Foreign relations of the united states 1969–1976 volume XXXVII energy crisis, 1974–1980 department of state washington


Memorandum From Robert Hormats of the National Security


Download 8.4 Mb.
Pdf ko'rish
bet29/95
Sana17.02.2017
Hajmi8.4 Mb.
1   ...   25   26   27   28   29   30   31   32   ...   95

76.

Memorandum From Robert Hormats of the National Security

Council Staff to Secretary of State Kissinger

1

Washington, August 13, 1975.



SUBJECT

Steps to Prevent or Moderate an Oil Price Increase

There are indications that OPEC will increase oil prices as of Octo-

ber 1 by $1.50–$2 a barrel, but a final decision has not been made. There

are a limited number of possibilities for exercising a restraining influ-

ence, which are reviewed in this paper.

OPEC’s decision will probably depend on five factors:

—The economic strength of the importing countries. OPEC does

not want to cause, or to be perceived as causing, the incipient economic

recovery of the industrialized nations to abort. They recognize that

their economic fate is linked to the recovery. They also recognize that a

price increase in the face of stagnation in the industrialized world

would necessitate additional cutbacks in OPEC oil production, in turn

1

Source: Ford Library, National Security Adviser, Presidential Subject File, Box 4,



Energy (10). Secret. Sent for action. Brackets are in the original.

365-608/428-S/80010

April 1975–October 1975 263

pressuring the cartel into the politically difficult process of production

allocation which it has heretofore been able to avoid.

—The perceived possibility of a political and psychological reac-

tion in the developed countries which would provoke retaliation

through an arms embargo, aid cutoffs or even more severe action.

—Fears of individual members that failure to support action could

cause deterioration of bilateral relationships with other producers, pro-

voking attacks from radicals, undermining OPEC solidarity, and de-

priving producers with payments deficits of the opportunity to in-

crease revenues.

—The possibility of reaction from non-oil producing developing

countries, who are beginning to display recognition of the magnitude

of the problems which the last price increase has caused them. (OPEC

aid has offset less than one-third of recent increases in the LDC import

bill.)

—The impact which a price increase could have on the progress



which has been made toward a Middle East settlement, resumption of

the consumer-producer dialogue, and the new initiatives this involves.

If these are the major criteria in OPEC decision making, it be-

hooves the United States—through Presidential or Cabinet-level state-

ments, through the media, and/or by low-key but firm approaches

through diplomatic channels—to make the following points:

—A price increase will have a significant economic impact on the

industrial nations whether still in recession, as most are, or moving

toward recovery. [CEA estimates that the United States would lose

.7–.9 percent of its GNP growth as a direct result of a $1.50–$2 per barrel

price increase; after reflows through trade and investment, the figure

might drop to .5 percent. Unemployment—already very high—would

increase by .2–.3 percent. Tax cuts and monetary stimulus might even-

tually offset the GNP and unemployment losses, but at a significant

cost in terms of inflation. For Western Europe, which is still not in the

recovery stage, the GNP decline would probably be on the order of 2

percent; for Japan, more than 3 percent. Furthermore, in these countries

there is less room than in the US for reflationary fiscal and monetary ac-

tions to moderate this impact, and they will consequently be less able

than the US to offset the lower rate of growth.] A message of this sort,

articulated by competent economists in the US, Europe, and Japan,

might convince OPEC that the market was too weak to sustain large

price increases without significant oil production cutbacks.

—The direct impact on developing countries which do not pro-

duce oil, exacerbated by the lower level of consumption (and imports)

associated with a lower rate of growth in the developed world, would

be to further reduce growth, increase unemployment, and worsen pay-

ments deficits. On top of this would fall the higher prices of industrial-



365-608/428-S/80010

264 Foreign Relations, 1969–1976, Volume XXXVII

ized country exports associated with increased oil prices and a resur-

gence of inflation. The total balance of payments impact on the LDC’s

would be roughly $1.5 billion; for the MSA’s alone it could be $500 mil-

lion. The loss in GNP growth could be as much as 5 percent. This mes-

sage could be conveyed, in a low-key fashion, to Third World and

OPEC countries.

—The negative domestic reaction could make it difficult for the

United States (and other industrialized countries) to undertake the

measures we are planning to improve our economic relationships with

the developing world, and with the oil producers in particular. In view

of the fact that (according to Treasury) the purchasing power of a barrel

of oil as of December 1974 was roughly 4½ times what it was in 1955, in

spite of recent inflation caused in part by the last price increase, Amer-

icans will see no justification for a new increase. We might be forced by

Congressional/public pressure to reduce the level or slow down the

pace of our military and economic assistance as well as of activities

such as the Joint Commissions, which are designed to encourage closer

private sector relationships with the developing and oil producing

countries.

—Since the breakup of the consumer/producer preparatory con-

ference, the United States has made a major effort to re-establish a basis

for dialogue and cooperation with the developing world, including

particularly the oil exporters. We have undertaken a fundamental re-

view of our overall policy toward the developing countries, which has

produced the new approach articulated in your speeches in Kansas

City and Paris.

2

We will make additional proposals at the upcoming



Seventh Special Session of the UN. We have made great progress in es-

tablishing the conditions and understandings necessary to achieve mu-

tually beneficial cooperation. But this progress could be reversed by an

OPEC decision to increase the price of oil. Many in the US would raise

questions as to the wisdom of our more forthcoming attitude, arguing

for a far less positive or even hostile posture. This would seriously af-

fect bilateral relationships with key oil producers as well as the multi-

lateral dialogue.

It is essential to convey the above message promptly to key OPEC

and Third World countries, and to encourage other nations, particu-

larly other consumers, to do the same since the process of analysis lead-

ing up to the September 24 OPEC decision has already begun. Modera-

tion becomes increasingly difficult once the momentum for an increase

begins to build. The producers are aware in general of our views on a

price increase but making a firm approach after agreement is reached

2

See footnote 2, Document 62, and Document 64 and footnote 4 thereto.



365-608/428-S/80010

April 1975–October 1975 265

to resume the prepcon (along the lines of the attached message to King

Khalid which Bob Oakley and I drafted),

3

would heighten their aware-



ness. More general communications with other OPEC members and in-

fluential Third World countries might also have an impact.

To put it bluntly, it would be simply incredible for the President to

have to say after a price increase had taken place that he had not com-

municated with key OPEC leaders to make them aware of US opposi-

tion and the possible backlash effect in no uncertain terms, yet that is

the case at present. Moreover, as regards what you and the President

said at the 8:15 a.m. Saturday meeting on the economic problems in Eu-

rope, a substantial price increase will have an adverse psychological, as

well as economic, effect on the consuming countries, demonstrating

their helplessness in the face of the oil producers, even under IEA soli-

darity; it could also, of course, strengthen their efforts to reduce de-

pendence. It would certainly sour US public and Congressional atti-

tudes toward the producing countries, and this could make it more

difficult for us to defend and obtain approval of the economic initia-

tives to the Third World which you have developed. It would also

threaten legislation (e.g., foreign assistance) now pending before the

Congress, and could generate Congressional pressure for retaliatory

action against the producers (e.g., arms embargo, aid cutoff).

Recommendation:

That you call a meeting of your key advisers to determine a

strategy for addressing the potential oil price increase or instruct that a

scenario be developed along the above lines to be submitted to you for

approval by Friday, August 15.

Request meeting be set up

Ask Robinson, Enders, Hormats, Sisco, and Oakley to prepare a

scenario


4

3

Not attached. See footnote 6, Document 79, and Document 80 and footnote 2



thereto.

4

Kissinger approved this recommendation. No copy of the scenario has been



found.

365-608/428-S/80010

266 Foreign Relations, 1969–1976, Volume XXXVII



77.

Memorandum From the President’s Assistant for National

Security Affairs (Kissinger) to President Ford

1

Washington, August 15, 1975.



SUBJECT

Iran Bilateral Oil Deal

We have now reached agreement with Iran on the essential ele-

ments of the bilateral oil deal

2

(except for the interest moratorium pe-



riod as discussed below), but subject to USG acceptance for which we

will have to determine whether there is some existing authority.

The Shah has now indicated that if we are to proceed this must be

finalized by August 23 (8 days from now), to which is one month ahead

of the OPEC meeting of September 24 to consider the October 1 oil price

increase. The current status of our negotiations with further action re-

quired is discussed below:

1. The only major issue still unresolved is the question of the mora-

torium period; however, I believe that this can be compromised with

some flexibility on our part regarding the higher level of oil deliveries

which Iran desires during an initial period of the contract. We have

agreed to an additional 250,000 b/d (or a total of 750,000 b/d) during

an initial period from September 1, 1975 to February 29, 1976. This

would produce a cumulative average of 500,000 b/d (the contract level)

from an assumed starting date of June 1 which the Shah had requested.

Ansary advised me confidentially that the Shah would like to extend

this initial period of higher deliveries to December 31, 1976. Accord-

ingly, I suggest that we propose an interest moratorium of 120 days if

the initial period of increased deliveries terminates on February 29,

1976, or alternatively 150 days with the extension of this period to De-

cember 31, 1976.

2. With Congress out of session it is clear that our only hope is to

find some existing authority for this deal as we cannot obtain new au-

thority or an appropriation by August 23. From a limited and confiden-

tial review we had concluded that our only hope was through Treas-

ury’s right to issue notes combined with use of its Foreign Exchange

1

Source: Ford Library, National Security Adviser, Kissinger–Scowcroft West Wing



Office Files, Box 15, Iran (4). Secret; Nodis; Cherokee. Ford initialed at the top of the page.

2

For an earlier discussion of this issue, see Document 67. A copy of the draft oil



agreed to by Robinson and Ansary on June 30 was transmitted in telegram 6280 from

Tehran, July 1. (National Archives, RG 59, Central Foreign Policy Files, P840178–2008) As

U.S.-Iranian talks continued, Robinson sent further refinements of the agreement to the

Secretary in telegrams Tosec 80325/183102, August 3, and 20866 from Paris, August 13.

(Both ibid.)


365-608/428-S/80010

April 1975–October 1975 267

Stabilization Fund to cover any financial risk exposure and the Defense

Production Act to cover purchase and sale of oil. Accordingly, on Au-

gust 12 we developed with Iran’s Minister Ansary a set of procedures

which might be implemented on this basis as reflected in the memo-

randum—Elements of Agreement—at Tab A.

3

This document does not alter the basic terms which were con-



cluded with the Shah and Ansary in Tehran on June 30; however, it

does reflect a new implementing procedure which would be as follows:

a. The U.S. Treasury issues a note on the first of each month for the

value of the contracted oil deliveries for that month on receipt of bearer

contracts from the Government of Iran for immediate oil delivery.

b. The Treasury sells the bearer contracts to U.S. private companies

at auction prices or at cost to a U.S. stockpile or other USG programs.

c. Profits from (1) the difference between the contract price and the

auction price and (2) the interest moratorium, are credited to the For-

eign Exchange Stabilization Fund.

d. The Exchange Stabilization Fund covers any theoretical finan-

cial exposure, thereby avoiding congressional appropriation.

3. This is a highly technical matter which we have not yet dis-

cussed with Treasury lawyers; thus, we have no assurance that it will

prove to be a viable plan. There is a risk that further study will prove

our hopes to be unfounded; however, I believe that we should move

forward promptly with the following steps:

a. Confirm with Ansary that we will make every effort to conclude

this arrangement by the August 23 deadline but point out the possi-

bility that we may not be able to obtain required authority by that date.

At the same time we would propose the compromise on the interest

moratorium period as discussed above.

b. I will talk to Bill Simon and set the stage for an immediate inves-

tigation of the Treasury’s legal authority to make a commitment of this

type. It is critical that Treasury and State lawyers cooperate and try to

make the deal work, which is essential for success.

c. Assuming we are sufficiently encouraged regarding the possi-

bility of concluding this arrangement by the August 23 deadline, we

will send to Tehran by next Tuesday (August 19) State and Treasury

legal representatives for final drafting of the agreement.

d. Even if we determine that the USG has existing authority, we

should consult with certain key Members of Congress prior to commit-

ting to this Agreement.

3

Dated August 12; attached but not printed.



365-608/428-S/80010

268 Foreign Relations, 1969–1976, Volume XXXVII

e. If it appears likely that we will conclude this Agreement, we

must consult with key members of IEA to minimize the possibility of

an adverse reaction which might weaken the solidarity of this

organization.

Only by moving forward aggressively and in accordance with the

plan outlined above can we hold open the possibility of concluding this

arrangement.

4. Attached at Tab B

4

are the points which I would make in dis-



cussing the matter with Bill Simon.

5

Undoubtedly he will raise the fol-



lowing issues:

a. This deal appears to “bless” the current OPEC price level.

On the contrary:

—it represents a major crack in the solid OPEC front which could

lead to a break in OPEC prices reflecting market forces (in which case

we would cancel this Agreement).

—it partially protects us from the OPEC price increase on Oc-

tober 1.


b. It includes an element of “indexation” which might be viewed as accep-

tance of this principle.

Our argument is that we are obtaining oil in ex-

change for “Purchase Certificates” for U.S. products. To induce Iran to

make this kind of commitment we must provide them with assurance

of at least partial protection against declining value of the oil in terms of

U.S. product prices. The important point is that this only holds so long

as the formula price is less than the OPEC market price.

c. It could be viewed as a violation of the basic IEA understanding on bi-



lateral oil deals.

If properly explained I believe that IEA members would

see this as a move which could accelerate the return to a pricing system

based on market forces.



In summary,

this program would represent:

—a first major break in OPEC solidarity,

—a lower price on a portion of our oil imports,

—an effective response to the likely OPEC price increase on Octo-

ber 1,


—embargo insurance,

—a commitment assuring supply of oil to Israel as a replacement

for Abu Rudeis,

4

Not found.



5

At an August 16 meeting in Vail, Colorado, Kissinger told Ford: “On the Iranian

oil, Simon is violently opposed to it. He still expects a price break. No one else in the

world expects the price to drop. Jamieson [of Exxon] thinks the sellers’ market is re-

turning.” (Brackets in the original) Ford stated: “We are going to do it. Simon can like it or

not.” Kissinger replied: “We do need his cooperation.” (Memorandum of conversation;

Ford Library, National Security Adviser, Memoranda of Conversations, Box 14)


365-608/428-S/80010

April 1975–October 1975 269

—assured petrodollar recycling, supporting Treasury’s interest in

foreign exchange stabilization and the public’s interest in the sale of

U.S. goods and services.

On balance, it clearly serves U.S. interests and we should attempt

to conclude the necessary arrangements recognizing that we may be

frustrated in the end by lack of existing authority and the impossibility

of obtaining new authority by the August 23 deadline.

Recommendation:

That you approve proceeding along the above lines to finalize a bi-

lateral oil arrangement with Iran.

6

6



Ford approved the recommendation and wrote: “Would want Chuck Robinson to

work with Frank Zarb & Alan Greenspan as he has in past.” Zarb and Greenspan had

sent Ford a memorandum on August 7 in which they asserted: “We both believe that in

the light of an almost certain OPEC increase in October that this transaction can be con-

structive as embargo protection, as well as bringing pressures on the cartel.” (Ibid.,

Kissinger–Scowcroft West Wing Office Files, Box 15, Iran (4))



78.

Telegram From the Department of State to Selected

Diplomatic Posts

1

Washington, August 20, 1975, 0109Z.



196703. OECD Paris pass Lantzke; Brussels pass Davignon.

2

Subj:



French Consensus Proposal for Reconvening Prepcon.

1

Source: National Archives, RG 59, Central Foreign Policy Files, D750287–0508.



Confidential. Drafted and approved by Anne O. Cary (E). Sent to Brasilia, Kinshasa, New

Delhi, Tokyo, Jidda, Oslo, Tehran, Caracas, Bonn, London, Copenhagen, Stockholm,

Dublin, The Hague, Luxembourg, Rome, Madrid, Ankara, Bern, Vienna, Ottawa, and

Wellington, and repeated to USOECD Paris and USEC Brussels.

2

Davignon responded by urging that the United States “not formally answer the



French aide-me´moire until after the meeting of the IEA Governing Board” on August 25.

He said that he thought IEA members could “be persuaded to support the U.S. position if

they are given an opportunity to discuss it and if they are not presented with a fait accom-

pli.” (Telegram 7407 from Brussels, August 20; ibid., P850081–2027) Enders phoned Da-

vignon and told him that the U.S. response to the aide-me´moire “did not constitute for-

mal USG acceptance of the French consensus proposal” but, rather, indicated U.S.

agreement that the “scenario proposed was an acceptable basis for resuming the dia-

logue.” Enders added that the United States did not intend to accept the consensus pro-

posal formally until four points were “clarified to [U.S.] satisfaction,” as well as “those

which may be raised by the other nine invitees.” (Telegram 198251 to Brussels, August 20;

ibid., P850047–2489)


365-608/428-S/80010

270 Foreign Relations, 1969–1976, Volume XXXVII

1. Following aide-me´moire delivered by French Charge´ August 18;

same text handed each of 10 Prepcon participants.

3

We understand in-



vitations to Prepcon will be issued only when 10 have indicated to

French this paper acceptable basis for meeting.

4

US response follows



septel.

5

2. “It is understood that the questions to be considered in the dia-



logue between industrialized countries and developing countries are

energy, raw materials, and development problems, including all re-

lated financial questions.

3. These questions will be considered on an equal footing. Partici-

pants in the dialogue will, in particular, make every effort to advance

toward constructive solutions in each of these areas.

4. A new preparatory meeting will be held in Paris at the earliest

possible date, and no later than October 15, with the same participants,

at the same level, and under the same rules of procedure (in particular,

with respect to observers) as the preparatory meeting of last April.

5. The title of this meeting will be: ‘Preparatory Meeting for the

Conference Between Industrialized Countries and Developing

Countries.’

6. The preparatory meeting will have the task of:

—Confirming the consensus reached at the April preparatory

meeting on the convening of a limited but representative conference,

the number of its participants, and the manner in which they shall be

selected;

—Submitting to the conference between industrialized countries

and developing countries proposals relating to the creation of commis-

sions and their composition (members and observers).

3

The United States, the European Community, Japan, Saudi Arabia, Iran, Algeria,



Venezuela, Brazil, India, and Zaire.

4

Sauvagnargues announced on September 15 at the EC Council of Ministers meet-



ing in Brussels that the Government of France had issued invitations to Prepcon II, which

would begin on October 13. (Telegram 23764 from Paris, September 16; National Ar-

chives, RG 59, Central Foreign Policy Files, D750320–0426)

5

The Department replied in telegram 197496 to Paris, August 20: “The Government



of the United States is pleased to accept the points made in the August 18 aide-me´moire

of the Government of France as the basis upon which it would accept an invitation to

renew the dialogue between consumers and producers.” It then clarified the points upon

which it wanted the U.S. position “to be unambiguous,” including points 2–1, 4–1, 4–9,

and 5–2. (Ford Library, National Security Adviser, Presidential Country Files for Europe

and Canada, Box 4, France—State Department Telegrams from SECSTATE–NODIS (3))

On September 9, Kissinger wrote Sauvagnargues: “I am pleased to learn that discussions

between our respective representatives have resolved remaining differences with regard

to the consensus proposal circulated in your aide-me´moire of August 18.” (Telegram

213668 to Paris; National Archives, RG 59, Central Foreign Policy Files, P850033–1986)



365-608/428-S/80010

April 1975–October 1975 271

7. Preliminary work for the preparatory meeting should be done in

such a way that consensus may be reached within no more than two to

three days.

8. The preparatory meeting will be followed, within a period not to

exceed two months, by the conference between industrialized countries

and developing countries, composed of 27 members, 8 and 19 for each

of the two groups respectively. Each group will choose its repre-

sentatives to the conference within no more than a month after the pre-

paratory meeting.

9. The Conference Between Industrialized Countries and Devel-

oping Countries will open at the Ministerial level. Like the preparatory

meeting, it should last no more than two to three days.

10. The primary task of the conference will be to reach decisions on

the proposals which shall be submitted by the preparatory meeting for

approval.

11. This should lead to the creation of four commissions corre-

sponding to the themes of the dialogue, determination of how they

should be composed, and agreement on how to follow up the work of

the commissions.

12. It would be advisable for these commissions to have no more

than fifteen members. In setting up the membership of each commis-

sion, each of the two groups making up the conference will choose

among its own members those who, by virtue of their particular in-

terests as well as the general significance to be attached to their partici-

pation, seem best suited to be included, so that the proceedings may

take place in an efficient and responsible manner. Each of the commis-

sions will be presided over by two co-chairmen, designated respec-

tively by each of the two groups.

13. The commissions will be made up of high-level experts.

14. The commission on energy will have the task, within the frame-

work of a general survey of world prospects for production and con-

sumption of energy, including hydrocarbons, of facilitating, by appro-

priate ways and means, arrangements which seem desirable between

oil producers and consumers.

15. The commission on raw materials will have the task of facili-

tating, by appropriate ways and means, in the light of the existing situ-

ation, arrangements which seem desirable in the area of raw materials,

including food commodities which are of particular interest to devel-

oping countries.

16. The commission on development will have the task of facili-

tating, by appropriate ways and means in the light of the existing situa-

tion, arrangements which seem desirable in the area of cooperation for

development.


365-608/428-S/80010

272 Foreign Relations, 1969–1976, Volume XXXVII

17. The commission for financial matters, while respecting areas of

competence of the international institutions (IMF, World Bank), will

study all financial problems related to the work of the three preceding

commissions. It will be made up of a limited number of members from

each of these three commissions.

18. The commissions on raw materials and development will, in

particular, consider the work being done in other appropriate interna-

tional forums and will establish the necessary liaison with them.

19. Joint meetings of commission co-chairmen may be provided for

as required.

20. Observers from organizations directly concerned with the

problems under consideration may sit with the commissions and have

the right to speak.

21. The conference will meet again at the Ministerial level within

about twelve months.

22. A meeting or meetings of the conference at the government of-

ficial level could perhaps be held at least six months after the first

meeting of the conference at the Ministerial level.

23. It would be desirable to reach a consensus on these various

points within a fairly short time so that the convening of a new prepara-

tory meeting may be announced as quickly as possible.”

6


Download 8.4 Mb.

Do'stlaringiz bilan baham:
1   ...   25   26   27   28   29   30   31   32   ...   95




Ma'lumotlar bazasi mualliflik huquqi bilan himoyalangan ©fayllar.org 2020
ma'muriyatiga murojaat qiling