Foreign relations of the united states 1969–1976 volume XXXVII energy crisis, 1974–1980 department of state washington


Download 8.4 Mb.
Pdf ko'rish
bet30/95
Sana17.02.2017
Hajmi8.4 Mb.
1   ...   26   27   28   29   30   31   32   33   ...   95

Kissinger

6

After its informal August 25 meeting to address the French aide-me´moire, the IEA



Governing Board issued a “Secretariat note” that explained that the “delegations agreed

as to the importance of resuming the dialogue promptly, and were generally of the view

that the procedures outlined in the aide-me´moire for resuming the dialogue formed a ba-

sis on which participating countries of the Agency could accept invitations to participate

in a new preparatory meeting,” subject to a list of items it wanted clarified. (Telegram

22249 from USOECD Paris, August 29; ibid., D750300–0060)



365-608/428-S/80010

April 1975–October 1975 273



79.

Telegram From the Embassy in Saudi Arabia to the

Department of State

1

Jidda, August 28, 1975, 1330Z.



6009. Subject: Oil Policy.

Summary: According to Oil Minister Yamani, the Saudis had de-

cided to hold the line for zero price increases in the September OPEC

meeting. They had even gone so far as to point out to Iranian Oil Minis-

ter Amouzegar that the Saudis might even risk destruction of OPEC to

prevent a price increase. In view of what the Saudis consider our “new

hard line” toward them to be however, price policy is now undergoing

review, and Yamani is not rpt not sure what position the Saudis will

take. Although the Ambassador stressed to Yamani that arguments

he had previously made about price increases had not changed, and

said he knew of no “signals” of changed U.S. policy toward the

Saudis, the outcome of the Saudis’ current policy review is in doubt.

Any letter from President Ford or other U.S. leaders to King Khalid,

Prince Fahd or Yamani should call attention to the Saudis’ public

statements on oil policy and express hope that Saudis will be able to

hold that line at the OPEC meeting. A tough letter on oil prices

would almost certainly be counterproductive; it might tend to

confirm their fears that U.S. policy toward Saudi Arabia had shifted.

End summary.

1. Saudi Oil Minister Yamani told me Aug 27 that my approaches

to him from April through July on oil prices had been discussed at

length in the Saudi Cabinet and had finally been accepted. The Cabinet

had agreed that at the OPEC meeting the end of September Saudi Ara-

bia must hold the line against any price increase.

2. Prince Fahd discussed the matter with the Shah when he was

there recently and with Amouzegar when the latter recently came to

Saudi Arabia.

2

The Iranian position was that prices should rpt should



be increased by the full 35 percent increase in cost of imports, namely

$3.50. Iran, however, would be willing to “compromise” on a price

increase of “only” $2.00 or $2.50. Yamani said Fahd, unfortunately,

1

Source: National Archives, RG 59, Central Foreign Policy Files, D750299–0620.



Confidential; Immediate; Exdis. Repeated to Abu Dhabi, Algiers, Bern, Bonn, Brussels for

the Embassy, USEC, and USNATO, Cairo, Caracas, Copenhagen, Doha, The Hague,

Jakarta, Kuwait, Lagos, Libreville, London, Rome, Paris for the Embassy and USOECD,

Tehran, Tokyo, Tripoli, Vienna, Brasilia, Kinshasa, New Delhi, and Quito.

2

Fahd was in Iran July 1–3, and Amouzegar visited Saudi Arabia during the first



week of August.

365-608/428-S/80010

274 Foreign Relations, 1969–1976, Volume XXXVII

had been rather weak in dealing with the Shah; Fahd had urged him

to reconsider his position and to adopt a lower price, but he made

no threats and he gave no indication of independent Saudi action

if Iran refused to move. When Amouzegar was here, however, the

Saudi position was much stronger. Amouzegar was told, Yamani

said, that if Iran insisted on a high price increase Saudi Arabia

would sell at the lower price and increase its production markedly

even if this risks a split in OPEC. Yamani will be going to Tehran

this afternoon (Aug 28) or tomorrow to discuss the matter with the

Iranians.

3. Yamani said it was absolutely crucial that the United States un-

derstand this Saudi action was a result of the approaches I had made,

and especially that the decision had been taken long before the “new

hard American line” toward Saudi Arabia. We should not deceive our-

selves into thinking they had yielded to pressure. There was ample evi-

dence of this if we are willing to see it. He had made a statement to the

Cairo press three weeks ago, which we surely had noted, on the neces-

sity of keeping oil prices frozen and Prince Fahd, when in Paris,

had said that oil prices had risen far enough. (Note: There had been

several SRF reports on the same line.) Yamani was also quoted in



Ukaz

on Aug 12 as saying the Kingdom saw no justified economic

reason for raising petroleum prices, and the interview published in Al

Musawwar

Aug 21 repeated this statement almost word for word.

4. Yamani said the situation had now changed. Assistant Secretary

Enders in London at the opening of the Prepcon launched U.S. policy to

“break OPEC.”

3

The Saudis chose to ignore this but our new policy,



Yamani said, had clearly been formalized in my dismissal

4

and the



adoption of a “new hard line” toward Saudi Arabia. Yamani said he

was not rpt not now sure what position Saudi Arabia would take on oil

prices.

5. I told the Minister that this matter was infinitely more important



than the person of the Ambassador, that I had no idea what “signals” if

any we were trying to send to the Saudis. Yamani said he had long sus-

pected that some in the U.S. administration really wanted oil prices to

go up. A number of the Saudis’ friends in the OECD and the oil indus-

try have told him that Assistant Secretary Enders has said that the U.S.

favored higher oil prices now as a means of uniting the consumers in

economic or even military war against producers. Yamani knew that I

had taken quite another position, that I had constantly fought, cajoled,

3

Not further identified. Prepcon I was held in Paris not London.



4

See footnote 4, Document 52.



365-608/428-S/80010

April 1975–October 1975 275

persuaded the Saudis to keep the lid on oil prices and I had been suc-

cessful in persuading them to do so. He also had no doubt that this was

the policy favored by the Secretary and Treasury and very likely by the

President of the United States, but others, he said, seem to be playing

another game.

6. I told him that I did not know if anyone were playing a game

at all. My instructions had been clear, but even if there were any

taking such a devious position the Saudis should not rpt not play

into their hands and agree to increased oil prices. Yamani said he

understood this point but we should also understand that many of

the Saudi Cabinet now felt that with the “new hard line” toward

Saudi Arabia, the Saudi policy on oil prices must undergo a complete

review.

7. Comment: Under the circumstances, I strongly urge that any



letter sent by President Ford to King Khalid or any letter from any U.S.

leader to the King, the Crown Prince or the Petroleum Minister prior to

the OPEC meeting call attention to the statements made by Prince Fahd

in Paris


5

and by Yamani in Cairo; that the letter express the hope that

Saudi Arabia will be able to hold its publicly proclaimed line on prices

in the OPEC meeting. An expression of appreciation for the earlier ac-

tions of Saudi Arabia in restraining oil prices would also be well re-

ceived here. In no circumstances should Saudi Arabia be lumped to-

gether with those countries which have publicly demanded higher oil

prices.


8. The Saudis are already disturbed at what they have interpreted

as a change of American policy and they are beginning to worry

again about the invasion threat. If we send them a tough letter

on oil prices—particularly given the fact that they had accepted

the arguments I had earlier made and confirmed this by public

statements—they will conclude that we are attempting to provoke

them.

9. There can be no guarantee that the Saudis will not rpt not yield



to OPEC pressures, particularly in face of what they interpret as

an American challenge, but there seems no doubt that there is

(or has been) a desire to hold the line on prices, with no increase or

at most an increase of 50 cents per barrel. A word of appreciation

and encouragement here would be much more effective than

5

On July 22, Fahd told Giscard that if the industrialized countries stabilized cur-



rency rates, the oil producers did not plan to raise prices later in the year. (The New York

Times

, July 23, 1975, p. 6)



365-608/428-S/80010

276 Foreign Relations, 1969–1976, Volume XXXVII

any threat or hard line we could and should take with other OPEC

leaders.


6

Akins

6

Referring to this telegram and others, Sober sent a personal message to Atherton



in which he wrote: “I believe we must assume that the SAG is genuinely concerned that

we may be beginning a process of turning away from them.” Sober added that the De-

partment “should not ignore the possibility that the SAG actually intends to fight for

keeping the present line on prices.” “Most importantly,” he wrote, “I believe we need to

get to the Saudis as quickly as possible and in a way that can best stem their current incli-

nation to read strong negative political signals into our forthcoming change of Ambassa-

dors.” Sober recommended a visit to Saudi Arabia by Kissinger, so that the Royal family

could “hear the word directly” concerning U.S. intentions. Finally, Sober suggested mo-

difying a previously proposed letter from President Ford to King Khalid on oil prices

based on Akins’s advice, “if we are to believe Yamani.” (Telegram Tosec 100281/205854

to USDel Secretary, August 28; National Archives, RG 59, Central Foreign Policy Files,

P850036–2606)



80.

Telegram From the Department of State to the Embassy in

Iran

1

Washington, September 9, 1975, 2107Z.



214124. Subject: OPEC Oil Price Decision.

1. You are requested to deliver the following letter from President

Ford to the Shah as soon as possible.

2

“Your Imperial Majesty: I wish to present for your consideration



my thoughts on an issue of great importance to relations between de-

veloped and developing countries, and to the economic well-being of

our two countries and all the nations of the world.

Since the consumer/producer preparatory meeting in Paris last

April, the United States has made a major effort to re-establish a basis

for dialogue and cooperation between the nations of the developing

world, including those which export oil, and the industrialized nations.

We have undertaken a fundamental review of our overall policy

1

Source: National Archives, RG 59, Central Foreign Policy Files, D750312–0062.



Confidential; Immediate; Exdis. Drafted by Marion V. Creekmore (EB/ORF/FSE);

cleared by Enders, Sober, and Sorenson; and approved by Kissinger.

2

Ford sent similar letters to Khalid in telegram 214123 to Jidda, September 10, and



to Pe´rez in telegram 214126 to Caracas, September 9. (Both ibid., D750313–0835 and

D750312–0063)



365-608/428-S/80010

April 1975–October 1975 277

toward the developing countries. This review has resulted in a new ap-

proach to the producer/consumer dialogue that responds more fully to

these nations’ concerns, particularly those raised by your government’s

representatives and other delegations during the Paris meeting. Since

Secretary Kissinger articulated the general outlines of this approach in

speeches in Kansas City and Paris in May, we have made much

progress in establishing the constructive understandings necessary to

promote further mutually beneficial cooperation not only between our

two nations but among the broader world community. Furthermore, as

you know, we have made a number of important specific proposals for

cooperation at the current Special Session of the United Nations Gen-

eral Assembly.

3

The economic dialogue will be a centerpiece in the new evolving



relationship between the industrial and developing nations. We are

pleased that our efforts, and those of your government and others, have

succeeded in establishing a consensus for resuming these discussions.

Over the past months, we have clearly demonstrated our commitment

to a constructive dialogue and our belief that its success requires each

participant to recognize and take full account of the vital interests of the

others.

As you can appreciate, the support of the American public for the



new US position must be based on an awareness of the concerns of the

oil producers and other developing countries and the need to seek co-

operative solutions to our common economic problems. I am con-

cerned, however, that this necessary support will be jeopardized

should the member countries of OPEC increase the price of oil this fall.

I am also concerned that such action could raise serious questions

among the American public regarding the close cooperation we seek

and are actively developing with your country in several fields of our

bilateral relationship. I value this relationship greatly and sincerely

wish to continue to broaden and deepen it.

Another oil price increase by OPEC would also have a significant

negative impact on the economies of all the oil importing nations—

3

A key paragraph of Kissinger’s address before the Seventh Special Session of the



UN General Assembly on September 1 (as read by Moynihan) reads: “These economic is-

sues have already become the subject of mounting confrontation—embargoes, cartels,

seizures, countermeasures—and bitter rhetoric. Over the remainder of this century,

should this trend continue, the division of the planet between North and South, between

rich and poor, could become as grim as the darkest days of the cold war. We would enter

an age of festering resentment, increased resort to economic warfare, a hardening of new

blocs, the undermining of cooperation, the erosion of international institutions—and

failed development . . . Can we reconcile our competing goals? Can we build a better

world, by conscious purpose, out of the equality and cooperation of states?” The speech

is printed in Department of State Bulletin, September 22, 1975, pp. 425–441. Excerpts were

published in The New York Times, September 2, 1975, p. 20.


365-608/428-S/80010

278 Foreign Relations, 1969–1976, Volume XXXVII

both developed and developing—at the very time that signs of prog-

ress in the fight against recession and inflation are appearing. Such a

price increase would impose shocks on the U.S. economy, on the more

vulnerable economies of Europe and Japan, and finally on the highly

fragile economies of the developing world. It would at the very least re-

duce the progress toward economic recovery and could, in fact, plunge

a number of countries into extremely serious difficulties.

It is because I am aware, Your Majesty, of your sensitivity to the in-

terdependence of the world economy and your commitment to a suc-

cessful economic dialogue that I am asking you to weigh heavily the

adverse effects—both psychological and real—which a price increase

could have. It is my hope that you will use your considerable influence

among the producing countries to urge restraint on oil prices and to

argue that our long-term mutual interest in a more rational global eco-

nomic structure should prevail over short-term economic advantage.

Sincerely, Gerald R. Ford. His Imperial Majesty Mohammad Reza

Pahlavi, Shahanshah of Iran, Tehran.”

2. Report when delivery effected.

4

Kissinger

4

In his response, the Shah listed reasons why he believed an oil price increase



would be justified and noted that “the tax imposed by the consuming industrialized na-

tions on oil products which on average nearly equals the government take of the oil pro-

ducing nations can very well be adjusted to take care of any increase in oil prices.” (Tele-

gram 8946 from Tehran, September 11; National Archives, RG 59, Central Foreign Policy

Files, D750314–0640) Khalid replied on September 23 that Saudi Arabia was “making an

effort to curb the pressures for a further increase in the price of oil,” but that it did not

want “to maintain a position singlehandedly if all of the other OPEC states insist upon an

increase in prices.” (Telegram 6525 from Jidda, September 23; ibid., D750330–0344) Pe´rez,

in a September 23 letter to Ford, argued that an oil price rise would be justified because

“inflation generated in the industrialized countries” was “constantly eating away at the

purchasing power of our revenues.” (Ford Library, National Security Adviser, Presiden-

tial Correspondence with Foreign Leaders, Box 5, Venezuela—President Carlos A. Perez)



365-608/428-S/80010

April 1975–October 1975 279



81.

Memorandum of Conversation

1

Taif, Saudi Arabia, September 11, 1975.



PARTICIPANTS

Zaki Yamani, Minister of Petroleum and Natural Resources

Henry A. Kissinger, Secretary of State

James E. Akins, U.S. Ambassador to Saudi Arabia

Joseph Sisco, Under Secretary of State for Political Affairs

Robert Hormats, Senior Staff Member, National Security Council (Notetaker)

SUBJECT

Oil Price Increase and the Producer-Consumer Dialogue



Secretary Kissinger: I am extremely pleased to see you again.

Minister Yamani: It is my pleasure, and I am glad you could visit

Saudi Arabia.

Secretary Kissinger: I have read of some conversations in which

you indicated that you believed that the US was embarking on a policy

of getting tough with Saudi Arabia. I just wanted to tell you personally

that this is not our policy. If you believe everything that Joe Kraft

2

writes, you will be in very bad shape.



Minister Yamani: Well, we have heard of this and are concerned.

Secretary Kissinger: Let me assure you that you have nothing to be

concerned about. There is absolutely no truth to this. It is certainly not

our policy.

I would like to discuss two other issues briefly: an oil price increase

and the consumer/producer dialogue.

On the issue of an oil price increase, I won’t go into the economic

issues. You know these far better than I do. I am no expert. But I will

comment on the political side. A price increase will be used by our op-

ponents in the US—by those opponents of our policy toward the Arab

World. They’ll say we are not tough enough with the Arabs knowing

full well that if we get tougher the Arabs will retaliate. This would

worsen the climate between the US and the Arab World and will be

very harmful to our efforts to improve relations with the Arabs and to

our efforts in the Middle East. The cost will outweigh any conceivable

economic benefit.

Minister Yamani: Sometimes we are confused. When His Highness

Prince Fahd was in Tehran, the Shah told us that your view was that it

was necessary to have a price increase.

1

Source: National Archives, RG 59, Central Foreign Policy Files, P820123–1520. Se-



cret; Nodis. The meeting took place in the King’s compound.

2

Syndicated newspaper columnist Joseph Kraft.



365-608/428-S/80010

280 Foreign Relations, 1969–1976, Volume XXXVII

Secretary Kissinger: It is not conceivable that that could be por-

trayed as my view.

Minister Yamani: Well, the US view. They said that it was your

view that an increase was needed to help you increase your independ-

ence. But our view is that we do not want an increase. In fact, we have

sent a message to the Shah from the King against a price increase. The

Shah wants a large increase of perhaps 20%, more than $2 per barrel.

He thinks that OPEC might compromise at about 15%, and he would

go along with this. The Shah is the one who wants an increase. We in

Saudi Arabia do not and have said so. But you must convince the Shah.

Secretary Kissinger: If the price of oil goes up it will lead to mas-

sive political problems for our efforts in the Middle East. It would also

have enormous economic consequences which you know.

Minister Yamani: We know your views. We are not in the forefront

of those who want a price increase. That is not our traditional position.

But your views should be told to other OPEC countries who feel

differently.

Secretary Kissinger: When I return, the President will send a mes-

sage to the Shah so he can be under no misconception about our atti-

tude on this.

Minister Yamani: We will, of course, be talking to other OPEC

countries as well. But you must understand that we really do not know

what to make of what we read about the US tough line. This obviously

has influence on our position.

Secretary Kissinger: I can assure you there is no tough line. It is

pure newspaper idle speculation. There is no truth to it. I give you my

personal assurance.

With respect to the consumer/producer conference, it is coming

out along the lines you and I discussed. You must accept total victory.

Minister Yamani: What?

Secretary Kissinger: Yes, total victory. This is very much, almost

exactly, what you wanted.

Minister Yamani: We have worked hard on this.

Secretary Kissinger: You played a very constructive role. When I

think back, we are very close to what you and I discussed.

3

Minister Yamani: There seem to be some issues not yet agreed.



Secretary Kissinger: Do you think that Saudi Arabia and the US

can discuss how we can proceed in these meetings. We need to coordi-

nate closely in our mutual interest.

Minister Yamani: Yes, but we have many differences, too.

3

See Document 55.



365-608/428-S/80010

April 1975–October 1975 281

Secretary Kissinger: Yes, but we have many areas of agreement.

These outweigh any differences. And I am not aware of major

differences.

Minister Yamani: Well, I think we can work closely.

Secretary Kissinger: Chuck Robinson will be in touch with you. He

is working closely on this. Of course, you are always welcome to be in

touch with me.

Minister Yamani: I might be in Washington in the first half of Sep-

tember, but only for four or five days.

Secretary Kissinger: Let me know when you will be there. Maybe

we can have lunch or tea or something. I would very much welcome

visiting with you again.

Minister Yamani: It is very nice to see you here in Taif, and I look

forward to seeing you again in Washington.

Secretary Kissinger: It is important that we work closely together,

and I will welcome your visit.



Download 8.4 Mb.

Do'stlaringiz bilan baham:
1   ...   26   27   28   29   30   31   32   33   ...   95




Ma'lumotlar bazasi mualliflik huquqi bilan himoyalangan ©fayllar.org 2020
ma'muriyatiga murojaat qiling