

up—


Mr. Enders: Yes.

Secretary Kissinger: —and what, concretely, do we want them to

do?

Mr. Enders: Well, what we want them to do is to support us for



going to an overall package deal.

Secretary Kissinger: But can you put it on paper, what an overall

package deal is?

Mr. Enders: Yes.

[Omitted here is discussion unrelated to energy.]

5

The paper was not found. Ford, Kissinger, and Scowcroft met with Schmidt in



Bonn on July 27. According to the memorandum of conversation, July 27, the Chancellor

said: “We would react negatively in Europe to a confrontation with OPEC. If oil prices go

up, it eventually benefits the U.S. and the Soviet Union who are rich in raw materials. But

there is no chance for Europe, who could not stand a confrontation. They need stable

prices and assured supply.” Kissinger and Schmidt agreed that they should try to split

the OPEC nations as well as the “poor non-oil countries” from OPEC. (Ford Library, Na-

tional Security Adviser, Memoranda of Conversations, Box 14) At another meeting on

July 28, Schmidt said that he and Giscard wanted to propose that “the OPEC discussion

be kept in the Foreign Ministries and not be scattered among the different ministries.” He

also recommended that “the invitations for the dialogue” go out before the next OPEC

meeting to “show that something was being done and give the Saudis an argument for

trying to postpone a price rise, at least until the year end.” (Ibid.)



365-608/428-S/80010

244 Foreign Relations, 1969–1976, Volume XXXVII



Download 8.4 Mb.

Do'stlaringiz bilan baham:
1   ...   22   23   24   25   26   27   28   29   ...   95




Ma'lumotlar bazasi mualliflik huquqi bilan himoyalangan ©fayllar.org 2020
ma'muriyatiga murojaat qiling