Foreign relations of the united states 1969–1976 volume XXXVII energy crisis, 1974–1980 department of state washington


Telegram From the Department of State to the Embassy in


Download 8.4 Mb.
Pdf ko'rish
bet27/95
Sana17.02.2017
Hajmi8.4 Mb.
1   ...   23   24   25   26   27   28   29   30   ...   95

70.

Telegram From the Department of State to the Embassy in

Belgium

1

Washington, July 15, 1975, 0018Z.



165677. Subject: Status of Preparations for Resumption of Producer-

Consumer Dialogue.

1. Please pass following message to Davignon from Assistant Sec-

retary Enders.

2. I want to give you our assessment of the current state of play on

the resumption of the dialogue following our talks with the French

during Secretary Kissinger’s visit to Paris last Thursday.

2

3. The French now agree that the dialogue should resume with a



second meeting of the Kleber group. This meeting would be followed

by a conference at Ministerial level of the 27 countries tentatively

agreed upon in April. Both meetings would be short, thoroughly pre-

pared, and with the purpose of establishing 3 commissions on energy,

raw materials, and development.

4. On the question of timing, the French have come around to the

view that it is not feasible to try to reconvene the preparatory meeting

before the UN Special Session. They showed some initial preference for

a meeting before the September OPEC session, but I believe they now

agree that this is also impracticable and that we should aim for early

October. They would share the IEA view that there should be some an-

nouncement of the reconvening of the preparatory meeting and subse-

quent timetable before the UN Special Session, i.e. before the end of

August. On this basis, we would announce within the next several

weeks that the preparatory meeting would reconvene in early October.

The Ministerial meeting would follow within approximately 60 days

and the commissions could begin their work before the end of the year.

5. On the basis of our bilateral talks with the Iranians, Saudis, Ven-

ezuelans, and Brazilians, we are confident that this general approach

1

Source: National Archives, RG 59, Central Foreign Policy Files, P850036–2610. Se-



cret; Immediate; Nodis; Stadis. Drafted by Bosworth, cleared by Roger A. Sorenson (E)

and Preeg, and approved by Enders. Repeated Immediate to USOECD Paris.

2

Kissinger met with Sauvagnargues in Paris on July 9. They agreed that by the end



of August, before the next OPEC meeting and before the UN Special Session, they should

announce that they recommended the resumption of a producer/consumer dialogue.

They also discussed establishing one commission to tackle commodity issues, which

Kissinger said the United States preferred “except for energy.” Kissinger also said that by

the time of the UN meeting, the U.S. Government would overcome internal differences

and settle on a unified commodity policy. (Ibid., Records of Henry Kissinger, Lot 91D414,

Box 11, Classified External Memoranda of Conversations, July 1975) Kissinger also met

with Giscard, and their discussion is described in telegram 17951 from Paris, July 10.

(Ibid., Central Foreign Policy Files, P840084–1763)


365-608/428-S/80010

April 1975–October 1975 245

on procedure and timing will be acceptable to them. However, there

are still some key points which remain to be resolved both with the

French and with the Seven. On the question of participation, the French

are somewhat vague about our earlier understanding reached in April

that the 19 LDCs represented at the conference of 27 would include 8

OPEC members. We believe this is an important condition and one

which we must nail down before convening a second Prepcon. The

French also want to leave the question of membership on the commis-

sions themselves in the hands of the two groups (the 8 industrialized

representatives and the 19 LDCs). We continue to prefer objective crite-

ria for determining membership on the commissions, and have re-

ceived tentative endorsement of this approach from Venezuela.

6. On the critical question of the autonomy of the commissions and

whether they will report back to a second conference of the 27, the

French are now talking in terms of a “stock taking” meeting of the 27

some 6 months after the first meeting and the launching of the commis-

sions. They argue that this second meeting can be kept both short and

procedural in nature. We continue to have reservations on this score. If

the large conference can meet every six months, soon it will be meeting

for six months at a time and will have practically preempted the dia-

logue, thereby condemning it to sterility. But we recognize that pres-

sure is building for some kind of a schedule, and this is a key issue we

will want to discuss at the next Governing Board meeting.

7. The role of the IEA in the resumed dialogue is also still at issue.

In our view, agreement to reconvene the preparatory meeting in the

same format means by definition that the IEA will be present as an ob-

server. We can seek through previous negotiation to establish the cos-

metics of this presence in such a way as to minimize the possibilities for

confrontation with the Algerians. But we can not agree to exclude the

IEA from the preparatory meeting. As for the Ministerial meeting of 27,

we should consider in the IEA whether in fact IEA presence is required

since the scope of that meeting would cover all economic relations

between industrialized and developing countries. On the other hand,

the IEA must be present as an observer with the right to speak in the

energy commission.

8. The French have told us that they plan to circulate soon to the

Group of Ten a paper

3

laying out what in their judgment could be a



basis for resuming the dialogue. This would be the vehicle through

which agreement among the Ten would be crystallized and assurance

obtained against another failure. If we receive the French paper before

the July 28 Governing Board meeting, we would not plan to respond to

3

Not found.



365-608/428-S/80010

246 Foreign Relations, 1969–1976, Volume XXXVII

it formally until after we have had an opportunity for full IEA consulta-

tion at that meeting. In the meantime, we will continue our bilateral

contacts with the Seven, and Under Secretary Robinson now plans to

visit Algeria during the week of July 21.

9. At the July 28 Governing Board meeting, I think we should try to

reach agreement on the timetable as well as the basic questions of

format and procedure. In particular, I think we will have to reach a po-

sition on the “reporting back” issue which I view as the key unresolved

point.

4

10. I will be sending you another message later this week on our



proposals for moving ahead at the July 28 meeting on both long term

cooperation and the emergency system. I believe it is particularly im-

portant on the former that we make steady progress toward our De-

cember 1 date, narrowing each of the key issues in each meeting as we

did during the ECG negotiation of the IEP itself.

5

Ingersoll

4

According to a message from Enders to Kissinger, at the July 28 IEA Governing



Board meeting, “consultations with other members” of the Board on resuming the

producer/consumer dialogue “went according to plan.” “No substantive objections”

were raised to the proposals that the United States had given to France, Enders wrote. He

added that the “main focus of discussion” was the IEA’s role in the dialogue, and that the

Board agreed with the U.S. position that 1) the IEA “should be present” at the new prep-

con on the “same basis as before,” but “would not ask to speak”; and 2) the IEA would

“be asked to participate as an observer in the energy commission” with the “right to

speak.” Japan and Italy worried that the United States had not mentioned IEA participa-

tion in consultation with oil producers and wanted to be sure that IEA participation

would not become a “make-or-break issue” upon the dialogue’s resumption. (Telegram

19570 from USOECD Paris, July 28; National Archives, RG 59, Central Foreign Policy

Files, P840125–2598)

5

Davignon replied that “in general” he agreed with the U.S. position and that he



was “particularly pleased with the Department’s views on IEA participation at the sec-

ond preparatory meeting and on the energy commission.” (Telegram 6417 from Brussels,

July 15; ibid., P850081–2024)


365-608/428-S/80010

April 1975–October 1975 247



71.

Telegram From the Department of State to the Embassy in

France

1

Washington, July 24, 1975, 1425Z.



174416. Subject: Message for Sauvagnargues.

1. Please transmit the following message to Foreign Minister

Sauvagnargues:

“Dear Jean:

I understand that, as a result of the several discussions between Di-

rector of Economic Affairs Froment-Meurice and Under Secretary Rob-

inson during the past few days,

2

we appear to have resolved the re-



maining questions regarding resumption of the producer/consumer

dialogue. I have also learned from Under Secretary Robinson that, al-

though the Algerians continue to hold some reservations regarding the

plan, they are now prepared to support our initiative on this basis.

3

To avoid any possible misunderstanding we reconfirm our will-



ingness to proceed with this dialogue—and have also obtained agree-

ment from most of the key participants in the original Group of Ten—

on the basis of the four-stage approach outlined below:

1. The Group of Ten which met in Paris in April to reconvene again

in Paris on October 6 for a meeting to establish the basis for selection of

an additional seventeen participants, thereby expanding the group to

twenty-seven. Eight would be from the industrialized nations and

nineteen from developing nations, of which eight will be members of

OPEC. The industrialized and developing nations will each select their

additional members on a basis assuring a properly representative ex-

panded group.

The Group of Ten will also agree on the formation of three com-

missions to deal with the problems of (A) energy, (B) other commod-

ities, and (C) development—each with not more than fifteen partici-

pants selected from the group of twenty-seven.

In addition, the Group of Ten will select the site for the meeting

of the enlarged Group of Twenty-Seven, presumably Geneva or

Paris, and the chairman for that meeting which could be from a

1

Source: National Archives, RG 59, Central Foreign Policy Files, P850038–1826. Se-



cret; Flash; Nodis. Drafted by Robinson; cleared by Sonnenfeldt, Enders, Hartman, and

Preeg; and approved by Kissinger.

2

The July 24 conversation between Robinson and Froment-Meurice is summarized



in a July 24 memorandum from the Under Secretary to Kissinger. (Ibid., P830152–1204)

3

Telegram 1640 from Algiers, July 21, contains an account of Robinson’s meeting



with Boumediene. (Ibid., Central Foreign Policy Files P860035–0233)

365-608/428-S/80010

248 Foreign Relations, 1969–1976, Volume XXXVII

neutral country, or a revolving arrangement acceptable to the Group

of Ten.


2. The Group of Twenty-Seven will meet thirty to sixty days later

at the site selected and after the additional seventeen participants have

been selected and formally invited. This will be a short two-day

meeting at Ministerial level. Its primary objective will be to confirm the

decisions reached at the Group of Ten meeting for establishment of (A)

three separate commissions, (B) brief guidelines for commission work,

and (C) reporting-back procedures.

3. The three commissions will be formed on the basis previously

agreed by the Group of Ten. Industrialized and developing nations will

each select their representatives on these commissions approximately

preserving the eight-to-nineteen relationship within the group of

twenty-seven. General criteria reflecting degree of direct involvement

in the subject matters of each commission will be applied in this selec-

tion process with the understanding that the results must be generally

acceptable to the group of twenty-seven. Each commission will main-

tain a free exchange of information with the other commissions and

with other international fora as considered appropriate by each

commission.

Any of the three commissions may establish a sub-commission for

consideration of monetary and financial matters related to its subject

area.

4. The Group of Twenty-Seven will reconvene again at Ministerial



level after twelve months from the launching of the commissions to re-

ceive progress reports from all three commissions. This will be a

two-day meeting with the understanding that there will be no substan-

tive debate. At this meeting consideration will be given to possible fu-

ture action on the part of any or all of the commissions.

In addition, we are in agreement on the status of observers, with

both OPEC and IEA invited to sit behind a single plate labeled “ob-

servers” at the Group of Ten meeting with the understanding that no

observer will speak. There will be no observers at the meetings of the

Group of Twenty-Seven, but both OPEC and IEA will be invited to par-

ticipate in energy commission meetings with the right to speak.

You and I have worked together intimately with a mutual desire to

see a resumption of the dialogue for which you served as host at the ini-

tial Prepcon in Paris last April. In this spirit and with the same desire to

maintain the close cooperation between us, we would support your is-

suance of a letter to the members of the Group of Ten which contains

the terms of the plan outlined above on which we are now agreed, and

which makes clear that its acceptance by all participants is a condition

for issuance of invitations to a reconvened meeting. We share your con-

viction that there must be a commitment to this plan in advance to



365-608/428-S/80010

April 1975–October 1975 249

avoid confusion which could threaten the success of this meeting. Our

detailed bilateral discussions with key participants could be helpful in

guiding this approach to avoid unnecessary problems. I hope that you

and I will continue to maintain close and continuing contact as this im-

portant process evolves. Warmest regards. Henry A. Kissinger.”

Kissinger

72.

Memorandum From Robert Hormats and Robert Oakley of

the National Security Council Staff to the President’s Deputy

Assistant for National Security Affairs (Scowcroft)

1

Washington, July 25, 1975.



SUBJECT

Oil Price Increase

As you know, there is increasingly heated controversy within this

country over the price of oil and gas, and its consequences for the

economy. This pertains to the programs proposed by the President and

by Congress for domestic energy (decontrol, price levels, etc.) and to

the price of foreign oil. There is a strong body of criticism that in the for-

eign field the Administration has made no effort to keep OPEC oil

prices down, just as it is pushing prices up domestically.

In order to prepare for a possible OPEC price rise this fall (the in-

formal interagency consensus is that it will be about $1.50 per barrel),

the President needs to have a thorough analysis of the problem and the

options open to him in dealing with it. Next week CEA will table a pa-

per in the EPB on the economic effects of an OPEC oil price increase this

fall.

2

In fact this is only a third of the work which needs to be done in



preparing for this contingency. A second aspect is to identify those do-

mestic monetary and fiscal policy options available to offset the eco-

nomic impact of the increase. This task will almost certainly be given to

CEA and their collaborators on the economic effects paper.

1

Source: Ford Library, National Security Adviser, Presidential Files of NSC Logged



Documents, Box 24, 7505097—Oil Price Increase. Secret. Sent for action. At the top of the

page, Scowcroft wrote “OK” and initialed.

2

Not found.



365-608/428-S/80010

250 Foreign Relations, 1969–1976, Volume XXXVII

The third aspect of the problem—more basic and probably more

important—is to examine what we can do to discourage or minimize

the price increase. The President has stated that it would be “unaccept-

able,” but has not adduced any convincing arguments that it will not

occur. Treasury continues to make threatening noises on its own, but is

not thinking through what can actually be done. There have also been

threatening statements from Defense, although the President has pub-

licly ruled out the use of military force under present circumstances.

State publicly follows the Administration line of concern, but internally

seems rather indifferent.

In fact, there has been no systematic analysis of what possible ac-

tions might be taken to induce OPEC not to raise oil prices, the likely

effects of such actions, and the desirability of undertaking them. In the

absence of such a systematic study, there can be no firm guidance from

the President and Secretary Kissinger to the rest of the Executive

Branch on what to do and say about possible OPEC oil price increases.

Moreover, we are open to accusations by critics like Senators Church

and Stone

3

that there has been no systematic study of the problem and



that the Administration refuses to use its alleged “leverage” with the

oil producers (e.g., cutting off or restricting arms deliveries, stopping

the sale of food or manufactured products or raising their prices).

We intend to prepare a systematic study of available options for

dealing with a possible OPEC oil price increase.

4

This will form the



third part of the package which the President needs, complementing

the two being done by the CEA. Given the sensitivity of this question,

we will use the same quiet approach we have used successfully in pre-

paring Contingency Studies for a possible oil embargo.

5

(There has



been no publicity about or leak from this ad hoc NSC-chaired group

6

in



its six months of existence.) We will submit the draft study to you for

review before circulating it to other agencies or the EPB. We will tell the

EPB that the NSC will undertake such a study and will make it avail-

able to the EPB Executive Committee when it is completed.

3

Senators Frank Church (D–ID) and Richard Stone (D–FL).



4

See Document 93.

5

See Document 40.



6

No record of this group has been found.



365-608/428-S/80010

April 1975–October 1975 251



73.

Minutes of the Secretary of State’s Staff Meeting

1

Washington, July 25, 1975, 8–9:06 a.m.



[Omitted here is discussion unrelated to energy.]

Mr. Robinson: You know, we ran into a snag on the producer-

consumer conference with Yamani. I’ll go ahead with it.

Secretary Kissinger: Yes, but we are not sucking around him. For

anyone who doesn’t want a conference there’s not going to be a confer-

ence, and you’re not taking a trip out there; and the French are not

going to mediate this.

We’ve stated our position. We’ve spent a month negotiating it.

Anyone wanting to jump off now—they’ll have to hold a conference

without the United States.

Mr. Robinson: I’ll proceed on that basis.

Secretary Kissinger: In fact, I better call Sauvagnargues today.

Mr. Robinson: “You’re going to be in touch with us.” It might be

helpful.


Secretary Kissinger: Their position or our position? If they don’t

want to send out a letter of invitation, fine; we don’t need the

conference.

Mr. Robinson: Well, that’s the position I took. We don’t want a

conference on this basis. There’s been something that went on between

the Saudis and France in this negotiation this last week that is behind

this.

Secretary Kissinger: The French want to have something to me-



diate. (Laughter.)

Mr. Robinson: They’ve asked me to mediate this one.

Secretary Kissinger: What?

Mr. Robinson: They asked me to mediate this one. They asked me

to get it cleared up.

Secretary Kissinger: I just think it’s undignified to ask someone

from the United States to send someone out on such a technical point.

I’d be glad to write to Yamani if that adds to it.

1

Source: National Archives, RG 59, Transcripts of Secretary of State Kissinger’s



Staff Meetings, Lot 78D443, Box 3, Secretary’s Staff Meetings. Secret. Kissinger presided

over the meeting, which was attended by all the principal officers of the Department or

their designated alternates. A table of contents and list of attendees are not printed.


365-608/428-S/80010

252 Foreign Relations, 1969–1976, Volume XXXVII

Mr. Robinson: It might help. Why don’t I reword the cable

2

and



put it on that basis?

Secretary Kissinger: Why I clear cables in the evening if they don’t

go out anyway is not clear to me.

Mr. Adams: No. I gave it immediately to S/S.

Mr. Robinson: I want to clear the wording with NEA before it goes

out.


[Omitted here is discussion unrelated to energy.]

2

Robinson sent a message to Yamani that day, writing: “I have just learned from



Froment-Meurice of the French Government that you have indicated unwillingness to re-

sume the producer-consumer dialogue unless there is agreement to form a full commis-

sion dealing with monetary and financial affairs.” Robinson concluded: “We have con-

ceded to the wishes of the developing nations on other key matters and I now ask for

your cooperation on this one remaining issue.” (Telegram 175796 to Jidda, July 25; ibid.,

Central Foreign Policy Files, P850059–1688) On July 31, Akins reported that he had pre-

sented Robinson’s letter to Yamani, who continued to “insist on creation of a fourth com-

mittee on monetary and financial matters as precondition to reconvening of prepcon.”

(Telegram 5371 from Jidda; ibid., P850126–2379)


Download 8.4 Mb.

Do'stlaringiz bilan baham:
1   ...   23   24   25   26   27   28   29   30   ...   95




Ma'lumotlar bazasi mualliflik huquqi bilan himoyalangan ©fayllar.org 2020
ma'muriyatiga murojaat qiling