Foreign relations of the united states 1969–1976 volume XXXVII energy crisis, 1974–1980 department of state washington


 Briefing Memorandum From the Acting Assistant Secretary


Download 8.4 Mb.
Pdf ko'rish
bet37/95
Sana17.02.2017
Hajmi8.4 Mb.
1   ...   33   34   35   36   37   38   39   40   ...   95

100. Briefing Memorandum From the Acting Assistant Secretary

of State for Economic and Business Affairs (Katz) to

Secretary of State Kissinger

1

Washington, July 16, 1976.



Assessment of the International Energy Agency

The IEA has been in existence for slightly more than a year and a

half. Its record to date is one of considerable achievement, tempered

however, by a number of shortcomings. In political terms the agency

has been an unqualified success in forging a cooperative consumer ap-

proach under US leadership and in formulating an integrated strategy

on energy which responds to the challenge posed by the Third World.

The key elements of the International Energy Program (IEP) are now in

place—an emergency mechanism to ensure a collective response to fu-

ture embargoes; a long-term cooperative program which provides the

tools which will enable us over time to shift the supply/demand condi-

tions in the world oil market and thus lessen OPEC’s unilateral pricing

power; and an oil market information system. The agency has been sig-

nally useful as a forum for coordinating industrialized country posi-

tions for the dialogue on energy in CIEC.

There have, however, been some disappointments—particularly

our inability to move ahead rapidly on certain portions of the coopera-

tive programs which have been agreed upon. This is especially true in

the field of conservation where we have failed to apply our resources

adequately. The US record is even worse than that of Europe and Japan.

We account for some 50% of the IEA’s oil consumption and have the

greatest potential among the IEA countries for implementing meaning-

ful measures. Our IEA partners expect us to take the initiative on con-

servation, and to date we have not met the challenge. We have failed to

approach energy conservation in the IEA with the degree of commit-

ment that has been directed toward energy supply expansion.



Long-Term Program

Negotiation of the January 1976 long-term program to reduce our

joint dependence on imported oil constitutes one of the agency’s major

achievements. The program provides for coordination of national ef-

forts and cooperative measures in conservation, the accelerated pro-

duction of new energy, and R&D. It provides us with the framework

necessary to achieve our common objective of reduced dependence and

1

Source: National Archives, RG 59, Central Foreign Policy Files, P760114–1151.



Confidential. Drafted by D.S. Wilson (EB/ORF/FSE) and cleared by Raicht.

365-608/428-S/80010

358 Foreign Relations, 1969–1976, Volume XXXVII

vulnerability. Several elements of the program such as national re-

views, sectoral studies and R&D cooperation are well underway. Oth-

ers such as project cooperation, the MSP and the setting of medium and

long-term import dependency goals are in the process of being elabo-

rated. The US has identified three priority areas for possible joint

project cooperation—coal, synthetic fuels, and enriched uranium serv-

ices. IEA work programs are already underway in the nuclear and coal

sectors which, together with conservation, constitute the most viable al-

ternatives to oil over the next decade.

As concrete and visible evidence of our commitment to reduced oil

imports we are pressing for the establishment of national reduced de-

pendence targets by IEA countries over the next 6–9 months.

2

We have


called for an IEA Ministerial meeting which would endorse these tar-

gets and ensure that member countries make the political commitment

to implement the more vigorous policy necessary to achieve them.

Such a commitment could assist the Administration in persuading a re-

luctant Congress to adopt a strong and effective US domestic energy

policy.


Coordination for Energy Commission

Another of the agency’s notable successes has been the key role it

plays in the coordination of industrial country strategy and tactics in

the Energy Commission of the CIEC. Common industrial country posi-

tions are formulated and endorsed by the IEA Governing Board. The

IEA mechanism has proved extremely useful in thrashing out specific

issues such as the question of an ongoing post-CIEC dialogue with pro-

ducers and how to present our International Energy Institute (IEI) pro-

posal to the Energy Commission. Through the IEA we have succeeded

in moderating the European push toward a comprehensive post-CIEC

consultation on oil prices and in alleviating concerns over the expected

scope and mandate of the IEI. The IEA mechanism has greatly facili-

tated our effort to ensure that the industrial countries speak in the en-

ergy dialogue with one voice.



Emergency Program

In order to reduce our short-term vulnerability to supply interrup-

tions the agency established as a matter of priority an emergency oil

sharing scheme. That program is now in place and operational. A test

of the oil allocation mechanism will be conducted this fall to verify its

2

The United States introduced this proposal in the March 16 IEA Governing Board



meeting as part of its plan to implement the Long-Term Cooperation Program. (Telegram

62056 to USOECD Paris, March 13; ibid., Central Foreign Policy Files, D760096–0217)

Kissinger reiterated the proposal in his opening statement to the OECD Ministerial

meeting on June 21. For the text, see Department of State Bulletin, July 19, 1976, pp. 73–83.



365-608/428-S/80010

October 1975–January 1977 359

effectiveness. The program provides important psychological protec-

tion and evidence indicates that it would considerably reduce the fu-

ture impact of a 1973-type embargo. It would also reduce the tendency

for individual IEA countries to compete for available oil, thus bidding

up prices to a higher level than would otherwise prevail, as occurred

during the 1973 embargo.



Future of the IEA

To date the IEA has been highly successful in projecting the excep-

tional image of an action-oriented organization. Now that its key pro-

grams are in place, we will have to work to sustain the momentum

which has propelled the agency up to the present. As has been the case

for other international bodies there is a danger that interest will wane

and levels of offical representation at meetings will drop. Your pro-

posal for establishing joint reduced dependency objectives backed by

concrete programs and a Ministerial-level meeting to endorse them

should serve to maintain the impetus over the months ahead.



US Energy Policy and the IEA

By virtue of the dominant position of the US in the IEA, our own

domestic energy program has a significant bearing upon the effective-

ness of the agency. As is true for the IEA, our domestic program has

been a mixture of achievements and shortcomings. The impasse over

domestic energy policy which prevailed throughout most of 1975 seri-

ously hindered our efforts to extract strong commitments from other

IEA member countries. The Energy Policy and Conservation Act

(EPCA) signed by the President in December 1975 constitutes a step in

the right direction—albeit insufficient. On the positive side it provides

for major conservation efforts and authorizes the creation of a strategic

storage program to lessen the adverse economic consequences of new

embargoes. But it falls short of what is required if we are to make mean-

ingful headway in achieving our energy independence objectives. The

bill does not immediately decontrol oil and natural gas prices which is

viewed by most IEA countries as a matter of the highest priority for the

US; neither does it contain financial incentives for the accelerated de-

velopment of energy supplies. The Administration is pressing for addi-

tional legislation—e.g., to deregulate interstate natural gas prices, to es-

tablish an Energy Independence Authority, to provide authority for US

participation in the OECD Financial Support Fund—but both the up-

coming election and Congressional skepticism about the reality of the

energy crisis make uncertain the prospects for these efforts.

Our IEA partners understandably expect us to take the initiative

on conservation and new supplies. Perception of doubt or hesitation on

our part will complicate and can ultimately compromise our efforts to

bring forth the major commitment of the national resources which will


365-608/428-S/80010

360 Foreign Relations, 1969–1976, Volume XXXVII

be required to achieve our IEA objectives. Hence there exists a direct re-

lationship between convincing and effective US domestic energy poli-

cies and credible IEA programs.

101. Memorandum by Robert Hormats of the National Security

Council Staff

1

Washington, July 19, 1976.



MEMORANDUM FOR

The Secretary of Commerce

The Deputy Secretary of State

The Deputy Secretary of Defense

The Administrator, Federal Energy Administration

The Chairman, Council of Economic Advisors

SUBJECT

Questions for Attention in Further Development of NSSM 237



The following is an effort to pose questions which merit attention

in the further development of NSSM/CIEPSM 237. They reflect a con-

sensus derived from the July 14 meeting

2

which you attended under



Frank Zarb’s Chairmanship, and the papers you submitted pursuant to

that discussion. These questions will be considered in light of the analy-

ses, conclusions, and recommendations contained in the NSSM/

CIEPSM at the Undersecretary level meeting to be chaired by Under-

secretary Rogers later this week.

3

1. Assumptions: Are the main assumption of the NSSM study valid;



to wit:

continued significant US, European and Japanese dependence on

OPEC oil through 1985, inextricable linkage of interests between the US

and its major allies and thus an unavoidable necessity to pursue joint

international energy objectives and strategies, significant supply and

price vulnerability of major US allies and thus the necessity for both a

non-confrontational strategy with respect to OPEC and lower oil

1

Source: Ford Library, National Security Council, Institutional Files, Box 41, NSSM



237—U.S. International Energy Policy (1). Secret.

2

No record of the meeting has been found. See Document 99.



3

No record of the meeting has been found. A July 21 memorandum from Joseph A.

Greenwald in the Bureau of Economic and Business Affairs provided Rogers with a gen-

eral framework to address the issues raised in Hormats’s memorandum. (National Ar-

chives, RG 59, S/S Files: Lot 80D212, NSSM 237)


365-608/428-S/80010

October 1975–January 1977 361

prices, and the critical role of Saudi Arabia as a moderator of OPEC

pricing policies and a guarantor of supply.

2. What are US objectives and interests with regard to OPEC pricing?

What level of international oil prices is in the US interest? Are

short-term US price objectives consistent with US long-term interests?

This should be explored in terms of the impact of the international oil

price on U.S. efforts to accelerate energy conservation and develop al-

ternative sources as well as on U.S. global interests. Is the same oil price

which is in the U.S. domestic interest also in the interest of our eco-

nomic partners? Is there a difference? If so, what are the implications

for joint strategies, policies and actions with other industrialized na-

tions? To what extent would a price increase affect U.S. national secu-

rity interests?

3. Contingency Planning: To what extent can policies be developed



during the present non-crisis period in order to strengthen the basis for U.S.

counter-action in the event of various types of crises?

What U.S. counter-

actions would be most appropriate to deal with differing types of po-

tential oil-related crises? What specific forms of economic leverage are

available to the U.S. unilaterally, or with its IEA partners, for counter-

action in the event of unacceptable price increases or supply interrup-

tion? How might such leverage be used as a deterrent? What consid-

erations are likely to increase or decrease U.S. counter-leverage? Do

longer-term supply contracts provide an improved basis for U.S.

counter-action in the event of a disruption; for instance would the abro-

gation of contracts significantly improve the U.S. case domestically or

internationally with respect to forceful U.S. counter-action? Would

such arrangements thereby serve as a deterrent to the interruption of

supplies?

4. How do the non-oil exporting developing countries fit into U.S.

strategy?

Is there any significant linkage between their interests and

moderation by OPEC? What policies or actions should the U.S. under-

take to support the developing countries’ position? What are the risks

associated with attempts to split the LDCs from OPEC? What policies

or responses should the U.S. consider in the event of a change in the de-

veloping countries’ position brought about, for example, by an OPEC

decision to grant them lower oil prices?

5. How might the U.S. better diversify sources of energy supply? Are

there ways of encouraging more production in non-Arab countries?

What might the U.S. do to advance its oil interests in relation to poten-

tially large and more reliable suppliers such as Mexico, the PRC, or

Venezuela? What might such country-specific strategies include?

6. How might the U.S. better address the critical significance of Saudi



Arabia to both U.S. and IEA supply security and price objectives?

What are


prospects for a significant shift in the internal Saudi political situation

365-608/428-S/80010

362 Foreign Relations, 1969–1976, Volume XXXVII

between now and 1980? What are the implications for US policy? What

demands are the Saudis likely to make in order to continue to play a

moderating role; what considerations are involved in their decisions?

What US policies should be considered to support a moderating role

for the Saudis? What policies or actions should the US consider in the

event of a change in the Saudi policy?



102. Memorandum From Robert Hormats of the National Security

Council Staff to the President’s Assistant for National

Security Affairs (Scowcroft)

1

Washington, July 26, 1976.



SUBJECT

NSSM 237 and US Energy Policy

Developing the response to NSSM 237 has been an unsettling proc-

ess,


2

primarily because it reveals the sorry state of US domestic energy

policy and its very dubious foundation in Project Independence. In

short, there appears to be grounds for a complete rethinking of US en-

ergy policy.

The early stages of the NSSM study brought out again what we

have known all along—that while FEA’s ambition to achieve “energy

independence” may be useful as a rhetorical goal, it is neither an attain-

able objective nor a basket in which we should put many of our eggs.

FEA’s import targets are simply unreachable,

at any reasonable cost, even

under FEA’s extremely optimistic assumptions about our ability to

conserve energy and increase production from alternate sources. In the

course of the study, FEA revised its likely import requirement figures

1

Source: Ford Library, National Security Council, Institutional Files, Box 41, NSSM



237—U.S. International Energy Policy (1). Secret; Eyes Only. Sent for information.

2

See Documents 93, 99, and 101. Scowcroft wrote in the margin: “But what do we



do about the study? Use it as a vehicle to surface those questions?” Hormats responded in

an August 9 memorandum to Scowcroft: “The answer is yes. We are now addressing

both the types of changes which might be necessary to strengthen our domestic attempts

to reduce oil imports and the international issues of price and security based on the as-

sumption that we will be more dependent on imports than we had earlier anticipated in

view of the optimistic forecasts of Operation Independence.” He added: “Everyone now

appears satisfied that the new orientations of the study are more consistent with the

policy needs of the USG over the next several years.” (Ford Library, National Security

Council, Institutional Files, Box 41, NSSM 237—U.S. International Energy Policy (1))


365-608/428-S/80010

October 1975–January 1977 363

upward considerably, but they are still 10%–20% lower than those of

most other analysts. When somewhat more realistic import require-

ments are used, it becomes evident that over a 10–15 year period en-

ergy independence has almost no meaning for us in terms of decreas-

ing our vulnerability to supply interruptions; we are going to remain

very vulnerable for the foreseeable future. Perhaps more important in

the short run, we will remain politically vulnerable through the irre-

versible dependence of our industrialized allies no matter how inde-

pendent the United States may become. (On the price side, however, re-

ducing demand does make it more difficult for the OPEC cartel to set

prices, since it increases the excess of supply over demand.)

As meetings have progressed toward the policy level, it has also

become increasingly apparent that there are questions of the most basic sort

about our oil policy for which we do not have adequate answers,

and that as a

result our energy policy is built on what are at best unfounded assump-

tions. The major assumption was that an international energy policy

should be based on the understanding that domestically we would be

making steady progress toward reduced dependence, which in turn

would decrease our vulnerability and indirectly that of our allies, and

exert downward pressure on prices. FEA has now openly admitted that

progress toward independence is a questionable proposition at best

and that they do not know whether it is in our interest to see oil prices

rise or fall. FEA is now telling us that we on the international side should

work through our analysis and tell them how to revise their Project In-

dependence blueprint.

Furthermore, it has become apparent that purely economic analysis is



inadequate to the study.

The NSSM analysis shows that the oil-producing

countries will maintain their ability to set prices, at even higher levels,

as long as the producers with small populations, and therefore limited

capacity to absorb revenues, are willing to provide financial support—

either directly or by restricting production—to those producers which

need or believe they need greater income. Whether they will continue

to do this is a political rather than economic question.

The implications are sweeping. If everything we do economically

is at once uncertain, unlikely to produce any results, and at the margin

of political events, then there are a number of political actions which we

will have to consider more seriously. One key question is how we can

induce moderation in OPEC cartel members and build relationships

which avoid price or supply disruption. We are not now examining this

systematically. (Accepting increased vulnerability may also raise the

cost of holding to our preferred—and frequently negatively per-

ceived—positions in the North-South dialogue, and argue instead for a

more accommodating U.S. position.)



365-608/428-S/80010

364 Foreign Relations, 1969–1976, Volume XXXVII

It would be useful to you to confront Zarb with a number of key

questions so that he can either persuade you that the problems do not

exist or agree that we must trace through their implications. Such ques-

tions would center on the issue of whether we must now adjust our in-

ternational policy to the probability that our dependence in imports

will increase over the next decade or more. Then we must decide

whether the thrust of U.S. policy should shift to a more calculated

policy of encouraging the oil producers to exercise restraint, adopting a

more accommodating view on commodity issues, diversifying our en-

ergy sources on a priority basis, building strategic reserve stocks more

rapidly (which, as you know, I believe to be our best economic means

of coping with, and deferring, an embargo), or more actively seeking

agreements to reduce the possibility of arbitrary supply and price

action.


103. Memorandum From Robert Hormats of the National Security

Council Staff to the President’s Assistant for National

Security Affairs (Scowcroft)

1

Washington, September 15, 1976.



SUBJECT

Your 5:30 Meeting on OPEC Price Increase

Zarb has called this meeting

2

(to include you, Greenspan, Rich-



ardson, and Robinson) to discuss an OPEC price increase.

[less than 1 line not declassified] Saudi Arabia, Iran, and Venezuela

have already agreed to a 10–15% increase, to be formally decided in

Doha, Qatar in December. Arguments supporting the increase include:

greatly increased demand for oil in industrialized countries, increasing

the market strength of OPEC; desire by some OPEC countries to make

up lost purchasing power caused by inflation in industrialized nations;

less fear of harming recovery in the West now that economic activity is

increasing.

1

Source: Ford Library, National Security Adviser, Presidential Subject File, Box 5,



Energy (15). Secret. Sent for action.

2

No record of the meeting has been found. A September 23 memorandum from



Hormats to Scowcroft briefed him for a meeting he would attend later that day on the po-

tential for an OPEC price increase. (Ibid.)



365-608/428-S/80010

October 1975–January 1977 365

Pursuant to your instructions, I asked State last week to work with

CIA and Treasury to prepare an options paper outlining the types of

things which might be done to prevent a price increase.

3

This will be



completed by the end of the week. After having examined a number of

options, the working group concluded that the following steps should

be taken:

—Porter should be instructed to follow-up his recent conversation

with Prince Fahd

4

and indicate US appreciation of his position op-



posing a price increase this year.

—A letter to King Khalid, along with letters applying pressures on

the Shah and Perez of Venezuela, later in the fall.

—US Ambassadors should make de´marches in other OPEC

countries.

—Delegates to CIEC should speak up publicly and in the corridors

against a further price increase.

A number of other “hard-ball” options were considered and re-

jected. These include: more support for Congressional actions on the

boycott; an export surcharge by industrialized countries on sales to

OPEC countries; and threats not to help non-oil LDCs to overcome dif-

ficulties which would be caused by a new oil price increase. In addi-

tion, some incentives to be more responsible—expansion of the activi-

ties of the corps of engineers, indexation of Saudi reserve access in the

US, and facilitation of Saudi investment in American agricultural and

other commodities—were also considered and rejected.

What this all boils down to is:

—It is likely that a decision has already been made to increase the

price of oil from 10% to 15% next year.

—[less than 1 line not declassified] such a decision has not been

reached, our leverage (given the substantial increase in demand for oil

by industrialized countries) is very weak.

—To the extent that the only undecided element in the minds of

the OPEC countries is whether the price should be increased 10% or

15%, we might have some marginal influence.

—The Saudis are keyed to equation, but the key to insuring Saudi

help is pressure on the Iranians and Venezuelans to oppose a price in-

3

The paper, “Strategy Paper for the President on December Oil Price Decision,” un-



dated, is attached to Hormats’s September 23 memorandum.

4

According to telegram 6094 from Jidda, September 8, Porter met with Fahd on



September 7 at the former’s request to discuss a September 2 letter from President Ford to

the Crown Prince on arms sales. (National Archives, RG 59, Central Foreign Policy Files,

D760339–0131) The letter was transmitted in telegram 217223 to Jidda, September 2.

(Ibid., P850071–2596)



365-608/428-S/80010

366 Foreign Relations, 1969–1976, Volume XXXVII

crease (which could, at best, result in their moderating the presently ex-

treme demands for a large price increase).

—In any case, the US must put forward its best case against an in-

crease lest we appear indifferent to an impending development which

will be highly costly to us, to our allies, and to the developing countries.

(We should, however, avoid investing too much prestige if we believe

this to be a losing cause.)

Tactics

—The first step is a letter to Khalid attempting to lock him into

Fahd’s recent statements on his behalf opposing a price increase (Tab

A).


5

If we wish to be tougher, we could send a high-level American offi-

cial to Saudi Arabia to indicate the enormous problems which could re-

sult for American Presidents wishing to support the Saudi dynasty if

the price of oil is increased. The emissary could also point out the still

fragile condition of a number of developed country economies.

—Strong letters to the Iranians and Venezuelans arguing against a

price increase on grounds that it would be politically disruptive and

economically unjustifiable.

—De´marches in other OPEC capitals.

—Gentle reminders in key non-oil LDCs as to the likely impact of a

price increase on their economies and on the will and ability of other

developed countries to assist them.

6

5



Not attached and not found.

6

President Ford met with Prince Saud on September 17 and told him that “any in-



crease this December or for ’77 would be extremely damaging, not only for the United

States, but even more so for our industrial colleagues who are in a much more fragile situ-

ation.” Ford added: “We plan to discus this not just with you but also with Iran and Vene-

zuela. It would be disastrous to push the world economy back to the recession of last

year. So we hope His Majesty’s views will prevail.” Saud replied: “His Majesty is just as

determined as last summer not to have an increase. But it will be difficult, and it will de-

pend heavily on what you can do with Iran and Venezuela. His Majesty has said at least

he will refuse more than a modest increase, and will categorically refuse anything be-

yond 5 percent.” (Ford Library, National Security Adviser, Memoranda of Conversa-

tions, Box 21)



365-608/428-S/80010

October 1975–January 1977 367



Download 8.4 Mb.

Do'stlaringiz bilan baham:
1   ...   33   34   35   36   37   38   39   40   ...   95




Ma'lumotlar bazasi mualliflik huquqi bilan himoyalangan ©fayllar.org 2020
ma'muriyatiga murojaat qiling